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Edmund Husserl: Philosopher of Infinite Tasks (Northwestern University studies in phenomenology & existential philosophy) Hardcover – December 1, 1973


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Product Details

  • Series: Northwestern University studies in phenomenology & existential philosophy
  • Hardcover: 227 pages
  • Publisher: Northwestern University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810104253
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810104259
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,820,026 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Winner of the National Book Award
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Maurice Alexander Natanson (1924–1996) was an American philosopher "who helped introduce the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Edmund Husserl in the United States" He was a student of Alfred Schutz at the New School for Social Research and helped popularize Schutz' work from the 1960s onward. During his career he taught at the University of Houston, the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research, the University of North Carolina, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and Yale University. He was a visiting professor at the Pennsylvania State University and University of California, Berkeley.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By mwalton@mail.slc.edu on December 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
Natanson's book is amazingly well-written. Husserl's often difficult and wordy ideas of phenomenology are covered clearly enough for the beginner, and in-depth enough for the student of Husserl. Natanson offers not just a review of phenomenology, but covers all from attitudes to methods, existence to the application of phenomenology. This is the first book I recommend to anyone studying Husserl.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Patrick Killough on January 23, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What do phenomenologists do?

Nowadays they do what the father of modern phenomenology, Austrian-born Professor Edmund Husserl (1859 - 1938) , taught his students and readers to do. They philosophize in a distinctly new way. They ask

(1) What things in the common-sense, space-time continuum real world can we know beyond doubt or error?

and

(2) What makes such knowledge possible?

Before he was a philosopher, Edmund Husserl was a mathematician and a natural scientist. He began philosophizing as a Cartesian. He agreed with Rene Descartes that "cogito ergo sum" (I think, therefore I am) is true beyond doubt. Descartes pushed his insights up to the door leading into phenomenological analysis but did not go through that door.

Husserl made cogito ergo sum more explicit: ego cogito cogitatum. I think something thought. Early on, Husserl focused on the cogitatum, the object thought about. The ego/mind passively receives impressions of extra-mental objects presented by the senses.

Most of his earliest students, including Adolph Reinach and (future canonized saint) Edith Stein began with Husserl at this first stage in his evolution. In those days Husserl was focusing on the known world as real, extra-mental world. He was busy, everyone thought, re-establishing the ancient Aristotelian and Scholastic philosophia perennis of knowable, necessary, pure essences.

Then in 1913 Husserl published IDEAS. In that book he fell back, ostensibly, into an earlier German philosophical passion for idealism associated with Hegel. Husserl moved, it seemed, away from the thing thought and its objective reality. He now focused on the act of knowing (cogitatio) and the knowing ego (cogitans).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By reading in CT on March 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a book group selection was challenging, I had to use my dictionary app many times. Phenomenology is an essential philosophy.
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