What Does It Mean to Be Well Educated? and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $3.59 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 15 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good Condition. Some wear and tear plus marks in by previous reader. You won't be dissapointed. Item is Fulfilled by AMAZON - Eligible for FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping. Amazon Customer Service with Delivery Tracking. Receive your item in 3-5 Days!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

What Does it Mean to Be Well Educated? And Other Essays on Standards, Grading, and Other Follies Paperback – May 15, 2004

ISBN-13: 004-6442032674 ISBN-10: 0807032670

Buy New
Price: $12.41
48 New from $8.38 55 Used from $1.80 1 Collectible from $9.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.41
$8.38 $1.80
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

What Does it Mean to Be Well Educated? And Other Essays on Standards, Grading, and Other Follies + Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 30th Anniversary Edition
Price for both: $32.47

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (May 15, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807032670
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807032671
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #402,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If general readers recognize Kohn's name, it's thanks to his campaign against standardized testing (The Case Against Standardized Testing). Educational professionals will recall Kohn's insights into classroom management (Punished by Rewards) and school reform (The Schools Our Children Deserve). This collection of essays, written from 1999 to 2003, proves the author is one of America's most astute critics of current educational policies. Kohn revisits the standards and testing mania, but also takes on other controversial issues: grade inflation, school violence and how educators can deal with the aftermath of 9/11. "Turning Learning into a Business" is an informative and incisive critique of the many ways in which Kohn sees the corporate world exploiting kids and profiting from schools through the marketing of tests, advertising in schools and textbooks, and turning schools into for-profit businesses. Kohn carefully links these issues to larger social concerns: "one of the most crucial tasks in a democratic society" is "the act of limiting the power that corporations have in determining what happens in, and to, our schools." Kohn is unapologetic and articulate about the advantages of a progressive approach to education that values students' interests, focuses on understanding (rather than the acquisition of isolated facts) and assesses student work authentically (rather than by single, standardized measures). True to his educational philosophy, he asks readers to consider big questions, such as: What's important to know? What are the qualities of a good school? And perhaps most vital, Who gets to decide and who benefits?
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

The most energetic and charismatic figure standing in the way of a major federal effort to make standardized curriculums and tests a fact of life in every U.S. school. --Washington Post

"Of the dozens of 'experts' on what's wrong (and right) in U.S. schools, only a handful are truly worth reading; Kohn has long been one of the soundest. His willingness not simply to challenge conventional answers but also examine whether we're asking the right questions gives his work a genuinely eye-opening quality." --Booklist

"Kohn cuts against the grain and takes on adversaries without fear, and yet with a mature and rational sophistication. He draws upon a rich tradition, citing the work of Dewey, Bruner, Piaget, and Holt, among others, but he now takes his proper place within their ranks." --Jonathan Kozol

More About the Author

Alfie Kohn writes and speaks widely on human behavior, education, and parenting. He is the author of twelve books and hundreds of articles. Kohn has been described by Time Magazine as "perhaps the country's most outspoken critic of education's fixation on grades and test scores." He has appeared twice on "Oprah," as well as on "The Today Show," NPR's "Talk of the Nation," and on many other TV and radio programs. He spends much of his time speaking at education conferences, as well as to parent groups, school faculties, and researchers. Kohn lives (actually) in the Boston area - and (virtually) at www.alfiekohn.org.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Abby on June 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
It is quite unusual to find a book that is a collection of articles and essays as pageturning as What Does It Mean To Be Well Educated? by Alphie Kohn. As I was reading, I found myself becomming excited by Kohn's ideas, even at times verbalizing agreement with him and nodding my head as if he and I were talking.
When Alphie Kohn has an idea he takes it, runs with it, and never looks back. His book is thoroughly researched, but what I really enjoyed about this book is that there is no other author (or very few, rather) who has expressed such a defiance to the public school system as it currently is. Kohn has qualitative and quantitative research backing him up left and right, as well as plenty of moving testimonials, as to why the public school system is in desperate need of reform.
To most critics, reform means "higher standards", "raising the bar", more testing and less recess. Not to Kohn. He delves into the true meaning (or lack there of) of those now cliché terms politicians have created (politicians mind you, not educators) to drum up support for the regression of our country's educationals system. Kohn takes the next step and frankly explains why they are wrong and what we can do to fix a broken system.
Quite the revolutionary, Kohn boldly suggests ridding the public school system not only of annual standardized tests and college enterance tests (i.e. ACT, SAT), but of grades as well. Sound intriguing? It is. And Kohn does a spectacular job of presenting his arguments with ample reasoning and research as well as what he believes the alternatives should be, and does it all in an easily readable manner without being pretentious.
I did feel like at times, however, that Kohn may have gone a bit too extreme even for me.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By SHISHIR on October 22, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an insightful book outlining some of the things that do and do not work in education and what could be done to improve those.

For example, emphasis on passing standardized test does not necessarily improve learning and knowledge but only helps students become good at cracking a specific type of test. Learning often takes back seat compared to learning tricks to crack the test. It may even become a measure of resources to join courses to help crack such tests, which does not necessarily measure knowledge or intelligence.

There are sugestions like making work at schools more project, problem solving and discovery oriented, where students have to cooperate, show initiative and think logically to solve problems rather than simply learning tricks to solve certain type of questions.

I only found the section on capitalistic conspiracy theory a bit distractive from main idea. However, I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in education.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 28 people found the following review helpful By K. Duff on October 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you are truly interested in what can be done to improve our schools, and tired of the rhetoric fed to you by politicians and the media, this book will definitely give you some meat to chew on and think about. I recommend it for all who believe in the value of education.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 15, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Alfie Kohn always does a good job of bringing a lot of enthusiasm and emotion to books like this. He definitely has a lot of good points, and at least attempts to make reference to studies. You will find yourself agreeing with a lot of the little observations he makes and many of his big ideas. However, as many have pointed out, a book like this tends to end up sounding like a collection of complaints more than a systematic discussion of what it actually means to be well-educated. I have implemented a number of his ideas in my own classroom with good success. The problem is that while he is clear about what shouldn't happen in a classroom, his discussion of what should happen always tends to be a little more open-ended and general. For example, he claims that students don't need to pack their heads with facts for a successful career, but rather need to be enthusiastic problem solvers and thinkers. So he suggests teachers shouldn't focus as much on rote memorization and factual knowledge. What is lacking is an in-depth discussion of how to foster thinking skills and problem solving in a classroom and maintain some sort of expectations of what kids should and will know or be able to do. This is the kind of book that makes for good, light reading about education and that can get you thinking. It is not the kind of book that should be widely quoted in serious research papers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Deniseya Hall on August 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
Delivered way before estimated delivery date , and the book is in fantastic condition. Feels as if it is absolutely new ... it just might be! Also really afforable! Very pleased with purchase! :)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search