Trade in your item
Get up to a $1.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Edward II
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Edward II


Available from these sellers.
4 new from $67.42 17 used from $5.00
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD 1-Disc Version
$67.42 $5.00

Deal of the Week: 68% Off Wonder Woman: The Complete Collection
This week only, save up to 68% on the "Wonder Woman: The Complete Collection." Relive the original episodes from the classic series that aired from 1976-79 starring Lynda Carter, celebrating one of the first DC Comics superheroines to star on television. The offer to own this series ends July 26, 2014, 11:59 pm PST. Shop now

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Steven Waddington, Andrew Tieman, John Lynch, Tilda Swinton, Annie Lennox
  • Directors: Derek Jarman
  • Format: Color, NTSC, Special Edition, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Image Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: June 14, 2005
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000929ARI
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #140,571 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Edward II" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The King of England finds his throne in peril when he brings his lover, Gaveston, enraging the current queen who goes on a rampage of vengeance.

Customer Reviews

As a movie I might pay money to see, not so much.
wiredweird
This film presents a Jacobean style rendering of this play with very modern sets and costumes and truly a hightened gay sensibility.
P. Clegg
Edward neglects all his princely duties of governing England so he can hang out with Gaveston and party.
Q

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Q on September 18, 2005
Format: DVD
Wow!, this is an amazing viewing experience, and definitely the best Derek Jarman film that I've seen. The script is based on Christopher Marlowe's equally bizarre 16th century playscript, the story of King Edward II and his love for his favorite Gaveston. Edward neglects all his princely duties of governing England so he can hang out with Gaveston and party. He also rejects the love of his wife, Queen Isabella from France. The leading nobles then conspire with Isabella to get rid of Gaveston, and eventually to depose Edward and murder him in a particularly gruesome manner.

Jarman retains the original Elizabethan language (don't worry, it's very accessible) but modernizes the setting to some extent, keeping the medieval castle, but updating the costumes and some props. Medieval and modern elements are mixed together in post-modern fashion. This is a very stylized and even symbolic production, although the story is more or less dramatically realistic. The original dialogue has been edited and shortened, in order to highlight the settings and gestures. The play is a visual and musical feast for the senses. Jarman's treatment of the play reminds me of Julie Taymor's TITUS (based on Shakespeare's Titus Andonicus) starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange.

But be forewarned, this is not for the squeamish; there is lots of male nudity and even homosexual love making, although enough is hidden to keep the "R" rating. There is also a fair amount of violence.

The play's treatment of homosexuality is very interesting and complex.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 5, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Derek Jarman seems to have come within reach of mere human understanding. This film actually has a narrative, which is unusual for Jarman and satisfying for us regular folk. Edward II is based on a play by Christopher Marlowe, a playwright who,like the subject of this film, was persecuted for his homosexuality in his own time.
Steven Waddington lustily portrays the doomed king. Jarman places the sexuality square in the audience's face with enough edge to make it interesting, yet avoids gratuitous tastelessness and boredom.
One especially memorable Jarmanesque event is the surprise appearance of Annie Lennox singing the haunting "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye" by Cole Porter. Ms. Lennox is quite simply, Ms. Lennox. Other striking touches are the contemporary clothing on some of the characters and the appealingly moody sets.
As for historical reality,I suggest you consult your English history books for the grim facts of this king's life and death. Matthew Shepard's death reminds us that animal brutality is alive and well in our own time. The film does make obvious reference to the modern day persecution of gays and lesbians, and perhaps this is at least part of Jarman's reason for filming this story.
I can't say enough about this film. When my local video store was about to liquidate its supply of seldom rented video, I bought the only copy. It saddened me to see that little piece of art taken out to make room for the everyday and the mundane.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Kat on September 25, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
First off, I have to say that this movie should not be viewed as a rendition of the Marlowe play, but as its own creation. If you are expecting a faithful adaptation, you will be disappointed. However, if you come to it without prejudice, it is an impressive cinematic work of scope and vision.
Jarman's directing style is not for everyone--plot continuity or story structure is not very important to him--but he crafts each scene of the film with such care and skill that the sensuousnes of the cinematography becomes the central point. The film is presented as a gallery of images: every shot is a painting. Everything is subordinated for the effect of these images: the narrative is presented in a series of symbols and allegories, switching between times, places, reality and fantasy, until it all blends together in a wonderful cascade of pure visual exhiliration. This movie is first and foremost an aesthetic experience: watch it for the sake of watching it, enjoy first and alalyze later.
Should you wish to analyze it after all, you will find that the seemingly aimless or irrelevant images are actually an integral part of the story, carefully distributed throughout. There is meaning in everything that is presented in the film, from the extraneous vision of an Apollo with a golden snake, to the huddle of Rugby players Edward's son stumbles upon during his midnight forays. It is telling that the final scene has the Queen and Mortimer sitting inside a cage, caked in flour, while the son (wearing a suit and his mother's earrings and listening to a walkman) dances on top. Jarman goes with the maxim "a picture is worth a thousand words," and prefers to tell his story through abstract yet meaning-laden images.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Grigory's Girl on July 13, 2006
Format: DVD
This is a very well made, interesting, and unique interpretation of Christopher Marlowe's Edward II. It is by Derek Jarman, one of the most neglected British filmmakers in history. This is best known film in the US, and while he's made better films, this one is still excellent. The first time you see the film it can be rather off putting. First of all, the characters wear contemporary clothes (even though it took place in the 14th century), and they smoke cigarettes. The film is very stylized, there are some rather heavygoing sex scenes at the beginning of the film, and there are appearances by OutRage, a British gay rights group that Jarman was a member of. Aside from the anarchorisms and the sex, it still feels like a Shakespeare play in many ways. It is interesting to note that in Mel Gibson's film Braveheart, the son of Edward Longshanks was, in fact, Edward II. In Mel's film, he was portrayed in a stereotypical, effeminate way. In Jarman's film, Edward is much more dynamic and intelligent. Jarman's portrayal, while a little idealised, is still more realistic than Gibson's film. Granted, Gibson wasn't making a film about Edward II, but it still would have been good of him to get the portrayal right. The other performances are top notch (especially Tilda Swinton as the jilted queen, and Nigel Terry as Mortimer). Annie Lennox singing "Every Time We Say Goodbye" is reminiscent of Jarman's film of The Tempest, when Elisabeth Welch sings Stormy Weather at the end. Everything in this film works. It sounds like it could go out of control and turn into a camp fest, but it never does. Well worth seeing...
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category