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It's Me, Edward Wayne Edwards, the Serial Killer You Never Heard Of Hardcover – January 15, 2014

3.9 out of 5 stars 89 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Former police sergeant and cold-case expert John Cameron believes he knows who killed Teresa Halbach and it isn't Making a Murderer subject Steven Avery. Cameron has a theory...that an infamous serial killer named Edward Wayne Edwards, who's known to frame others for his murders, is behind the killing that's at the center of the Netflix docuseries...And there are certainly some interesting connections. --Business Insider, January 2016

...the further you go down the rabbit hole, the harder it gets to ignore certain evidence unearthed by Cameron. --Ryan Harkess, Uproxx

About the Author

John A. Cameron is a retired police detective from Great Falls, Montana. His career in law enforcement began in 1979. He retired in 2005 as a sergeant of detectives, working cold cases. He has worked on FBI serial killer task forces, catching ritualistic child cannibal killer, Nathan Bar-Jonah. His cases have been featured on America's Most Wanted, Dateline NBC, and he co-produced the Most Evil-True TV series.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Golden Door Press; First Edition edition (January 15, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885793030
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885793034
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (89 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #178,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really go back and forth on this book a lot. On one hand, it is not very well written at all (Cameron isn't really a writer, so he should probably be forgiven for that). On the other hand, I found it intensely interesting and couldn't really put it down. Some of the primary materials, including letters written by Edwards, are curiously odd and sometimes terrifying. There is a lot in this book that seems impossible to believe (such as the Ramsey and Hoffa claims), but there are also connections that you can't really deny (such as the fact that Edwards actually did know Jimmy Hoffa quite well).

Most people who will read this book will be those curious about the case that Edwards was the Zodiac. I don't know if he was or not, but Cameron shows several similarities Edward E shares with Zodiac that none of the other "suspects" do: 1) We know Edwards was a serial killer who often targeted couples, 2) We know that Edwards liked to write letters to newspapers and the police and that he bragged about his crimes through media outlets, and 3) We have documentation of Edwards claiming to know the identity of Zodiac.

Other stuff seems more dubious. It's hard to say for sure that Edwards was even in California at the time when Zodiac was active. Aside from that, Cameron connects him to *so many* high profile cases that you can get the sneaking suspicion that it's over sensationalized to hype the book. I don't really know what I think, but it's worth a read, in any case.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
January 1956 the police found the body of a missing girl on my dad's land but they never found the killer. If they had maybe the families of the victims of the Zodiac killer, Jon Benet's family, and many others would not be experiencing the never-ending pain the Kalitske and Bogle families have suffered. Had members of law enforcement looked right under their noses...but how many times did Edward Wayne Edwards escape detection? According to John A. Cameron, cold case detective and author, too many. In true crime fashion, It's Me attempts to decipher the convoluted path Edward Wayne Edward's life took. Could it be true that one man is responsible for so many untimely deaths including the Atlanta child murders in the 1980s? Though disputed by some, law enforcement hasn't solved these crimes. I couldn't put the book down until I finished reading 400 pages complete with newspaper articles, letters, and other documents that seem to substantiate John A. Cameron's claims. Will Edward Wayne Edwards be tried for these crimes? Unfortunately, not; he died of natural causes at age 77 in 2011.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I grew up in Great Falls so when I heard about this book I had to buy it. Setting aside that this is a poorly written (who writes and talks about themselves in the 3rd person?) and edited book that reads like “See Jane Run!” I gave it a try. I was only a few months old when Kalitzke and Bogle were murdered, but like everyone in GF I knew about them. Cameron outlined very convincingly that there is a strong case that Edwards likely murdered this young couple. He’s probably good for the three Oregon murders as well. His case for Edwards being the Zodiac Killer is compelling, though I’m not really sold yet. That said, when Cameron goes off on the tangent blaming Edwards for every sensational murder that happened in the 1940s and 1950s, well his credibility is totally gone. I cannot even begin to believe that a 13-14 year old boy dissected the Black Dahlia with such surgical precision that there were no scapel nicks on her bones and then drained her of blood. And the way he has him driving here and there committing one heinous murder after another but making it back to point A in no time at all. These murders took place before the interstate highway system people! And finally, JonBenet Ramsey - Puhleeze!! I’m surprised he didn’t blame him for the Lizzie Borden murders. Unless you like to read fantasy then skip this book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Started off good connecting Zodiac killings and a few others to this guy. No doubt, Ed Edwards was an evil man, confessing to 5 murders, so I'm sure there were others that we will never know about. It's the 20% rule, usually only about 20% of a criminals crimes are known/convicted. Which brings me to another point. If he was so intelligent as the author claims, why did he get caught and sent to prison so many times throughout his life for "lesser than murder" crimes?
About half way through the book I knew the fix was in. The author basically attributes the most well known murders/cold cases from the past 50+ years to Ed Edwards. This is practically impossible. Edwards would have been 13 at the time of Elizabeth Short murder. The book also suggests that Edwards may have been responsible for the shooting of his own mother(because she had him out of wedlock):)Wait- he was 5 years old when his mother committed suicide, laughable!
At the end of the book there is an appendix of known murders credited to Edwards, it's in the hundreds, all over the US. While it is clear Edwards was a well traveled man, this would have made him the busiest multitasking person ever to live. He even adds in this section that Scott Peterson is a falsely imprisoned innocent man! This and other accusations by the author are irresponsible and could be damaging to the victims families. You just don't throw claims this flagrant around and get away with it.
In the end it turns into linking murders by "special dates", name tie ins, and complete coincidence that the author shoots himself in the foot with. By the completely unbelievable claims made in this book.
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