Trade in your item
Get a $18.77
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Edward Weston: Forms of Passion Hardcover – October 30, 1995


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$138.98 $35.90

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 367 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams; 1st edition (October 30, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810939797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810939790
  • Product Dimensions: 12.3 x 9.9 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #806,845 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This lavish text-and-picture reconstruction of early-20th-century art photography icon Edward Weston and his work aligns him within the defining cultural dimension of the 1990s: human sensuality. "Weston's forms are nothing if not sensually motivated," writes Mora (Walker Evans: The Hungry Eye), the book's editor and one of five photography historians who here analyze unfolding phases of his artistic development. We are shown his commercial portraiture and pictorialism and the Stieglitz Photo-Secession, Group f.64's unmanipulated style, his "coherent whole" discovery in Mexico, an exploration and artistic transformation anew on Guggenheim grants and the pure-photography "eternalizing" and "objectification" of a universal subject, whether a seashell, a bell pepper ("reeks with sexuality") or the female form in seemingly limitless sensual variety. More than 50 nude studies are included.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Aperture. 1995. 96p. photogs. ISBN 0-89381-605-1. $40. PHOTOG Weston's (1886-1958) photographic career began in 1911 and ended in 1948, with the onset of Parkinson's disease. Beaumont Newhall called Weston the founding father of American photography; certainly his straightforward, modernist approach dominated American photography until well after his death. Of these two new books, editor Mora's is the more valuable for history of photography and fine arts collections. His survey presents Weston's life comprehensively and exhaustively than has been attempted in any of the numerous Weston monographs before. The essays offer biographical information and analyze the photographs in the context of what Weston was doing and thinking at the time. Mora (former editor of Les Cahiers de la Photographie) provides an introduction and discusses Weston's work in Mexico; other writers, all well-qualified curators and academics, discuss such topics as Weston's earliest work; his experimental work with nudes and natural forms; and the work Weston did under his two Guggenheim fellowships from 1937 to 1939 (the first ever awarded for photography). The book draws on two major collections: those at the Center for Creative Photography, which has the Weston Archives, and the Lane Collection at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. From about 10,000 images, the book shows 130, 25 percent of which have never before been reproduced. The photographs are arranged chronologically and are grouped to accompany the five essays. The illustrations are fine though not as rich as those in Aperture's Portraits. This serious, scholarly book, with well-written, engaging essays is appropriate for research collections and lay readers alike. Aperture's Edward Weston: Portraits is a less ambitious and more casual presentation of one part of Weston's portfolio, the portraits that earned his keep and comprise 70 percent of his work, according to the book jacket. In the finest reproduction quality, the most familiar portraits of famous artists, writers, and others who featured in Weston's life and work are presented in roughly chronological order. Cole Weston's one-page recollection of his father is warm and anecdotal. Morgan (contributing writer at Elle and Mirabella and author of Martin Munkasci, Aperture, 1992) contributed an essay that will appeal to the informed lay reader rather than to specialists in photography. Weston's life is sketched out, and Morgan tells us about the people who were Weston's portrait subjects and models. However, in contrast to Edward Weston: Forms of Passion, there is little analysis of Weston's developing aesthetic except those thoughts of Weston himself from his Daybooks, quotes from which accompany some of the photographs.?Kathleen Collins, New York Transit Museum Archives, Brooklyn
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 30, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Review Summary: Edward Weston was trained as a portrait photographer and expanded his vision to include many natural shapes, including seashells, nudes, vegetables, trees, landscapes, and eroded rocks. He also did a little industrial photography, where the forms he saw also revealed pure shapes of interest to him. These shapes usually had a modernist feel to them that brings to mind Plato's theory of forms, pure ideas behind what we see every day. This book is fine overview of all phases of Mr. Weston's career, and contains many interesting and valuable essays about his career. The book is improved by having over 80 images that had not been published before this volume. The 320 duotone images are on very fine paper and are extremely well reproduced. Many would have benefited from being printed in larger sizes. If you decide to own only one book of Edward Weston's work, I suggest you choose this one.
Viewer Caution: This book contains many nude images of women, men and children that would surpass what would allow the material to obtain an R rating as a motion picture.
Review: Edward Weston's photography reveals a personal fascination with form, shape and shadow that provide a unique vision into the natural world. He was especially intrigued to see how the shapes of one object or subject could complement another. For example, his female nudes are often posed outdoors in sand dunes or beach settings where the gentle curves play off of one another. Where he focuses on eroded rocks, each one combines with another to express the equivalent of an abstract sculpture, standing out exposed by the erosion around the harder rock that forms the image.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Peter Hoyles on October 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone curious about Weston or wanting to own a representative selection of his work should buy this book. This IS Weston. This is not a few selected prints of his on a single theme, this is a wide representation of the best of Weston's work. One will find for oneself that ALL of Weston's pictures are about passion, that's what makes a picture a Weston. Here in this book are beautifully reproduced plates of his finest images, every one exuding shape and energy, and exquisite composition, none just ordinary. There are images of factories, fields, sand, wood and also the human body, all of which have been captured in all its glory by Weston. He teaches us that there is energy, art and passion in an amazing number of ways. Don't miss this fine book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 30, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Review Summary: Edward Weston was trained as a portrait photographer and expanded his vision to include many natural shapes, including seashells, nudes, vegetables, trees, landscapes, and eroded rocks. He also did a little industrial photography, where the forms he saw also revealed pure shapes of interest to him. These shapes usually had a modernist feel to them that brings to mind Plato's theory of forms, pure ideas behind what we see every day. This book is fine overview of all phases of Mr. Weston's career, and contains many interesting and valuable essays about his career. The book is improved by having over 80 images that had not been published before this volume. The 320 duotone images are on very fine paper and are extremely well reproduced. Many would have benefited from being printed in larger sizes. If you decide to own only one book of Edward Weston's work, I suggest you choose this one.
Viewer Caution: This book contains many nude images of women, men and children that would surpass what would allow the material to obtain an R rating as a motion picture.
Review: Edward Weston's photography reveals a personal fascination with form, shape and shadow that provide a unique vision into the natural world. He was especially intrigued to see how the shapes of one object or subject could complement another. For example, his female nudes are often posed outdoors in sand dunes or beach settings where the gentle curves play off of one another. Where he focuses on eroded rocks, each one combines with another to express the equivalent of an abstract sculpture, standing out exposed by the erosion around the harder rock that forms the image.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?