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Comment: TITLE: EERDMANS COMMENTARY ON THE BIBLEAUTHOR: DUNN, J edISBN 10: 0802837115ISBN 13: 9780802837110BINDING: Hardback without Dust JacketPUBLICATION DATE: 2003PAGES: 1629DESCRIPTION: This volume will have extensive marking/highlighting and-or bent pages and-or dinged pages/corners and-or weak/broken hinges and-or library stickers, stamps, or pouches and-or mildew and-or water damage. This volume will be usable but won't be pretty. Transit time: 5-24 Days.
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Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible Hardcover – November 19, 2003


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

An international team of 63 biblical scholars offers this judicious and solid introduction to the varieties of biblical literature. Like similar one-volume commentaries from Oxford and HarperCollins, this one covers the Apocrypha, though the Eerdmans commentary is more comprehensive, adding an expansive chapter on the oft-overlooked pseudo-epigraphical book of 1 Enoch. Each entry begins with some kind of overview of the biblical or apocryphal book in question, then proceeds to analyze the book section by section rather than verse by verse (a real boon for nonspecialists who often get lost in abstruse, highly technical discussions). The commentary uses the New Revised Standard Version, though some contributors add their own insights about the meanings of contested Hebrew or Greek terms. The essayists draw upon and summarize previous biblical scholarship and sometimes offer revisionist explanations (as with Morna Hooker's passionate and well-argued reinterpretation of Philemon).
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"The Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible contains scholarship that is both international and ecumenical, including contributions from Catholics as well as Protestants. Most of the contributors have well-established international reputations, and several are at the top of their field. Especially welcome is the inclusion of the Apocrypha, two essays on the Dead Sea Scrolls, an introduction to the Pseudepigrapha, and even a commentary on 1 Enoch, which may be unique to a Bible commentary of this kind. The Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible is a very useful resource for college and seminary students and those who teach them." John J Collins
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1649 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (November 19, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802837115
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802837110
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 7.5 x 2.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,665 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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This text will be useful to students, pastors, scholars and interested laypersons.
FrKurt Messick
I would recommend this commentary to any of my fellow Catholics as a useful addition to their research libraries.
T. Franz
Having read, used, and owned many one-volume commentaries, I find this is more thorough and balanced than most.
Pastor Scott

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 69 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on January 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible, edited by James D.G. Dunn (University of Durham) and John W. Rogerson (University of Sheffield), is a monumental work, the latest in one-volume commentaries on the Bible. This is a huge book, over 1600 pages (any larger and it would have had to have been split, making it no longer a one-volume commentary).
My general practice is to disapprove of reliance on one commentary only. For depth and breadth of interpretation, one really needs to consult many different treatments of texts. However, for many, the limitations of time and finances prevent having a number of separate commentaries on individual biblical books, much less a range of commentaries on each one. I think that the Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible will be a good investment for those looking for insight and interpretation but who do not have the cause to invest in individual commentaries on each book of the Bible. It is best coupled with a Bible dictionary; fortunately, Eerdmans produced just a few years prior to this commentary a high-quality Bible dictionary, also, which would be a good companion.
The Eerdmans Commentary on the Bible claims to be the most complete one-volume commentary - actually, it claims to be the only one-volume commentary to include all canonical texts (which is a claim that depends upon your definition of canonical). It includes all 66 of the traditional Protestant Bible arranged in typical Christian order, with the books of the Old Testament Apocrypha, and the Pseudepigraphic text of I Enoch.
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75 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Joe DiAlcamo on June 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This commentary is difficult to describe. Overall it's one of the best I've read (and I've read my fair share), but at the same time it's not for the undiscerning reader. One must be studied enough to `separate the wheat from the chaff'. The editors make no apology for including contributors from "a wide variety of backgrounds and faith traditions." (Preface), some of them quite liberal in their view of Scripture.

For example, in the introductory article to the Pentateuch, David Noel Freedman explicitly rejects Mosaic authorship ("...a Mosaic date for the composition of the Pentateuch [is] untenable." p. 26) and instead embraces the Documentary Hypothesis, which he proceeds to cover at length.

Likewise, in the introduction to Isaiah, Margaret Barker discusses how "modern scholarship" (a favorite phrase of many contributors) has revealed what we know as the book of Isaiah to be the work of three separate authors (of whom Isaiah is one and the other two are unknown) at three separate periods of history.

I've found these kinds of theories to be based on dubious grounds when closely scrutinized, but that's another discussion.

Likewise, miracles are sometimes called into serious question. Consider David Tomes' commentary regarding Elijah on Mt. Carmel:
"Did such a decisive confrontation really take place? The major difficulty lies in believing that a miracle of this kind could have occurred. But there is also the problem that a generation later Baal worship had to be eradicated from Israel all over again, in a much more down-to-earth way (2 Kgs 10:15-27). Perhaps we should regard the story as a dramatization of beliefs and hopes about the relationship between Yahweh and other gods rather than as verifiable history." P.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By T. Franz on October 27, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a beginner in bible study, although I have been reading and praying Scripture for several years. The Eerdman's Commentary has clear articles, well written and yet not too lofty, so that a person with my scholastic background can reap much fruit. As I am Catholic, the articles on the Deuterocanonical books--the Apocryphal Books to non-Catholic or non-Orthodox Christians--are most appreciated. I would recommend this commentary to any of my fellow Catholics as a useful addition to their research libraries.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian Gueringer on June 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you are looking to get back to the basic beliefs of the bible and get away from all of the "Doctrine" of the bible, this is a good place to start. I must tell you I am a biblical monotheist. So I believe that Christ was human and not God. So I may read it looking for different information than a trinitarian would. However I feel that no matter your belief it will help you advance your understanding into the earlier systems that were used. There are parts that show the trinity in the bible which I would not agree with. However the biggest jem I have found in it is the breakdown of John 1:1. It brings the wisdom theology of John to the fore front and shows what the word really is. James Dunn was involved in this work and has written some great books himself about Jesus and the beliefs of those who followed him. Did the early Christians believe jesus was God and the theology of paul. I have them both and have not finished reading the theology of Paul but did enjoy the Jesus book and am enjoying the Paul book.
So if you are looking to add to your knowledge and maybe have your beliefs challenged in some ways pick it up. It is very affordable and a great addition to any library of those who love learning!!
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