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Effective Enterprise Java [Paperback]

Ted Neward
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)

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Book Description

September 5, 2004 0321130006 978-0321130006 1

"With this book, Ted Neward helps you make the leap from being a good Java enterprise developer to a great developer!"
—John Crupi, Sun Distinguished Engineer coauthor, Core J2EE Patterns

If you want to build better Java enterprise applications and work more efficiently, look no further. Inside, you will find an accessible guide to the nuances of Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) development. Learn how to:

  • Use in-process or local storage to avoid the network, see item 44
  • Set lower isolation levels for better transactional throughput, see item 35
  • Use Web services for open integration, see item 22
  • Consider your lookup carefully, see item 16
  • Pre-generate content to minimize processing, see item 55
  • Utilize role-based authorization, see item 63
  • Be robust in the face of failure, see item 7
  • Employ independent JREs for side-by-side versioning, see item 69

Ted Neward provides you with 75 easily digestible tips that will help you master J2EE development on a systemic and architectural level. His panoramic look at the good, the bad, and the ugly aspects of J2EE development will address your most pressing concerns. Learn how to design your enterprise systems so they adapt to future demands. Improve the efficiency of your code without compromising its correctness. Discover how to implement sophisticated functionality that is not directly supported by the language or platform. After reading Effective Enterprise Java , you will know how to design and implement better, more scalable enterprise-scope Java software systems.


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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

"With this book, Ted Neward helps you make the leap from being a good Java enterprise developer to a great developer!"
—John Crupi, Sun Distinguished Engineer coauthor, Core J2EE Patterns

If you want to build better Java enterprise applications and work more efficiently, look no further. Inside, you will find an accessible guide to the nuances of Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) development. Learn how to:

  • Use in-process or local storage to avoid the network, see item 44
  • Set lower isolation levels for better transactional throughput, see item 35
  • Use Web services for open integration, see item 22
  • Consider your lookup carefully, see item 16
  • Pre-generate content to minimize processing, see item 55
  • Utilize role-based authorization, see item 63
  • Be robust in the face of failure, see item 7
  • Employ independent JREs for side-by-side versioning, see item 69

Ted Neward provides you with 75 easily digestible tips that will help you master J2EE development on a systemic and architectural level. His panoramic look at the good, the bad, and the ugly aspects of J2EE development will address your most pressing concerns. Learn how to design your enterprise systems so they adapt to future demands. Improve the efficiency of your code without compromising its correctness. Discover how to implement sophisticated functionality that is not directly supported by the language or platform. After reading Effective Enterprise Java , you will know how to design and implement better, more scalable enterprise-scope Java software systems.



About the Author

Ted Neward is a software architect, consultant, author, and presenter who has consulted for such companies as Intuit and Pacific Bell, and UC Davis. He is the author of Server-Based Java Programming (Manning, 2000), and coauthor of C# in a Nutshell (O'Reilly, 2002) and SSCLI Essentials (O'Reilly, 2003). Ted was a member of the JSR 175 Expert Group. He now frequently speaks on the conference circuit and to user groups all over the world. He continues to develop and teach courses on Java and .NET.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (September 5, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321130006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321130006
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #852,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ted Neward is the Principal with Neward & Associates, a firm specializing in enterprise consulting, developer mentoring, and research/prototype development on both the Java and .NET platforms. He focuses on programming languages, virtual machines, enterprise systems, and the role of psychology and philosophy in software development. He speaks at conferences around the world, writes for a variety of different journals including columns with IBM's developerWorks, Microsoft's MSDN, and Oracle's TechNet periodicals. He resides in the Pacific Northwest, with his family.

You can view his website at http://www.tedneward.com; contact him if you have interest in having him consult on a project, mentor your developers, or speak on a subject to your firm directly.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
45 of 56 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Well written but of little actual value February 3, 2005
Format:Paperback
I feel kind of lonely here; everyone else seemed to love this book. Looking at the table of contents, I was very excited when I started reading the book. However, while reading it cover to cover I slowly became more and more dis-illusioned with it.

The book is divided up into a number of recommendations, called items, in a manor similar to Effective C++ and Practical Java. The problem is that most of the items appear to fall into one of a few general catagories:

1) Intro level generalities of good design for the web.

e.g.

- pass data in bulk - multiple asynchronous calls out of process are more expensive than one big call

- make deployment as simple as possible - exactly what it says!

- use [...] sparingly - this is web application design 101

- always validate user input - my personal favorite; who today is not validating user input received from the web?

2) Using a pair of items to represent a classic design best practice.

e.g.

- Lazy-load infrequently used data & Eager-load frequently used data

- Consider using optimistic concurrency for better scalability & Consider using pessimistic concurrency for explicit concurrency control

3) Re-statements of some of the principals of secure coding

e.g.

- Security is a process, not a product

- Remember that security is not just prevention, aka "fail securely"

- Assume insecurity, aka "grant minimal trust necessary"

- Establish a threat model

My copy of this book has long been in the trash. Save your money. Here are a couple of free online articles to get you started:

Secure coding: [...]

Article on stopping SQL injection: [...]
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book and worthy successor in a wonderful series November 27, 2004
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book that does not disappoint in any way. It is full of wonderful well-written content. The book is organized as a series of 75 essays, each running from 1 to 10 pages. Each essay gives advice on what to do or not do in an enterprise Java application.

Since I'm not a fan of Enterprise JavaBeans, before I received the book I was worried that the "enterprise" in the title might mean the book was focused on concerns of EJB developers. That isn't the case at all and the vast majority of the book is absolutely applicable if you avoid EJB in favor of lighter-weight frameworks such as Sping.

Recently I was working with a team whose application was running out of memory and causing their application server to crash, sometimes in as little as an hour. With the help of this book's sections on the garbage collector they were able to identify and resolve the problems within a day, which was much shorter than everyone had expected.

This book is a wonderful successor to Scott Meyers' "Effective C++" and I recommend it highly.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Effective, Efficient and Convenient October 25, 2004
Format:Paperback
If you have had a chance to see Ted speak, you have a sense of what to expect from this book: insight, amusement and a touch of controversy. Seasoned professionals will find themselves nodding at most of the items in this book. Folks from the trenches knowing this material is good news however; you wouldn't want to be faced with a deluge of maverick advice in something donning the title "Effective". What those types of engineers will find so useful is the convenient collection and organization of advice with which they can efficiently reassess their designs, communicate with peers, etc. Far from being a simple collection of didactic nuggets, however, there is exposition and justification behind the suggestions Ted makes. More junior engineers will find a series of rungs and footholds with which to scale the wall of enterprise Java. Beyond reading techniques that make sense and learning new approaches to solving common Enterprise problems, chances are your conventional wisdom will be challenged by at least one of the recommendations (like #11 did to me).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for J2EE design September 30, 2004
Format:Paperback
Neward writes at an engagingly sophisticated level about many problems that arise when using J2EE. He offers 75 "items". (O'Reilly publisher would probably call these "hacks".) Unusually for a computer book these days, there does not appear to be a single diagram. Just pages of text, interspersed with an occasional code snippet. But not dry. He leavens it with a low key wit.

A lot of items relate to having EJBs in your system, and the scalability and redundancy issues that arise when you want to improve one or both. Another topic given careful study is security. He shows the danger of blithely accepting client side input from an HTML form, without filtering it on the server side. This has to be done, even if you have written the equivalent filters for your client code. Because on the physical client machine, you must assume that all your client side tests can be circumvented. A simple example is given of how a cracker can try to break into your server's SQL database, by injecting SQL code into input text fields. In general, and not just for input from HTML forms, he suggests making a Java class, "TaintedString", that has filters which can validate a suspect input string. You might give this idea some consideration.

In general, the book is at a level of complexity that may hit the right chords, if you are struggling with J2EE design issues.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Book could be zipped into a tenth of the size.
The book has too much of unwanted commentary, to be called as a technical book. He showed his unwanted English language narrative skills. Read more
Published on July 13, 2007 by S. Pittala
5.0 out of 5 stars sage distributed computing wisdom
I've developed software for over 20 years and most of that has been middle-ware and distributed software systems. I've done the gamut from C++/DCOM to ASP. Read more
Published on August 5, 2006 by Roger D. Voss
5.0 out of 5 stars Great guide about enterprise architectures for ANY PLATFORM
This is an excellent book that should be read by anyone working with enterprise applications -distributed ones in particular- no matter if they are using Java, J2EE, . Read more
Published on March 12, 2006 by Martin Salias
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent tip collection
"Effective Enterprise Java" is similar in format and quality to "Effective Java." It is written at a higher level as it applies to J2EE systems, rather than the Java language. Read more
Published on October 9, 2005 by Jeanne Boyarsky
4.0 out of 5 stars Great but...
Yes, you can learn to be a better Java architect or programmer. But you only learn a lot if you haven't before. Read more
Published on May 11, 2005 by Simon Russo
5.0 out of 5 stars Best practices for developing enterprise Java systems
An excellent compendium of best practices for developing enterprise Java-based systems. Even if you already know some of this stuff (as experienced Java folks will) you will still... Read more
Published on February 8, 2005 by Bill
5.0 out of 5 stars A skillfully written guide to the nuances of Java 2 Platform
Expert software architect and consultant Ted Neward presents The Complete Idiot's Guide To Making Effective Enterprise Java, a sourcebook filled cover to cover with tips, tricks,... Read more
Published on December 12, 2004 by Midwest Book Review
5.0 out of 5 stars We all need a mentor
As anyone who has programmed using Servlets, JSPs, and EJBs knows, the complexities of integrating multiple layers of code can drive you to distraction. Read more
Published on November 15, 2004 by Thomas Paul
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent insight of some of the critical architectural issu
I have just finished reading some of the items from this book. The feeling is awesome. After spends quite a bit of time in developing and understanding enterprise application, it... Read more
Published on October 29, 2004 by Abanindra Nath Sarkar
5.0 out of 5 stars Pragmatic advice for J2EE developers
I like this book a lot. It's contains the type of practical and pragmatic advice that gets applications off the ground, and effectively defuses the rocket that propels architecture... Read more
Published on October 13, 2004 by Jack D. Herrington
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