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  • Egg Cuber Square Egg Press
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Egg Cuber Square Egg Press

by SCI

List Price: $12.37
Price: $7.09 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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Only 13 left in stock.
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  • Makes Square Hard-Boiled Eggs
  • Clear Plastic Construction
4 new from $4.50

Frequently Bought Together

Egg Cuber Square Egg Press + Plastic Egg Mold Heart and Star + Kotobuki Plastic Egg Mold, Rabbit and Bear
Price for all three: $12.07

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Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B002C8ZDQE
  • Item model number: P8322
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,940 in Kitchen & Dining (See Top 100 in Kitchen & Dining)
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Product Description

Create an interesting garnishing effect by transforming a round egg into a square egg. Sturdy clear plastic design. As seen on Rachael Rays TV show and site. Great for stacking eggs on a buffet, bento boxes, and childrens lunches. Make deviled eggs that do not roll around. A great conversation piece. Garnish your salads with square eggs.


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

It's easy and best yet, it works!
Jim Jacobson
This is a fun tool to make some square eggs.
Nancy Oliver
All my hardboiled eggs are now square.
William Ekhardt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
Length: 3:47 Mins
I heard about this cuber after I made a review of a square egg ring for fried eggs. After a while I decided to give it a shot. It's a lot of fun but it takes a little playing around with before you get consistent results. Here is what I have learned in addition to what is on this video:

1. Eggs will hard boil better if they are at least two weeks old.

2. The quicker that you cube the egg after it is cooked the squarer the yolk will be.

3. It is best to cool the egg (in ice water) after it is in the mold for 10 or 15 minutes.

I thought that a video review could better show how to use this little gadget. I have used it to make appetizers however I think that it would also be great for lunch and Bento boxes. I hope that this review is helpful to you.

Square Egg Ring, Stainless Steel, 4 x 4''
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By iBeth on June 7, 2010
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Apparently I had better luck with this than previous reviewers. The press definitely cubed my eggs, although the edges and corners were slightly rounded--they looked like big dice. Here's what I did: I used "old" eggs that I'd purchased a couple of weeks ago, because older eggs are easier to peel. I steamed 6 eggs for 17 minutes (I prefer to steam rather than hard-boil because there's no bouncing around in the pot). While the eggs were steaming, I stuck the egg cuber in the freezer and filled a big bowl with ice and water.

When the eggs finished, I peeled and cubed each egg one at a time. I noticed that if the eggs were still hot when I decanted them from the press, the egg would spring back to a more rounded shape, so while each egg was inside, I dunked the bottom part of the cuber (up to the bottom edge of the lid) into the ice water for 1-2 minutes. Then I decanted the cubed egg, put it on a plate, peeled the next, stuck it in the cuber, dunked the cuber into the ice water, etc. I was able to cube all six eggs with no problem. The last egg was plenty hot when I cubed it, so probably I could have cubed more.

The longer the press was dunked in the ice water, the better the eggs held their cubed shape. I'll probably experiment to see if I can get the corners and edges sharper, but with the above procedure, the eggs were cubical enough to surprise my kids.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Banana on December 1, 2010
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I don't recall how I came across the idea of an egg cuber but the idea of turning food into unnatural shapes fancy. I love people's reactions to them - when asked where I get them, I usually say "Square Chickens" :)

The shipping of this item was fairly quick- I received it 3 days after I ordered it. The packaging wasn't the best though- it was practically falling out of a thin cardboard envelope with fold in flaps (it arrived unscathed).

The cuber itself is very easy to use- it is only 4 pieces total- the "frame", a flat square that goes on the inside bottom, the piece that presses the egg down, and screw top that presses that piece into the egg. When you pull the egg out, it is a good idea to start to cool it in your fridge/freezer immediately or it might start to bulge out in one side.

I have used this many times over the months- whether for cubing an egg for my lunch bento or making deviled eggs. If working on more than one egg it does require lots of patience, but I find it enjoyable. Also, I recommend medium eggs- you don't want small or jumbos.

To cube mass amounts of eggs (I only do this for deviled eggs), I set up an "assembly line" in my kitchen sink.
First, I chill the cuber in the freezer for 20 minutes.
Then, fill up a single serving sized soup tupperware 2/3 with ice, and the rest of the way with ice cold water.
Peel your egg, put it in the press, dip it into the ice cold water and let it sit at least 30 seconds. I start peeling the 2nd egg during this time. Pull the cubed egg out of the press and submerge it in the ice water. Then pop the 2nd egg in the cuber. When I get to my 3rd egg, I pull the 1st one out of the water and set it on a paper towel to set.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dallee on September 16, 2010
Verified Purchase
Great for making square eggs -- the yolk takes on a square shape also, by the way.

The more negative reviewers probably did not leave the egg in the press long enough. In fact, if you make square eggs frequently, you might want more than one press. I put my egg-filled press in th fridge for at least an hour. The resulting square does not lose its shape.

The press is really nicely made. There is a little loose square in the bottom, which allows you to push the egg out. The screw on top is round and, when screwed on, pushes down on a separate little square "pusher."

Unlike the egg presses which make other shapes (star, heart, etc.), this press can be used on any size egg.

I just love slicing a square egg into nice even slices, perfect for a cracker and adding a topping (caviar? homemade mayo? lots of choices here!).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alexander Cochran on May 19, 2010
If your cooking has matured past the mcfood stage, then you may find this tool to be a wonderful addition to your kitchen. It takes a hard boiled egg and makes it square. Once cooled in the squarer, the egg more or less holds the square shape. I recommend getting a couple so when you hard boil some eggs you can square a few and drop them in ice water for several minutes then do another batch while the others are still hot.

It makes particularly interesting Chinese Tea eggs. After hardboiling regular eggs, crack the shells but dont peel them. Now make some very strong tea or add other spices you like or even food coloring. Now, reboil the cracked cooked eggs for about an hour. When they have taken on adequate color through the cracks in the shells, peel one and use the egg squarer on it. I put the squarer in ice water to chill out while the other tea eggs continue to simmer and take on more color and flavor. One at a time I square them while doing cutting kneeding and other prep work in the kitchen. Eventually, very pretty colored square eggs, but you need to be doing other stuff too because it takes several minutes for each egg to cool adequately to hold its shape.

Even the Easter Bunny would be proud of these colorful eggs that wont roll away. Guaranteed to break the ice at your next party, or get a smile from your favorite sweetie.
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