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Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth: An Evaluation of Ehrman s Did Jesus Exist? Paperback – April 16, 2013


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Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth: An Evaluation of Ehrman s Did Jesus Exist? + Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth + How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: American Atheist Press; First Edition edition (April 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578840198
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578840199
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #358,993 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Once again - not a biblical scholar.
Frank Lakeman
Unfortunately, the articles are talkative, emotional, nitpicky and extremely repetitive.
Ashtar Command
I'm sure quite a few others won't either.
Malleus Maleficarum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

129 of 150 people found the following review helpful By Timothy R. Campbell on April 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
"ONCE UPON A TIME..."
BART EHRMAN AND THE QUEST OF THE HISTORICAL JESUS OF NAZARETH
Edited by Frank R. Zindler and Robert M. Price
Published by American Atheist Press 2013
Review by Tim Campbell

Once upon a time there was a man named Jesus who lived in Nazareth in Galilee.

Or maybe not.

I was raised in a religious home (Roman Catholic) and even when I began my journey away from religion (I am now an atheist and do not believe in tribal gods), my inclination was to accept the dogma that there was at least a historical Jesus. I did not believe that he was any sort of divine magic being sent to Earth by God to die in order to save me from my sins--that premise fell down hard when I was about 18. But I always figured that there was a historical figure lurking as the basis for the myths. An ordinary human man who was insignificant during his lifetime, but whose significance grew-or originated-- as gospel writers and epistle writers and later church apologists added layers of myth and magic to his story until eventually the Jesus of doctrine and the Jesus of history were two entirely different men, joined in given name only!

However, there has been a wave of predominantly atheist or agnostic scholars who have looked at the Bible and at other sources and have concluded that not only was the magic Jesus the product of imagination, so too was the historical man! Such writers as Robert M. Price, Frank Zindler, Richard Carrier, Earl Doherty, David Fitzgerald, and others have become the modern vanguard of the so-called Jesus Myth movement. These folks have brought expertise in different fields and different levels of expertise to the field.
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51 of 62 people found the following review helpful By living42day on May 15, 2013
Format: Paperback
In 2009 (a point in time when I had been reading historical Jesus research for almost forty years) I came across a little book entitled The Historical Jesus: Five Views (edited by James K. Beilby and Paul Rhodes Eddy). Four of the five views in that book were so well known to me that I was tempted to return the volume to its place on the bookstore shelf. There was one view, however, that demanded further attention--the view of Robert M. Price "that it is quite likely there never was any historical Jesus" (55). Since reading Price's essay, I've continued to be intrigued by that argument (but I'm not yet fully convinced).

So, when I recently discovered the new book Bart Ehrman and the Quest of the Historical Jesus of Nazareth: An Evaluation of Ehrman's Did Jesus Exist? I bought the Kindle edition and read it. Sadly, in my view, it did not live up to its billing. Let me explain my disappointment.

Like the contributors to this book, I had hoped for more from Ehrman's book Did Jesus Exist? For example, he certainly could have (and arguably should have) provided his readers a fuller introduction to the work of mythicist researchers (the common designation of those who argue that there never really was an historical Jesus). Nevertheless, Ehrman did provide his audience (educated non-specialists) an adequate summary of the current "scholarly consensus." And it is on that little phrase that I focus my critique of this collection of responses to Ehrman's book.

That there is a long-standing scholarly consensus that Jesus did exist is a fact. If Al Gore were describing the situation, he might call it "an inconvenient truth.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book is a rebuttal to Bart Ehrman's 2012 book "Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth," (DJE?), and it is the work of seven mythicist scholars whom Ehrman strongly criticized in that book. Authors of the book include Richard Carrier, D.M. Murdock, Earl Doherty, David Fitzgerald, Robert M. Price, Rene Salm, and Frank R. Zindler. Taken together, the work of the seven scholars comprises more than 600 pages and constitutes an impressive critical analysis and rebuttal to Ehrman's book.

Price offers a lengthy prospective introduction that effectively identifies the most important points and arguments of all the chapters of the book. He then contributes the first chapter, "Bart Ehrman: Paradigm Policeman," that argues that Ehrman is unable to escape the frame of reference of old-time Historical-Jesus scholars in order to embrace the new paradigm that seeks to create a genuine science of Christian origins.

Fitzgerald takes an amusing critical approach by quoting Ehrman's earlier, solid, scholarly works against his later DJE? D.M. Murdock presents photographic evidence that proves the existence of the "Phallic Savior of the World Hidden in the Vatican," something Ehrman said never existed and accused her of fabricating. Carrier, in a lengthy, carefully reasoned critique, shows that Ehrman simply was not up to the task of proving the historicity of Jesus of Nazareth and that DJE? Is a scholarly disaster as compared to the impeccable scholarship of his earlier works. Earl Doherty shows that Ehrman "reads the Gospels into the Epistles" and takes an anachronistic approach.
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