Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $3.40 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book has marks or highlighted on some pages.Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided in your Amazon account with every order.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Einstein: A Life Paperback – August 7, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0471193623 ISBN-10: 0471193623 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $21.55
34 New from $5.42 126 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.55
$5.42 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 536 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (August 7, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471193623
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471193623
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,245,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With his halo of white hair, Albert Einstein looked the part of the century's secular saint, and Brian quotes a child asking, "Is that the Lord?" As the successor to Copernicus and Newton in revolutionizing concepts of the physical universe, Einstein was possibly the next best thing. Aside from awkward paragraph transitions and some lazy shortcuts that use parts of interviews verbatim, Brian's anecdotal biography, with just enough science to make Einstein's achievements persuasive, humanizes the icon, whose private life was guarded by zealous executors after his death at 76 in 1955. Once Einstein's elegantly audacious relativity theory emerged in 1905, when he was an obscure 26-year-old Swiss Patent Office examiner, he was on his way to a reputation as "the Columbus of science," his every scrap of paper so treasured that some of his checks were not cashed. In a few strokes of his pen?E=MC2?he revolutionized physics, explaining, "Time and space and gravitation have no separate existence from matter." Despite years of resistance from scientific and political reactionaries, deftly dramatized by Brian, observed phenomena would validate Einstein's equations. After his Nobel Prize in 1922, he unsuccessfully chased the holy grail of physics, a "unified field theory" that might mesh electromagnetism with gravitation. No more successful were his two marriages or his parenting. Eager to prove that the liberal, sometimes naive Jewish refugee from the Nazis was disloyal to his adopted country, J. Edgar Hoover would compile a 1160-page file, what Brian calls a jumble "of fact and fantasy, of lies, rumors, and ravings"?the largest and most unreliable of the dozens of biographies of Einstein. More the life than the work, Brian's unworshipful account is genial and judicious.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The making of the mythology of Albert Einstein began well before his death and shows no sign of abating. One of these books aims to cut through the myth; the other to capitalize on it. Brian's ambitious and well-researched work is a refreshing change from the recent glut of revisionist Einstein biographies, like Roger Highfield and Paul Carter's tawdry The Private Lives of Albert Einstein (LJ 5/1/94). Brian does a fine job of depicting the man, not the myth. Each of his 42 vividly detailed chapters covers a very specific period in Einstein's life. Brian is strong in covering the full range of Einstein's personal, political, and professional activities, and he offers insight into his thinking. This is not, however, a scientific biography, and little is offered by way of explanation of his theories. For that, the best work remains Abraham Pais's Subtle Is the Lord: The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein (LJ 8/82). Still, most general readers will probably prefer the personal, nontechnical style of Brian's book. Recommended for all libraries. Eddington's Essential Einstein is, essentially, fluff. It contains around 90 duotone photographs, in which Einstein is shown as gentle, unkempt, avuncular, eccentric, and visionary?in short, it portrays all of the standard characteristics of the Einstein image that permeates popular culture. Next to the photos are quotes taken from his speeches and writings. True, many of the photos are captivating, so buy this book for your coffee table if you want, but not for your library.?Gregg Sapp, Univ. of Miami Lib., Coral Gables, Fla.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

A must read for all biography fans.
Eugene S. Aguirre
This book is very well researched and presents a very accurate account of his life from begining to end.
Chad A. Lauterbach
You will find out facts, some of them will not enlighten you but at the same time, he was only human.
Einstein Fan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By D. Wolf on November 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
In this very readable biography, Brian conveys an extraordinary amount of information about Einstein's personal life so that the reader gets a real sense of what it must have been like to be around him.
Einstein's brilliance as a scientist did not turn him into a snob even tho' he clearly recognized that he had extraordinary abilities. He was both amused and repulsed by the trappings of celebrity that came with his status. Brian makes clear that Einstein was a kind man, a good friend, and a mediocre husband and father. The same man who labored intently over both scientific and social issues apparently put little effort into his family life. Brian does an excellent job of relating Einstein's family, social, and business world.
The 2 areas where this otherwise good biography falls short are the lack of context about Einstien's scientific achievements and the inadequate treatment of his interaction with other leading scientists outside of social and business matters. To the first matter, the book doesn't address why the theory of relativity mattered. He explains that it is a different model of the universe than what Newton defined centuries earlier; but, he leaves out any discussion of the impact. Similarly, the importance Einstein's quest for a unified theory is identified as an activity, but not why it was an important one. Brian never addresses why Einstein resisted Heisenberg's theories with such vehemence and for so long? The author provides little of Heisenberg, Bohr, or Plank's perspective of Einstein.
If you know the science already, this book is an excellent intrduction to the man. If you only know that Einstein was a "really smart guy," but not why his contributions mattered, then this is not the book for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By bill_taylor1@msn.com on July 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book covers the full spectrum of one of the worlds greatest minds. From his difficult time conforming as a young student, through the financial trials and trial of the heart. For those, like myself, who veiwed Einstein strickly as a scientist, this book will prove as a valuable tool to gain an understanding of his life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Y. Kaynar on February 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I'm a big fan of biographies, and have read many, and I can easily rank this one in top 5. It's definetely the definitive biography of Einstein for those that want to get to know Einstein almost on a personal level. The amount of detail is just right and he's never portrayed as a God which other biographers have tried to do. I definetely recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Christopher M. Adams on July 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Brian writes an admirable biography on a fascinating man. The books is a bit short on discussing Einsteins thoughts or analysing what led him to his theories. But it gives much background on his private life, much of which was unknown until recently. A good read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is quite a good book about his life and history. Although, if you are looking for an explanation of his theories, this wouldn't be it. It's very easy to read and has a very good insight
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gary C. Marfin on March 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
People who know nothing about Einstein's ideas, nonetheless have ideas about Einstein -- his life, habits, subjects he flunked, and so on. The principal benefit of Mr. Brian's text is its ability to convey a dispassionate objective rendering of Einstein, organized almost as a yearly diary, with each chapter covering a set number of years in the life of this great scientist. It is, as other revewers have noted, a remarkably readable book. One doesn't look here, however, for the scientific contribution -- this is, as the title says, A Life. Einstein's life, though, for all his tendency and capacity for concentrating like a laser on whatever problem he worked, was very much a social life. He made friends quickly, surrounded himself with students quite often, had more than his share of challenges with the many women in his life, and was deeply affected by the wave of anti-semitism that characterized so much of his most productive years. Portrayed in these pages, in other words, is a profoundly human Einstein. In many respects, quite the ordinary man with extrordinary intellectual capacities. Nominated 8 times in 11 years for the Nobel Prize, he was denied the prize, partly because of the anti-semitism of one of the Committee's members, and partly because, well, the Committee was not sure they understood what he was saying. That itself, is an indication of his vision. So, March 14, the year his birth -- Happy Birthday Albert!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Einstein Fan on December 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
I started reading about Einstein about 1 year ago and once I read the first book my hunger for knowledge about this person grew so I picked up this book by Denis Brian. I've read a few books about Albert Einstein, "Creator and Rebel" by Banesh Hoffmann, "Der private Albert Einstein by Peter Bucky", "Am Sonntag kuess ich Dich muendlich" by Albert Einstein & Mileva Maric, "Einstein sagt" & "Die Welt wie ich sie sehe" by Albert Einstein. I've enjoyed all these books yet none of them really gave me a big glimpse at who Einstein really was (except for his quotes and his love letters to Mileva, but that's only one side of him). Some of these books attempted to portray the private Einstein but at the same time were careful not to show to much or hide things which weren't thought of proper at the time of publishing (what happened to the Media since then ? ;-) Denis Brian tries to uncover this very private person and does so successfully considering how well protected Einstein was from the public by his close friends, co-workers and neighbors. If you are out for "dirt" on this great scientist, you have the wrong book. You will find out facts, some of them will not enlighten you but at the same time, he was only human. But if you are out for scandalous news about him, forget it, you won't find it here. Back to this book, I found it to be very informative but definitely not boring, very entertaining and delightful. You will catch yourself laughing out loud or snickering at some of the things Einstein said or did and he will remind you of the kid next door, very down to earth. Anyway, I could go on and on, but I really would like to recommend this book.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?