Customer Reviews


12 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exhausting but stunning book of an amazing life
The first time I read this book I felt as though I'd been pulled through a wringer. But I've gone back to it many times as I've learned more about these people.

We're still learning new information about the Roosevelts as correspondence is still popping up. I've read most the major bios of the man and I have to say that the more I read the more I admire him,...
Published on August 31, 2008 by PlanktonEater

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Roosevelts, Franklin and Eleanor
This is a rather detailed biography of Eleanor Roosevelt's life from childhood to the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The book is based on letters exchanged between the two of them throughout their lives. It was a little too detailed for me, but was worth the read. A bit on the dry side, I'm afraid.
Published on July 27, 2012 by Penny


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exhausting but stunning book of an amazing life, August 31, 2008
By 
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
The first time I read this book I felt as though I'd been pulled through a wringer. But I've gone back to it many times as I've learned more about these people.

We're still learning new information about the Roosevelts as correspondence is still popping up. I've read most the major bios of the man and I have to say that the more I read the more I admire him, but the less I like him. Clementine Churchill, of all people, thought FDR the most self-centered/egotistical man she ever met. THAT's saying something! And he was.

Eleanor is a constant source of wonder. I read Blanche Wiesen Cook's "Eleanor Roosevelt, Vol. 1" before I read this, and most folks should probably do the same as Lash's book is a great deal in one gulp.

But when the book is over you realize that the Roosevelts truly belonged in the White House as few have.

An amazing read about an amazing life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the brilliant political marriage, told a bit too discretely, October 8, 2010
By 
Robert J. Crawford (Balmette Talloires, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
This is an exceptional political biography of one of the greatest teams of the 20C. You have FDR, a man of protean energies and charisma, coupled with a wife who brought her own talents and passions to the union. Though he was out in front, Eleanor clearly was a great force in the background, a conscience, choosing her causes, pushing Franklin, and staking out positions with great courage.

Unlike Roosevelt biographies up to this point, Eleanor dominates this one, with FDR's career a kind of frame of the development of her mind and activism. As daughter of Teddy Rooseveldt's elder brother - an alcoholic wastrel whom she loved and feared for - she was born to privilege, position, and private pain. There is a wonderfully horrific scene depicted when she witnessesed, as a pre-teen, her father get drunk in a club and then carried out, a humiliation that marked her deeply.

FDR chose her for marriage, in what Lash describes as a prescient political move: even though she was not as beautiful as the many available debutants of their class and milieu, she would support him and play her role to perfection as he entered electoral politics, subtly guiding him with an equal political genius. They came to embody the New Deal and all the reforms and experiments that period entailed, though again the details of this are in only the background of the book.

Interestingly, Lash covers how burdensome she found her role personally, how it wore her down emotionally and caused her to despair at the moment he was elected president. In this version, she was also unhappy with the intimate side of the marriage: she found sex a burden to bear, finally discovering that FDR was having an affair with her social secretary and friend, Lucy. This was the end of a phase of their relationship, when it became purely political and she started to pursue her own ambitions and projects, which required the same level of energy as did those of FDR. But she was always a quantity in formation and in motion - I will never forget about her decision, while in the car to the inauguration, to do something with her life when she heard the complaints of Hoover's wife, who said she was upset that everything wasn't going to be "done for her" anymore.

What Lash is so discreet about is Eleanor's own affairs with FDR's body guard in Albany and later with women. He indicates them only as an unproven possibility, when in fact there is ample evidence in other sources that essentially prove liasons. I know this from a personal connection with researchers who have proved this to me. Perhaps this somewhat puritan attitude dates the book, but it also avoids sensationalizing these relations at the expense of a deeper portrait of the times. This is my principal criticism of the book.

Recommended warmly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thoughtful, Well Balanced Biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, September 25, 2011
By 
Whetstone Guy (Montgomery Village, MD) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
I wanted to read a biography of Eleanor Roosevelt (ER) partially because my deceased mother had told me that ER was a great woman. I totally agree with my mother.

I walk away after reading the book with knowledge of ER's talents, strengths, and faults (not too many faults) and her relationship with her husband Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) and many other individuals, particularly FDR's mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt.

ER gave more than she got from FDR. Even though FDR betrayed ER by his adulterous relationship with Lucy Mercer prior to being stricken by polio, without ER's remarkable efforts, FDR would have been an invalid emotionally as well as physically after he was stricken.

FDR's marriage with ER was irrevocably damaged after ER learned about FDR's affair with Lucy Mercer. Estrangement within a marriage is sad. After FDR became President (he was President for a little over 12 years) ER and FDR spent a signifcant amount of time apart. ER did not like to go to Warm Springs, Georgia, which FDR found therapeutic. ER even had her own place called Val-Kill at New Hyde Park. And when FDR went to one of Bernard Baruch's homes in South Carolina to rest, he did not take ER with him. Also, both ER and FDR traveled without each other on different political matters. And after ER learned about FDR's affair with Lucy Mercer, ER and FDR had separate bedrooms.

The author, Joseph Lash, a friend of ER, was chosen by FDR Jr., who was ER's literary executor, to write this book. Mr. Lash, an ex-reporter, writes objectively and discreetly about ER and about FDR. FDR was an excellent president (the Allies defeated Germany, Italy, and Japan in a very methodical manner), but he was spoiled, emotionally and materially, as a child. Also, presumably because of FDR's family wealth and position, he was selected by Josephus Daniels, the Secretary of the Navy to President Woodrow Wilson, to be Mr. Daniels' deputy, called Assistant Secretary. FDR was on a political life's fast track, by virtue of being born to the right parents. The author notes, via a quote from Missy LeHand, FDR's longtime secretary, that FDR really had no close friends in life. On Christmas eve, ER asked FDR if he had telephoned Miss LeHand, who was in the hospital recuperating slowly from a stroke. FDR said "no" and that he was not going to telephone Ms. LeHand. But FDR in his will had provided for Ms. LeHand's medical care if she had outlived FDR, which she did not. The point is that FDR was not uncaring but he could not or did not want to open himself emotionally.

If you are interested in learning about Eleanor Roosevelt, I highly recommend this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eleanor and Franklin, a marvelous biography, December 23, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
This biography is one of the best I have ever read. It is intimate, in that the author knew Eleanor in her later years,sensitive and well documented. The letters he had access to are wonderful to read also.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book about two great, decent people., May 8, 2008
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
Eleanor and Franklin were no only heroes to millions of Americans, they were people who attained power without losing their humanity. From the turn of the century, when Eleanor worked in Settlement Houses among the poorest of the poor in New York City's worst slums until they were in the White House implementing programs which would mitigate the suffering of the Depression: they were always on our side.
A great book about us and them, along with the TV Series "The Waltons" it proves that we were better people then.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best biography I've read even better than Churchill's, June 21, 2006
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
This is a bittersweet biography about Eleanor and Franklin that ends when FDR dies. Maybe that's why the novel is abit sad as it doesn't go on to Eleanor's triumphs post-FDR.

Yes, Eleanor is a goody two shoes, that we know. And that we know ultimately enriched mankind. Because this book is about relationships rather than policy, it is easy to imagine how annoying Eleanor's goody two shoes nature can be very annoying to FDR.

It is very tempting to pity Eleanor for FDR's infidelities in this book. I did but I know there was life after FDR for Eleanor so it eased my sadness.

Overall, a well-written book authored by a man who admired and respected his subjects.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars reading in progress, April 17, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
I have only had this book a short time ,this is an onging read ,but have liked what I've read so far.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cherished Gift!, February 16, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
Purchased this as a gift for my elderly father who is taken by
the Roosevelts and was part of history in the making - as her
development of the Arthurdale, WV community took their
"citizens" from the area where my dad was raised, but foreign
born (southern Europeans, as my dad's family are) were excluded!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Roosevelts, Franklin and Eleanor, July 27, 2012
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
This is a rather detailed biography of Eleanor Roosevelt's life from childhood to the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The book is based on letters exchanged between the two of them throughout their lives. It was a little too detailed for me, but was worth the read. A bit on the dry side, I'm afraid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very well written, May 9, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers (Hardcover)
I had read this book many, many years ago but after revisiting the miniseries based on the book I went to look for my copy and, alas, it had disappeared. So, went to Amazon to replace it. It's a heavy tome so pretty much has to be read in bed so you can rest it on your chest. But, it is a very good book about two of the most fascinating people who ever lived.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Eleanor and Franklin: The Story of Their Relationship, based on Eleanor Roosevelt's Private Papers
$60.00 $43.82
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.