Electric Circus (Explicit Version)

December 10, 2002 | Format: MP3

$5.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:48
30
2
4:12
30
3
4:54
30
4
5:28
30
5
4:20
30
6
4:35
30
7
5:08
30
8
5:30
30
9
4:54
30
10
6:23
30
11
5:12
30
12
8:32
30
13
10:24
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: December 10, 2002
  • Release Date: December 10, 2002
  • Label: MCA
  • Copyright: (C) 2002 Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:12:20
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000WLWU5U
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (157 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #68,693 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By P. Brown on January 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Electric Circus from Common is one of the must eccentric Hip Hop CD's that I have ever heard. As I was skimming through it my first impressing was "What in the world is this?" It was like Hip Hop was on an acid trip. Most of the beats had elements from the "seventies funk era." However I gave the CD another hear around, and listened to the lyrics and concept of the disc. Lyrically Common is very profound with expressing his stories, of Human Issues (Between Me, You & Liberation) & Love (Come Close). Out of 13 songs I enjoyed 8 (which is normal for me from a Common CD). The other 5 songs were okay, but either the production or lyrics got shuffled in the "Matrix", and lost my personal interest. I truly enjoyed this "collaged" of his interpretation of An "Electric Circus". It was something different and unique.

Lyrically Common is one of the "Ringleaders" in this Hip Hop madness. If you enjoy a "Mc Clown" who likes to brag about the people they killed, people they are sleeping with, and items they own then this CD is not for you. Only listeners with ability to enjoy "True Hip Hop" and doesn't settle for the regular "mode" of music could truly enjoy the message that the "Electric Circus" delivers.
My picks from this CD.
Song that will get you hyped and Jumping
Soul Power
Electric Wire Hustler
New Wave
Songs that will make your head swing (Mellow Madness)
Come Close (My Favorite)
I Am Music (Love The Beat and Jill Scott a is plus)
Aquarius (Hot)
Songs with a very deep message
Heaven (Long but food for thought)
Between Me, You & Liberation (Very Deep)
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By JOHNBLAZE on December 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
These days, it's pretty difficult for me to utter the word "perfection" in the music world. Aside from albums such as OutKast's "Aquemini", no album has ever really struck me as "perfect" - until now. Common has always been my favorite emcee, but I never expected this - never in a million years. Common has shown a type of growth and maturation the likes of which few have ever seen. His newfound maturity is easily seen on the lead single "Come Close" featuring none other than the infamous Mary J. Blige. When Common exclaims "The pimp in me/ it may have to die with you..." you get the feeling that he's serious this time. That's simply a taste of what on the album. I simply can't put into words the complexity of this album - every single track is a journey in itself. From "Electric Wire Hustler Flower" to "Star *69 (PS With Love)" to the stellar "Heaven Somewhere", you'll find that no part of this album is wasted on cliches and the usual barrage of mindless talk. Common, the hip-hop community thanks you for this album... Take a bow.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Timothy A. Dillinger on October 16, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I gave this CD five stars simply because Common stepped out of his comfort zone and made an album that HE wanted to make. Musically, it is very experimental, fusing hip-hop with jazz, rock, ragtime, new wave and R&B. Lyrically, perhaps his most daring work, with the centerpiece being "Between You, Me & Liberation" on which he tackles molestation, cancer and homophobia in three well-written verses (feauting the incredible Ceee-lo Green as well on vocals). "Come Close" with Mary J. Blige reveals a more sensitive side of Common...apparently startling to some, but it's a nice offset for the avant-garde atmosphere of the rest of the CD. Prince appears on "Star 69" and Erykah Badu on the journey of "Jimi Was a Rock Star". Not for the narrow-minded, but for true art lovers, you will love this piece of work.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By MzLilee on December 14, 2006
Format: Audio CD
...I love this album.

I'm a house head and a huge music fan of every genre I've heard so far except Lynyrd Skynyrd's take on Southern rock, most C&W and commercial hip hop. I think it's because I'm getting old, I'm Black and I'm (technically) bourgie. Anyway, I heard this album in someone's car, a younger someone who bought the album out of dedication to Common, but was seriously annoyed with this work. Out of 4 people in the car, I was the only one who was "ooohing and aaahing" because of the introduction and, thus, got the point of the album.

Hello. I'm a priest of Ocha and I love love LOVE that song for Ogun.

Ogun is the waymaker, the one who opens the path for (R)evolution, Development, New Things. I don't know much about hip hop beyond De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest and Doug E. Fresh, but this album made perfect sense to me. Musicians can and should do more than what their so-called genre says they should do. The world is too big for that. Shoot, Bed-Stuy is too big for that. Let's reclaim Jimi and Miss Ella from the suburbs and remake our selves in our own images (and I do mean that in the plural).

This is a great album.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By K. Reynolds on December 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
If you are a Common Sense fan, this album will satisfy you. If you enjoyed Com's approach on his previous album "Like Water For Chocolate", then you will love "Electric Circus". This album is really more of a fusion album than anything else, but this album's overall focus is centered around the advancement of Hip-hop music and culture all together. He definitely eludes towards progression on this album and indicates that he has matured ultimately and has grown into a musician. Artistically the album is strong and provides the listener with continuity in production, due to the Soulaquarians. But don't get it twisted, Comm hasn't forgotten where he came from, he's still a Chi-Town b-boy. Especially on songs like "Soul Power" produced by the slept on Jay DEE (J-Dilla), Comm just goes straight for the throat. On "I Am Music" featuring Jill Scott, Common and Jill make harmony over an up tempo jazzy groove as they speak to the listener and portray themselves as music from a first person perspective. On "Aquarius" Common proves they he can still serve the listener with a multitude of puchlines and wordplay. On "New Wave" The production is extremely brilliant with a futuristic feel to it.Ultimately you can't hate Common for what he is trying to do here. The album's only low points are evident on "Electric Wire Hustle Flower" feat Sunny from POD which is a sour sounding attempt to fuse industrial heavy metal with hip-hop. "I Got a Right To" featuring Pharell from the Neptunes isn't really a great one either, as much as you try to force yourself to like it I guarantee that most folks will skip it.Read more ›
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