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139 of 146 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Hendrix Album
After decades of listening to literally thousands of records and CDs, "Electric Ladyland" still holds a strong position in my list of top 5 recordings of all time. After two landmark albums of the psychodelic era, Hendrix reaches new heights of creativity in the incredible "double LP" release. The long version of Voodoo Chile, which features Steve...
Published on January 15, 2000 by Jazzseeker

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Gimmick...the 1997 remaster with new packaging.
Janie Hendrix, Jimi's adopted sister and sole heir to his music copyrights, dropped the MCA record label and signed a new contract for reissuing Jimi's catalog on Sony in 2010. It seems kinda ridiculous that every 2 or 3 years, whenever she wins a copyright lawsuit or decides to switch record labels, she "remasters" the entire catalog. How many victory reissues do we...
Published 23 months ago by FromABuick6


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139 of 146 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Hendrix Album, January 15, 2000
By 
Jazzseeker (New York State) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
After decades of listening to literally thousands of records and CDs, "Electric Ladyland" still holds a strong position in my list of top 5 recordings of all time. After two landmark albums of the psychodelic era, Hendrix reaches new heights of creativity in the incredible "double LP" release. The long version of Voodoo Chile, which features Steve Winwood and Jack Cassidy (bassist from the Jefferson Airplane), is one of the best hard blues jams of all time. Following a set of shorter titles, including the superb "Gypsy Eyes" and "Burning the Midnight Lamp", you are presented with another great blues jam --- "Rainy Day, Dream Away". Now that Jimi has your blood really flowing, he soothes you back to earth with the dreamy combination of "1983" and "Moon, Turn the Tides". You then soar back up with four more acid rock masterpieces, including the famous Hendrix cover of Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower". If you do not own any Hendrix albums, this is absolutely the one to get! You will not be disappointed.
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46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Electric brilliance, October 30, 2003
By 
Adam Rickards (Las Vegas, NV United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
When Jimi Hendrix's album Electric Ladyland was released in 1968, it blew all of the competition out of the water (including Jimi's previous two albums). First off, the scope of this album is stunning; so far reaching, in fact, that it was released as a double LP set, something that was fairly new at the time. However, even in 2003, listening to this album is still amazing as the listener often wonders "How did he get that sound?" or "How does he come up with this stuff?" I, for one, am absolutely in love with this album, and I think that this is his best effort (beating out "Are You Experiecnced" by just a fraction).
I have been listening to this album for about a year now, and I still haven't found all the little subtleties and nuances, so I won't dive into those too deeply, but they're there, believe me. The opening cut, "And the Gods Made Love" shows that Jimi was a master studio technician as well, mixing odd sounds and backwards tapes to give us something that sounds like wind blowing at first listen, but subsequent listens reveal odd sounds that weren't quite noticeable before, and there is even a tape of Jimi's voice that is slowed down and played backwards (rumor has it that he is saying "Ok, one more time" or something to that effect). Next we move into the second intro track, "(Have You Ever Been) to Electric Ladyland", in which Jimi soothes us with his voice, preparing us for the mind-blowing journey that lays ahead, which all comes crashing down on us with the blues-pop jam "Crosstown Traffic."
From here on, this album takes many twists and turns. The 17-minute blues jam "Voodoo Chile" sits next to a nice Noel Redding piece, the psychedelic pop "Little Miss Strange," on which Noel even gets the lead vocal. "Gypsy Eyes" and "House Burning Down" show a more fiery Jimi, while the cool-jazz/blues hybrid "Rainy Day, Dream Away" shows Jimi once again stretching his famous blues chops.
Amidst all of these diverse types of songs, there are a few which really stand out as not only masterpieces in Jimi Hendrix's repetoire, but also posess a beautiful, ethereal quality which cannot be expressed in mere words. The most obvious example of this is "1983...A Merman I should Turn Out to Be" which opens with a guitar intro that is blissfully beautiful in quality. If Jimi had always been a bit "spacey" musically, he really outdid himself here. After its initial reading of the introductory verses, the song gives way to an open, expansive, 13-minute psychedelic jam which features little of Jimi's guitar histrionics, but makes up for that in terms of feel and overall quality. This is Hendrix at his best and a definite highlight of this album. Another highlight would have to be, of course, Jimi's famous reading of Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower," which was the biggest hit from this album, and it's easy to see why since this is one of Jimi's best moments. When that guitar intro starts up, I always see a montage of Vietnam War footage in my head, as well as images of the counterculture that was going on on the homefront. Never before has a song so captured the element of its time and yet remained a timeless listen at the same time. Absolutely breathtaking. The final track, "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" is one of Jimi's best rockers and one of the best songs in his entire canon. Every time I hear this, I see images of Jimi performing this at his legendary Woodstock concert (if you haven't seen it, then you're missing out). "Burning of the Midnight Lamp" is another one of Hendrix's best songs; I can't tell if that's Jimi's guitar or a harpsichord from hell being used in that memorable intro. In fact, it's vaguely reminiscent of the intro to "Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds," which was issued the previous year.
If you are a fan of classic rock, hard rock, art-rock, or great music in general and you don't already own this, then I pose the question "Why not?" This record has everything, great songs, great guitar work, great production effects and above all, a fantastic musical vision. So don't hesitate to pick this masterpiece of an album, an album which is a true testament to Jimi Hendrix as a musician, and as a creative force in the studio as well. This is one of my all time favorites now, and I'm willing to bet that it will be one of yours too if you give it some time and a few good listens.
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74 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Go To Electric Ladyland, December 7, 2000
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
As influential as they are, it's hard to believe that The Jimi Hendrix Experience only released three albums. While each were brilliant in their own right, Electric Ladyland is their masterpiece. Originally released as a double album, it brimmed with inventive guitar work, suitably trippy lyrics and Mr. Hendrix's best vocal work. From the simplicity of "Have You Ever Been To (Electric Ladyland), to the fire of "Crosstown Traffic", to the psychedelia of "1983" to bizarre experimentation of "And The Gods Made Love", the album offers the listener as buffet of sounds. The two versions of "Voodoo Chile" are outstanding, the first version is a 15 minute jam with Steve Winwood and Jack Cassidy that burns up and the second has that famous wah-wah guitar riff. His take on Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower" gave him his only top forty hit. "Come On (Let The Good Times Roll)" and "Burning The Midnight Lamp" are two album cuts that don't alot of play, but rank up there with anything else on the album. Electric Ladyland is a musical landmark and it secured Jimi Hendrix's place as one of the giants in musical history.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Rock Music's High Points, March 22, 2006
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
I love the long albums. Electric Ladyland is one of classic rock's great double albums. (Its all contained on one disc now but it used to take vinyls to hold all the music contained herein.) Unfortunately this is the last studio album released in Jimi's all too short life time. However the fortunate thing is that it ranks as probably his greatest accomplisment.

The album begins with the thunder and strange sound effects of "And the Gods Made Love" before kicking into one of Jimi's classic ballads, "Electric Ladyland."

The rockin' "Crosstown Traffic" then gives way to the album's first epic, the slow blues burner "Voodoo Chile." (not to be confused with Voodoo Child.) The song is a nearly seventeen minute performance featuring blazing solos from Jimi and Traffic keyboard virtuoso Steve Winwood.

Track 5 written by Noel Redding is the album's only low point. Its a just a dated piece of cheesy pyschedelia. Fortunately Jimi's music makes up the remainder of the album. A couple of rockers followed by pyschedelic masterpieces "Gypsy Eyes" and "Burning of the Midnight Lamp" lead us to what truly makes this one of rock's greatest musical statements.

Beginning with the jazzy "Rainy Day, Dream Away," we are treated to some of the best pyschedelia ever put on record, the sci-fi epic "1983." This song is a orgy of guitars, flutes, and great studio sound effects.

The final three tracks are some of the finest Jimi ever commited to tape. "House Burning Down" reflects the political unrest of the time. "All Along the Watchtower," is one of those rare cases where a cover tune up stages the original. Considering that Bob Dylan is the one who is covered, this was no small feat. Closing the album is one of the all time greatest performances on the electric guitar. (the closest contender being another Jimi tune, "Machine Gun.") The song is of course "Voodoo Child." The song opens with a catchy wah-wah riff before becoming an electric storm of feedback and virtuosity. It is truly a definitive moment in the history of the guitar. "I'm standing next to a mountain, I chop it down with the edge of my hand..." nuff said
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the masterpiece of masterpieces, June 3, 2005
By 
LackOfDiscipline (FLAGSTAFF, AZ USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
Hendrix had few (if any) equals. This was his third official album, and it is quite simply one of the greatest works of art of the last 40 years. If you have little exposure to Hendrix and want to start with material that will dazzle you, move you, thrill you, etc. this is the place to start.

The most noteworthy tracks are in my opinion - Voodoo Chile, Rainy Day Dream Away, 1983 (A merman I should turn to be), Moon turn the tides ...gently gently away, All Along the Watchtower, Burning of the Midnight Lamp, Voodoo Child (slight return), and the title cut Electric Ladyland.

There was a period in my life (1991) where I basically listened to nothing but this album for about 6 months. I still go back to it often and experience the same sense of awe that I had when I first heard it. Despite the fact that I can anticipate every subtlety, I still gape at the beauty every time. May it be so for you as well...
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amzing. The best. Everthing else is derivitive of this...., November 25, 2006
By 
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
Want short catchy tunes?

Buy something else, the Experience Greatest Hits will do you nicely.

Short attention span? Need instant gratification? Sorry.

BUT

Want to hear what a Stratocaster can REALLY do? Want to hear it cry - scream - and then kick you right between the eyes? Then look no further.

Some here are not recomending this for beginers - I disagree. Hendrix was always at his best when he just let go and JAMMED. These tunes do not hem him in - he just explodes all over the place - it is pure music making. If you are not a guitarist (as I am), then you might perhaps get lost along the way. But, for me, this is still the Bible of six string genius.

Oh, and the Zippo cigarette lighter slide in Watchtower STILL gives me goosebumps.......

Buy it and realize 98% of everything made since is crap.......
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Gimmick...the 1997 remaster with new packaging., September 27, 2012
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
Janie Hendrix, Jimi's adopted sister and sole heir to his music copyrights, dropped the MCA record label and signed a new contract for reissuing Jimi's catalog on Sony in 2010. It seems kinda ridiculous that every 2 or 3 years, whenever she wins a copyright lawsuit or decides to switch record labels, she "remasters" the entire catalog. How many victory reissues do we need? Anyway, she decided to reissue these albums on CD in 2010, which not only generates buzz for guaranteed sales but, also makes her a lot more profit off Hendrix's name. She cares more about benefits from sales of the physical product more then about protecting the legacy of a great musician. Here's the truth... These are the 1997 remasters in new "earth-friendly" cardboard packaging with a worthless DVD. It's a 17 minute DVD with producer/engineer Eddie Kramer talking about Jimi and playing a snippet of a few songs. We've already heard the songs and know he's good. Nothing interesting or new. The albums should have gotten a fresh remaster for 2010 and the second disc could have been better utilized as bonus tracks, such as outtakes or live stuff. Even the booklets and disc labels themselves look exactly the same. If you bought the last remasters you don't need any of the main 3 studio albums, Band Of Gypsys, or First Rays. 5 stars for the album itself but, zero stars for the disc. This 2010 reissue is not a remaster and is definitely screwing the public.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Bigger Canvas, August 3, 2006
By 
J P Ryan (Waltham, Massachusetts United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
The Jimi Hendrix Experience, formed in September 1966 under the watchful and savvy eye and ear of ex-Animal Chas Chandler (who had been tipped off to one amazing guitarist tearing up NYC's Cafe Wha? by Keith Richards' girlfriend, after Stones' manager Andrew Oldham shortsightedly passed on the second great opportunity of his life) were musically a magificent outfit, more coherent than Cream, who onstage (not on record) could devolve into three soloists barely aware of each other. The Experience had Noel Redding as the bedrock rhythm player, letting Mitch Mithell and Jimi Hendrix's telepathic explorations take them and the audience through inner and outer space. After the explosive debut ("Are You Experienced?") and "Axis: Bold As Love", the band started to fracture. "Axis" may be Jimi's greatest single album, certainly it is the Experience's tightest, fleetest (13 songs just under 40 minutes), and most exquisite sounding work, and much of the imagination that needed four sprawling sides to express itself on "Eleectric Ladyland" was reigned in (by Chandler and perhaps Hendrix himself) but fully at peak powers on "Axis."

"Ladyland" is, of course, a classic, but with the recording process taking over a year ("Burning Of The Midnight Lamp" came first, July 1967, and they were back in the studio that December, immediatly after the completion of "Axis"), this drawn out process drove Chas Chandler - fed up with hangers on, drugs, and expensive studio hours wasted - to quit his role as producer, and frustrated Redding as well. If "Axis" is the trio at its best, "Ladyland" shows Jimi with a bigger canvas, a bigger budget, leaving the trio format behind as he starts collaborating with other musicians - most successfully, three members of Traffic and Jefferson Airplane's Jack Casady - but also many others who participated in these sessions, from Al Kooper to the Stones' Brian Jones to Electric Flag drummer Buddy Miles. Despite the well documented studio excess, there is little waste on the finished product. Sonically the album is all over the place, sometimes murky and almost muddy, a few minutes later exploding in hallucinatory raging power, and still elsewhere crisp and tight as anything on the first two albums. The original LP was indeed grey and drab sounding, and this review is intended for those who may have been skeptical of yet another cd issue or even (like me) analog devotees. But, with Eddie Kramer and George Marino working FOR THE FIRST TIME from original master tapes, this Hendrix album above all the other reissues ("Band Of Gypsys" would be a close second) benefits greatly from the new (1997) remastering. The sonic veil is lifted, and the album truly explodes from your hopefully halfway decent speakers: just turn the volume up on "Come On" or either Vodoo Chile/d", and you'll hear what I mean. Yes, it is more obvious than ever that many studios and sessions and multiple overdubs were involved, but this is as close to the master tape Jimi and Kramer delivered in September 1968 as we're likely to hear for a long time. And Jimi finally, whatever the frustrations of his compadres, didn't make a musical misstep. He honors Curtis Mayfield on the title track, New Orleans' Earl King on "Come On", even Jimmy Smith and what would be called acid jazz three decades later on the "Rainy Day" tracks.

The downside is this pretty much broke the camaraderie and unified spirit of the Experience. Noel Redding to these ears plays bass on perhaps as few as 4 or 5 tracks, with Jimi playing on many of the others and Casady making a grand cameo on the 15-minute "Voodoo Chile." The next year "Smash Hits" collected four previously unreleased early gems on a disc that was issued the same month the group broke up, and it is a fine retrospective that honors their tremendous accomplishments in two-and-a-half years. The group's last studio sessions left some strong tracks (on the box, "South Saturn Delta," and bits and pieces elsewhere). Band Of Gypsys lasted but a month or two before Jimi called Mitch Mitchell back, and two years after this album's release Jimi was still finishing up a successor, which would likely have come out in 1971 as something very close to "Cry Of Love" or "First Rays."

Be it on 180g vinyl or CD, this is the third great Experience album, sounding better than it did in 1968, and is thus essential.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top ten reasons to get Electric Ladyland, June 7, 2001
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
1. Crosstown Traffic- This is a humorous little ditty that compares a dead end love affair to a traffic jam. It doesn't have any of the Hendrix virtuoso playing, but it is still fun to listen to.
2. Voodoo Chile- Here we have an extended epic blues song with awesome guitar, organ, and drum solos. Absolute proof that Hendrix was child from the Delta, a Martian delta.
3. Come on (Let the Good Times Roll)- A lot of guitar players got their inspiration from the solos of this unpretentious rock song.
4. Burning of the Midnight Lamp- Quite a few rumors circulated that Hendrix used underwater guitar effects here.
5. Rainy Day, Dream Away- The duel between Hendrix and Freddie Smith, horn player, is more exciting than anything you'll see at a sporting event.
6. 1983- This song may have opened the doors of the progressive rock movement with its length, experimentation and bizarre, apocalyptic lyrics.
7. House Burning Down- Hendrix made a point about race riots with a science fiction analogy. It has some truly incredible sound effects at the end.
8. All along the Watchtower- It speaks volumes when a musician like Bob Dylan, who wrote the original version of this song, changes his own version to sound more like the remake.
9. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)- Forget about Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath. This is the real birth of heavy metal.
10. Check it out for every other song I didn't mention.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Legendary Music; Legendary Artist, September 5, 2003
By 
This review is from: Electric Ladyland (Audio CD)
Art-rockers King Crimson, Queen and Rush. The infamous gloom/metal/proto-grunge rockers Black Sabbath. Singer/songwriter Bonnie Raitt. Bluesy guitarists Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Robert Cray. Fusionesque rockers Living Colour and The Red Hot Chili Peppers. Heavy metal artists Skid Row and Metallica. A multi-talented wonder known as Prince, and Rapper Chuck-D of Public Enemy.
What purpose do I have for mentioning the aforementioned artists? What do they all have in common?
Simple. They all have mentioned Jimi Hendrix as an influence on their music. And if you think those are the only artists that claim Hendrix as an influence, think again! That's just the tip of the iceberg.
To be revered by typical music fans/ordinary blokes is complimentary enough, but to be revered by famous musicians - who have made considerable impact on many ordinary blokes with their music - is even more momentous and prestigious in my book. That, by my definition, makes a legendary, honorable musician.
ARE YOU EXPERIENCED? (1967) introduced the world to the phenomenal, enigmatic wizard, and his unique, fiery blend of rock, R&B, psychedelia and blues. AXIS: BOLD AS LOVE (1967) stretched out his diversity a bit more, and exhibited a more mellow side to Hendrix, while still showcasing some elements of the fiery rock he was well-known for.
However, on ELECTRIC LADYLAND (1968), Jimi's songwriting and musicianship evolve and soar into ecstatic heights never before reached. He even contributes bass and piano parts on this album. I believe it to be his absolute pinnacle, and is my personal favorite. The other two albums were powerhouses in many ways, of course, so I'm not denouncing them. ELECTRIC LADYLAND is a stunningly diverse, elaborate, well-crafted and well-executed album. It's vastness - in length, detail and emotion - equal that of a Mahler symphony. It's a nice balance between the otherworldly and the earthy - a spiritual record for Hendrix to an extent. As mentioned above, the album is overflowing with detail - so much so, that important subtleties can be missed, so I recommend listening to this on a good pair of headphones to get as much out of this album as possible.
Jimi was always an impressive guitarist, but most of the time, his flashy tricks seemed to overshadow his overwhelming talent as a brilliant songwriter and musician in general.
The opening track "...And The Gods Made Love" is a spacy number featuring wind-like effects. It also features Jimi saying "OK, one more time" backwards and in slow motion. "Have You Ever Been (To Electric Ladyland)" is a slow-grooving R&B number with small touches of psychedelia. It showcases Jimi's melodic, soulful vocals at their strongest, as well as some soul-wrenching guitar licks. "Crosstown Traffic" and "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" are probably prototypes for the hybrid of R&B/funk and hard rock/metal. The former is a fast, short number with Jimi almost rapping his vocal, but in a sophisticated way, while the latter is heavy and funky enough to make your soul do a forbidden, exotic dance (if not your body.) Tastefulness, heaviness, funkiness and spiritual-like soundscapes have never sounded as convincing, electrifying - and addicting - as this (at least not during that time period.)
I have not forgotten the backing rhythm section of bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell. Both were important musicians as well. They share vocals on the wah-wah (or what I call the 'wow-wow') pedal-soaked "Little Miss Strange," and Jimi does his fantastic cover of Earl King's "Come On (Let The Good Times Roll)," while "Long Hot Summer Night" showcases one of the many things Jimi was exceptionally well at - his tasteful licks. Two extended numbers can be found here as well: "Voodoo Chile" and "1983 (A Merman I Should Turn to Be.)" The former is a 15-minute progressive blues workout featuring famed musician Steve Winwood (Traffic) on organ, and Jack Casady replacing Noel Redding on bass (Noel wasn't too happy about that.) Passionate, intense and moving - it's almost an overwhelming listen (as with the rest of the album.) The latter is a 13-minute mixture of proto-prog rock epic and psychedelic proportions. Mystical, elegant, ethereal, otherworldly and verbose - this shows off Jimi's lyrical brilliance, as it's almost poetic in nature. The music takes on near-classical attributes in it's arrangement, space and depth.
Elsewhere, "House Burning Down" is a passionate rocker based on social commentary. Jimi stated that he wanted some of the guitar effects to sound like it (the guitar) was on fire, and his attempt to execute this was successful. The part near the end featuring his wordless vocal improvisation backed by his passionate riffing nearly sends me into tears. The closing features a crying solo, followed by some explosive feedback/distortion noises. And "Burning of The Midnight Lamp" (probably my favorite Hendrix song of all-time) is a murky, mysterious and utterly frightening number with Hendrix's vocal smothered in the oceanic mix. There's even a sped-up guitar effect meant to sound like a harpischord running throughout the song. There still may be a harpischord present (anyone who knows, feel free to correct me), but the aforementioned sped-up guitar effect has been documented.
I tried to make this review as quick and succinct as possible, but it's obvious that I've failed. It's difficult for me to be brief on an album as detailed, complex, vast, mysterious and powerful as this. Jimi Hendrix's influence on popular music is incalculable, and his music is just as relevant - if not more relevant - today as it was over three decades ago. These things are only a few of the many that qualify Jimi Hendrix as the monumental legend he is. Please enjoy the album.
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Electric Ladyland
Electric Ladyland by The Jimi Hendrix Experience (Audio CD - 1997)
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