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Electronic Sound Import


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Audio CD, Import, December 10, 1996
$16.99 $8.99

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 10, 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Zapple
  • ASIN: B0000070RC
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #289,232 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Under The Mersey Wall
2. No Time Or Space

Editorial Reviews

Reissue of George's second non-Beatles album. Self-produced,it contains two lengthy experimental electronic tracks & wasfirst released on the Apple label in 1969. Also includes theoriginal cover art. 1996 EMI release.

Customer Reviews

That is exactly what this two track recording is; sounds and really not music.
Bo Knows
Apparently George didn't realize there's a clever way of using electronic sounds- that being, to use them *occasionally* and *creatively*.
B. E Jackson
It's fun to kinda go back in time and hear what was then really experimental recordings.
Paul Wiele

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Louie Bourland on May 30, 2003
Format: Audio CD
When it comes to the so-called 'synthesizer wizards', one would not usually think of Beatle George as being one of them. For a brief time in 1969 however, he was just that. Following a recording session for Apple artist Jackie Lomax, George expressed a high interest in what was then a relavtively new instrument. Immediately following this, he purchased a Moog synthesizer and assembled "Electronic Sound". Shortly afterwards, The Beatles were using the Moog for the sessions which became the "Abbey Road" album.
Originally released in May 1969 on the Zapple label, "Electronic Sound" was dismissed as uncommercial rubbish. Over 30 years after its original release, it's amazing to see just how far ahead of its time this album really is.
"Under The Mersey Wall" is the first of the two tracks which comprise this album. It begins with a series of racecar-like noises and various other sounds. At about the half-way mark, the piece shifts into a surreal meditative mood which floats like a strange unknown planet.
"No Time Or Space" is a 25-minute masterwork which goes all over the place. There has been a long-running controversy surrounding this piece. Synth-pioneer Bernie Krause has claimed in numerous publications that it was he, not George, who created this track. Indeed, Krause is credited as an assistant on this track but it is still a mystery as to who is actually creating the noises on this track. Either way, there is no denying that this piece is extraordinary. It begins with what sounds like a plethora of shotgun blasts. This then transforms into a series squaks, squeals and bursts of white noise. After several minutes of this, a giant galeforce wind of white noise comes in which leads into roughly 15-minutes worth of what sounds like aliens taking over a galaxy in a sci-fi cartoon.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By The Man On The Flaming Pie on December 18, 2002
Format: Audio CD
OK, we all know what this album is, right? For the benefit of those who don't already know, this album was originally released in 1969 and was George Harrison's experiment with nothing more than a moog synthesizer. It's not what you'd call "music"...as the title suggests, it is "sound." That does not mean that it's in the same category as John Lennon's "Revolution 9" or his other experiments, however. This is 40-some minutes of sound created with a moog synthesizer--there are no vocals or voices in it whatsoever. You will also not hear any of George's guitar talent or even any actual rhythms.
This is a good album to listen to if you need some far-out background sound for whatever reason. You will not be able to memorize this like you would with regular songs, so the album sounds almost new every time you listen to it. If you like more modern industrial music, you might really enjoy this album, if not solely for its historical signifigance.
Listening tip: Wear headphones or have your speakers on either side of you to get that nice "surround" effect. Many of the sounds jump from side to side and it's much more exciting to listen to this way (as is pretty much anything recorded back when stereo was still a new thing).
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Other people have given this LP negative reviews, but they obviously 1. Haven't listened to it close enough, or 2. Have no idea what experimental/avant garde music is all about. For anyone who ever bought Coil or Nurse With Wound albums, you will love this. I only give it a four star rating, because the 'art of noise' has come a long way since 1969. If you're just getting into this kind of music, I recommed starting with Nurse With Wound's "Thunder Perfect Mind," or ELpH vs. Coil's "Worship The Glitch," then move on to this. Sure, it's not like the rest of your George Harrison collection, but it is a wonderful LP and a lot of fun to listen to.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 1998
Format: Audio CD
What would be the one album I would take to a deserted island? "Electronic Sound" by George Harrison. Made up of only two cuts...over 40 minutes long...and PURE NOISE. Then why do I love this recording? I love Progressive Rock, and George Harrison took it to the extreme.
Should you buy it? Yes! It is Non-Music at it's finest. Can I tell you what it sounds like? No! And you will hear why.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By burritobrother VINE VOICE on August 12, 2001
Format: Audio CD
...Although his first instrumental solo album, '68's brilliant "Wonderwall" (mostly Indian music) could be called avant-garde by some, it is his second solo effort "Electronic Sound" (1969) which is truly of that genre. Given a Moog synthesizer, Harrison proceeded to record whatever sounds he managed to emit from it. It's not exactly music, but then again it is. Don't expect to hear any singing or lyrics or actual melodies, and you should enjoy this disc for it's sheer boldness. I like some avant-garde and of course I love Harrison, so this has always been a disc I appreciate immensely. It is CERTAINLY better than those three avant-whatever albums John and Yoko dumped on the public at around the same time. So while Beatles fans need those cd's as well to complete their collections, "Electronic Sound" is more than that. It is a surprising gem; George never released a bad record, and this is no exception.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark Champion on May 2, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The Quiet One out-Reeded Reed on this one, 6 years prior to the monumental Metal Machine Music. Harrison had already released WONDERWALL MUSIC in 1968, befuddling many a Beatle-Bopper with its Indian rhythms and off-the-Wall eclecticism- -and then this thing, this monstronsity, comes out of the Void like some squealing wind-up banshee on the short-lived and aptly-named Zapple lable as a follow-up a year later. A friend of mine bought it ("Look at this freaky COVER!!") and upon first (and last) listen said with genuine curiosity, "When does he start DOING anything?" about three minutes into "Under The Mersey Wall". Blip, BLOOP, dooot, twhiiit- - - it just wouldn't end. He gave it about five minutes, looked at the cover with perplexity, removed the needle from the record and turned it over ("It only has two songs?"), hopefully placing the needle at the beginning of "No Time Or Space" and I had to laugh when it started with the identical BLOOP he'd interrupted when lifting the needle. Not bad.
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