Elementary Modern Standard Arabic: 1 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$68.73
Qty:1
  • List Price: $75.00
  • Save: $6.27 (8%)
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Elementary Modern Standar... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Elementary Modern Standard Arabic: Volume 1, Pronunciation and Writing; Lessons 1-30 (Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Lessons 1-30) Paperback – Unabridged, April 29, 1983

ISBN-13: 978-0521272957 ISBN-10: 0521272955 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $68.73
25 New from $47.98 43 Used from $12.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Paperback, Unabridged
"Please retry"
$68.73
$47.98 $12.00
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Elementary Modern Standard Arabic: Volume 1, Pronunciation and Writing; Lessons 1-30 (Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Lessons 1-30) + Elementary Modern Standard Arabic: Volume 2, Lessons 31-45; Appendices (Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Lessons 31-45) + Al-Kitaab fii Ta<SUP>c</SUP>allum al-<SUP>c</SUP>Arabiyya with DVD, Second Edition: Al-Kitaab fii Ta'allum al-'Arabiyya with DVDs: A Textbook for ... Part One Second Edition (Arabic Edition)
Price for all three: $183.48

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Teacher Supplies
Browse our Teacher Supplies store, with everything teachers need to educate students and expand their learning.

Product Details

  • Series: Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Lessons 1-30 (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 658 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (April 29, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521272955
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521272957
  • Product Dimensions: 1.4 x 8.3 x 10.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #516,671 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

The foremost introduction for the English-speaking student to the active written language of the contemporary Arab world is designed for the beginning student as well. It is written by a team of Arabic language teachers consisting of native and non-native speakers.

Customer Reviews

This book is awful.
N. Apolinar
This book would be best suited for someone who wants to evetually pursue academic studies in Arabic or delve into arabic literature.
Armando-Malwani
And one more note: if you are trying to learn Arabic without the help of a native speaker, then do not buy this book.
Shaun M. Overton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Khalid Ikram on June 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
Comparing this book with others of its genre, I must say that it has stood the test of time rather well. The lessons are written clearly, and are not difficult to follow on one's own. They are comprehensive, and cover as much grammar as is needed to go to quite a high level. The book can also serve as a reference volume. The accompanying tapes (which you should absolutely buy) give hours of examples of pronounciation and drill.
The downside is that the book is long. (However, remember the old saying that, "Short writing makes for long reading.") Its vocabulary is not particularly helpful for general conversation. And it is not produced in a "slick" manner; specifically, its appearance is of typed rather than printed pages, and it is devoid of the graphics that many present day students like.
My conclusion is that if you want a solid coverage of the grammar of Modern Standard Arabic written in an easy paced manner, and have the patience to "eat the elephant a bite at a time," this book will serve you well. If you are looking for something that will help you with conversational Arabic, or one that will keep you entertained while you are learning, then this is not the right book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Ibn Fattouma on December 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have been studying Arabic for 5 years now. When I first started, I used this book. Subsequently, I used the Georgetown Al-Kitab and the OSU study materials. Based on my experience with all these beginning books, I have been able to form an opinion of "Elementary Modern Standard Arabic".
The advantages of the book are its easy structure, grammar emphasis and easy-to-understand explanations. The book covers 30 chapters/lessons. Each one of them is structured very rigidly: grammar points, new grammar sets and reading comprehension with new words from the same lesson. I find this structure of each lesson very conducive to learning and reinforcing what the student learns.
The disadvantage of the book is its lack of rich vocabulary, its special focus in choice of texts for the lessons. In addition, the lack of graphics, pictures, etc makes it somewhat unengaging compared to other language books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Thomas F. Ogara on June 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Abboud's book is as good a place to start as any in learing literary Arabic. I did not use it as a starter - I used Heywood and Nahmad - but Abboud's book goes into a lot more detail, and provides a great deal more drill material.
Which is the only negative I can say about it - DON'T try to teach yourself from it. You'll get lost. Intermediate to advanced students can bravely strike out on their own with the other books in this series, which I believe was originally put out by the University of Michigan. But this book is best off undertaken as a college text for a course.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Michael Akard on March 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
Arabic has the reputation of being one of the most difficult languages in the world, and this book is one of the reasons. It is accurate, authoritative, and widely-used, but is is also very large, highly-technical, and devoid of visual stimulation. Students can (and do) spend months pouring over this material, only to be dismayed at how little of the book they have completed. In addition, the recorded material, on which many of the exercises are based, is difficult to obtain and prohibitively-priced. The book is useful as a last resort, but fortunately there are now many other better texts available.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is for serious students of Arabic, not for the casual tourist who needs to learn how to ask for the restroom in Beirut or where the local nightspots are in Cairo. The emphasis is on *Standard* Arabic, which is closer to the formal language found in the Qur'an, not on spoken, informal use. By the time you finish this book, not only will you be well on your way to diagramming Arabic sentences in your sleep (I'm dreaming in Arabic now and correcting my homework when I wake up), but you'll learn more about English grammar than you ever knew existed. The book does have a few minor flaws in its layout, such as introducing an occasional grammatical concept several chapters ahead of its explanation, but the rewards far outweigh the little inconvenience when you realize you know *why* a sentence is constructed a certain way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By MOHAMED A ALSIADI on May 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
This textbook is designed to cover the first year of instruction in Modern Standard Arabic. It will teach students to read, speak, and write Arabic. The text also provides information about the geography of the Arab world, prominent characters in history, festivities in Arab culture, the media, daily life, and the family. Exercises in comprehension, vocabulary, grammar, and writing attend to both form and meaning and develop functional abilities and knowledge about the Arabic sound, writing, and language systems. The book needs an updating and it will be an excellent book. MOHAMED A ALSIADI,The State University of New jersey,RUTGERS .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Shaun M. Overton on May 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
I've used this book during two years of Arabic at the University of Texas. My professor cannot stand this book, and beginning in Fall 2002, the beginning Arabic textbook will be replaced by another (al-Kitab, I believe). My TA despises the book, and very, very few of the students could glean any information from it.

My professor's major problem with the book are the Basic Texts and Comprhension passages which appear in every chapter. They are terribly out of date, and frankly, pointless. They are written in a "dumbed down" way, which makes sense in the initial chapters, but as you continue throughout the book, it gets very annoying.

My TA made the point to me that the book's emphasis on grammar is not the ideal way to teach a language. It makes sense if you wish to understand Arabic as a linguist, but for those trying to learn the language for reading and speaking purposes, the information is seriously over-detailed. Entirely too much emphasis is placed on specific grammatical exceptions that I rarely employ in my reading or speaking of Arabic. I feel this time could have been better utilized learning more common elements of Modern Standard Arabic.

As a student, I have a strong command of English grammar. This served me well in the lengthy explanations of grammatical elements, and after some struggle I could understand the concepts through the linguistic jargon. Most students, however, are not grammar experts. If you start trying to learn Arabic without a prior knowledge of simple grammatical concepts like what the imperfect case is in English, you will be dead in the water. This is a simple point, I know, but one which frustrated 95% of the students.

My biggest complaint is with the vocab.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?