Engineering & Transportation
Buy Used
$30.37
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by TrnThePage
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean. Great Binding. Cover Shows Light Wear.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Elements of Information Theory (Wiley Series in Telecommunications and Signal Processing) Hardcover – August 26, 1991

ISBN-13: 978-0471062592 ISBN-10: 0471062596 Edition: 99th

Used
Price: $30.37
7 New from $91.86 26 Used from $26.37
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, August 26, 1991
"Please retry"
$91.86 $26.37

Frequently Bought Together

Elements of Information Theory (Wiley Series in Telecommunications and Signal Processing) + An Introduction to Information Theory: Symbols, Signals and Noise (Dover Books on Mathematics)
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Wiley Series in Telecommunications and Signal Processing (Book 20)
  • Hardcover: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Interscience; 99 edition (August 26, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471062596
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471062592
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #834,534 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Following a brief introduction and overview, early chapters cover the basic algebraic relationships of entropy, relative entropy and mutual information, AEP, entropy rates of stochastics processes and data compression, duality of data compression and the growth rate of wealth. Later chapters explore Kolmogorov complexity, channel capacity, differential entropy, the capacity of the fundamental Gaussian channel, the relationship between information theory and statistics, rate distortion and network information theories. The final two chapters examine the stock market and inequalities in information theory. In many cases the authors actually describe the properties of the solutions before the presented problems.

From the Inside Flap

Elements of Information Theory is an up-to-date introduction to the field of information theory and its applications to communication theory, statistics, computer science, probability theory, and the theory of investment. Covering all the essential topics in information theory, this comprehensive work provides an accessible introduction to the field that blends theory and applications. In step-by-step detail, the authors introduce the basic quantities of entropy, relative entropy, and mutual information and show how they arise as natural answers to questions of data compression, channel capacity, rate distortion, hypothesis testing, information flow in networks, and gambling. In addition, Elements of Information Theory investigates a number of ideas never before covered at this level in a textbook, including:
* The relationship of the second law of thermodynamics to Markov chains
* Competitive optimality of Huffman codes
* The duality of data compression and gambling
* Lempel Ziv coding
* Kolmogorov complexity
* Portfolio theory
* Inequalities in information theory and their consequences in mathematics
Complete with numerous illustrations, original problems and historical notes, Elements of Information Theory is a practical reference for communications professionals and statisticians specializing in information theory. It also serves as an excellent introductory text for senior and graduate students taking courses in telecommunications, electrical engineering, statistics, computer science, and economics.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 90 people found the following review helpful By Julius Kusuma on October 25, 2000
Thomas Cover is a well-known researcher for both his excellent and sometimes surprising work in information theory, and his reputation as a teacher. The result here is a very well-written and gentle "overview" of information theory that is designed as a comprehensive introduction to the subject.
One thing to note about this book is that it is by design both an introduction and a survey of information theory, as the title suggests. It starts off with the basic concepts of information theory such as entropy and mutual information, and continues on with brief and gentle reviews of different more intermediate topics such as entropy rates in random processes, introduction to coding, and finally with the channel coding theorem, rate-distortion theorem, network information theory, and other more advanced topics.
While I find that his treatment of the intermediate and advanced topics to be excellent, there are a few weak aspects on this book's treatment of the introductory topics here and there. However, with just a little persistence the reader will be well rewarded by Cover's excellent writing. At each topic, the reader is presented with reason, motivation, intuition and example before delving into the rigorous treatment of the subject. Therefore even the most casual reader will be rewarded with good insights into the different topics in information theory.
That all said, I highly recommend this book to anybody armed with elementary probability who is interested in the general area of communication, signal processing and information theory. Readers who are alergic to math are recommended to start with J.R. Pierce's "Introduction to Information Theory" and readers looking for a casual introduction to the fundamental concepts in information theory are recommended to find a copy of A. Renyi's hard to find "A Diary on Information Theory".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Roger Peng on July 22, 1999
Cover and Thomas have written an excellent book on information theory. This book is suitable for an introductory type course but the entire book probably cannot be covered at once. All of the explanations and proofs are very understandable, although the section on types can be a tad confusing at times! I would not recommend this book to someone with a casual interest in information theory, rather to someone who wants a more rigorous treatment of the underlying mathematics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Todd Ebert on September 14, 2000
Thomas Cover is a legend in the fields of information theory, telecommunications, and complexity theory, and this book is a reflection of his expertise in these fields. Thus, I recommend anyone to read this book who is even remotely interested in these fields, for Cover will make you *very* interested after reading the book. I found the Chapter on Kolmogorov complexity to be very good, and it was the first time that I could claim I actually had a good intuitive grasp of the subject. I found the Chapters on AEP, Data Compression, and Entropy Rates also very informative. On the downside, I found the chapters on Rate Distortion and Channel Capacity (two very central topics in information theory) somewhat confusing, and have seen better presentations (see Steve Roman's "Coding and Information Theory").
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Naveen on December 13, 1999
This is an excellent book on information theory. It covers the basics from entropy to the more complex aspects of rate-distortion theory in an elegant manner. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in understanding the concept of entropy and also to those who want a deeper understanding of the theory behind source and channel coding. A must buy for those involved in compression and wanting to get the theoritical background behind coding.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 2001
This book is a research-level books that guides you to the world of information theory. Many arguements in the book are closely related to those in the latest information theory papers. For instance, the line of thought of the proof of channel capacity theorem (achievability->error analysis->converse) are still used in many network information theory papers. Hence, not only can readers refer to other papers when learning the subject(esp network information theory), but also get a solid foundation if he wants to continue with information theory. Another point is the intuition employed throughout the book. Dr.Cover visualizes many abstract notions (e.g. typical set)in information theory with clear diagrams. The subject suddenly becomes more approachable, and more importantly, these techniques are very important in subsequent study of the subject. Finally, the broad coverage of the book (of coz, it has depth) provides reader with a sip of the creativity and eclectic nature of information theory. In sum, after reading the book, readers will have some idea of this exciting field! But of coz, this is only the beginning!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 6, 2000
The book on Information Theory by Thomas and Cover is quite comprehensive in its treatment of the subject. The book also offers good examples of applications of Information Theory. Its chapter on Large Deviations , for example, offers a good idea of how to apply information theory to that field. One could use it for, say, switching theory. The treatment is delightfully mathematical, and yet even a beginner can understand it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Verified Purchase
I agree with all who gave five stars at the time of this writing. I like to mention that for those who seriously study this book (especially focusing on discrete processes), Ergodic theory of discrete sample paths by Shields is also of great value.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again