Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Elgar: Symphony No. 1 / Symphony No. 2 / Sanguine Fan / Froissart Overture
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Elgar: Symphony No. 1 / Symphony No. 2 / Sanguine Fan / Froissart Overture

2 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Amazon Music Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, April 26, 2005
"Please retry"
$49.99 $49.99

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
  • Sample this album Title (Sample)
1
30
21:59
Album Only
2
30
7:25
3
30
13:07
Album Only
4
30
14:35
Album Only
5
30
4:41
6
30
3:31
7
30
2:06
8
30
0:38
9
30
1:29
10
30
3:03
11
30
1:09
12
30
0:57
13
30
1:51
Disc 2
1
30
14:32
Album Only
2
30
20:14
Album Only
3
30
15:24
Album Only
4
30
9:11
Album Only
5
30
16:34
Album Only

Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 26, 2005)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Alliance
  • ASIN: B0007SK9ME
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #451,284 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jurgen Lawrenz on May 18, 2013
Format: Audio CD
There are two mutually incompatible approaches to Elgar, which might be characterised as "urgent and dramatic" and "leisurely and majestic". I have not heard Elgar's own readings, from which the "urgent" maestros - e.g. Boult, Solti, Davis - draw their legitimation. But I know that he liked Barbirolli's ways, who is certainly "majestic". So is Thomson in the album under review.
Elgar's symphonies can stand both kinds of treatment and reveal different, though equally valuable facets, in both approaches. In fact, I prefer Boult to Barbirolli; and Thomson to Solti. So the disparity runs right through my own appreciation of the music!
But on the whole, my perception about Elgar's music is that it has a "soft" inner core. It is not innately heroic, nor overtly masculine, but romantic in a way that harks back to Schumann, Saint-Saens, Bruch, Massenet - a mix between bourgeois sentiment and cosmopolitan brilliance of expression that finds its apogee in Elgar. Accordingly I find that Elgar's melodies (which self-deprecatingly he calls "tunes" and rebutted one critique with the observation that vulgarity is a state of mind, not an objective fact) require a certain amplitude to make their impact to the full. Solti for one seems to me too rushed in this respect. The dramatic aspect, predominantly in his tumultuous climaxes, can make its point both ways. But I think the heart of Elgar is melody; a conductor who pays insufficient attention to them is, to my mind, missing the essence of it.
Coming to the performance in hand, I find that the most convincing presentation of No. 1 (and utterly magnificent, from the orchestral point of view) is by Davis in his Dresden recording - all the more remarkable for being a live performance. It supplanted my previous favourite Boult, by a small margin.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Firebrand on April 27, 2014
Format: Audio CD
The Bryden Thomson Elgar cycle with the London Philharmonic features big, weighty interpretations, epic scale, and slower tempos, emphasizing the elegaic and monumental. Slower, and a shade darker.

The Elgar First, with its cross currents and mystery, is a difficult work to pull off, with most recordings ending up with ambivalent results. Bryden Thomson's 1985 version with the London Philharmonic is the exception. Here is a huge, sweeping, weighty interpretation that navigate the currents effectively, delivering a moving experience.

It is instructive to compare Thomson's with the dramatically different Elgar Firsts recorded by Sir Adrian Boult and Vernon Handley, also with the London Philharmonic (Handley's just a few years before Thomson's). Where Boult's is feisty and upstanding, Handley straightforward and lighter textured, Thomson's is by far the most monumental and romantic. Slower, and a shade darker. It is also the most tragic, in an almost Mahlerian sense.

It is a performance that builds. An expansive, stormy first movement leads to a second movement with the most storm-trooping march of any other version, set against a trio with fragrance and pluck. Thomson masterfully transitions into the adagio, the emotional heart of the work. It is lush, melancholy, and heartfelt. Again, this one sings unlike any other version. Finally,in the fourth movement, Thomson captures Elgar's "shuddering dread", and caps the performance with a conclusion of Brahmsian turbulence and great radiance. In addition to a big interpretation, the sound is also big, with a nice concert hall acoustic.

Critic David Hurwitz hated this recording, which he felt was "interminable". This is another fine example of how it pays to go the opposite of a boneheaded Hurwitz opinion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category