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Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote Hardcover – April 29, 2008


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Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote + I Could Do That!: Esther Morris Gets Women the Vote (Melanie Kroupa Books) + With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 700L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (April 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805079033
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805079036
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.4 x 11.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #649,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1–4—Stone looks at the life of Stanton from childhood to her emergence as a pioneering leader of women's rights. The "strong-spirited, rule-breaking" girl asserted her independence by embracing physical and academic challenges and by questioning traditional viewpoints. This comes through in energetic, lucid prose that focuses on Elizabeth's ideas and feelings rather than on specific events. By consistently sticking to the subject's own experiences, without detours into historical details or even any dates, the author introduces a historical figure whom readers can relate to as a person. Excellent gouache and colored pencil illustrations, rendered in a lighthearted folk-art style, provide rich background for the brief text. They establish the time period through visual details and capture Stanton's spirit and the attitudes of those she encounters without overstatement. The book culminates with the event that propelled the woman into the national spotlight: her presentation at a convention in Seneca Falls, NY, in 1848, of the Declaration of Right and Sentiments, which included a call for women's voting rights. "Elizabeth had tossed a stone in the water and the ripples grew wider and wider and wider." An author's note briefly covers Stanton's subsequent accomplishments. Through words and pictures that work together and an emphasis on ideas and personality rather than factoids, this well-conceived introduction is just right for a young audience.—Steven Engelfried, Multnomah County Library, OR
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Most young people will be unfamiliar with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and what she accomplished. Stone goes a long way toward correcting that, wisely beginning with a pithy introduction that links the life of women in the early nineteenth century with that of readers today: “What would you do if someone told you you can’t be what you want to be because you are a girl? . . . your voice doesn’t matter? Would you fight for your rights? Elizabeth did.” What follows is a short, incisive biography covering some of the high points of Stanton’s life, beginning with her shocking realization about how unfairly the law treated women, which translated into Stanton’s lifelong work for women’s suffrage. In shorts text bites, Stone explains how Stanton met her abolitionist husband (and refused to give up her name), the origins of the women’s rights movement, and the effect of the Women’s Rights Conference in Seneca Falls, New York. This focus works well for the audience, though the brevity leaves some holes. Susan B. Anthony, for instance, is pictured, though unnamed. The child-pleasing artwork features characters a bit reminiscent of clothespin dolls, but the cameos of action, matched by full-page pictures, make the history accessible. A must for library shelves. Grades 1-3. --Ilene Cooper

More About the Author

Tanya Lee Stone is an award-winning author of books for kids and teens. Stone went to performing arts high school in New Haven, CT and went on to major in English at Oberlin College (and study Voice at Oberlin Conservatory). After graduation she moved to New York and became an editor. Stone was an editor for more than a dozen years and has a Masters Degree in Science Education. She teaches Writing for Children at Champlain College.

After moving to Vermont, Stone became a full-time writer and has published more than 90 books for young readers. She writes picture books, nonfiction, and Young Adult fiction. Her newest nonfiction books have garnered some major awards. Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream (Candlewick 09), received a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, Jane Addams Honor, YALSA Nonfiction Finalist, Orbis Pictus Honor, and was awarded ALA's Sibert Medal for the best nonfiction book for young readers of 2010. The Good the Bad, and the Barbie won SCBWI's Golden Kite Award for the best nonfiction book of the year for 2011.

Her Young Adult novel, A Bad Boy Can Be Good for a Girl (Wendy Lamb/Random House) was an IRA Young Adult Choice, an ALA Quick Picks, an NYPL Book for the Teen Age, and SLJ Book of the Month. Her newest nonfiction picture books, Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote and Sandy's Circus: A Story About Alexander Calder received starred reviews and were put on several state award lists. Elizabeth Leads the Way is also an ALA Notable, an Amelia Bloomer Award title, and a CBC Notable Social Studies Book.

Forthcoming titles include picture books about Elizabeth Blackwell and Jane Addams, as well as a YA nonfiction book about the first black paratroopers in WWII called Courage Has No Color.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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It's a great introduction to the challenges women faced in times gone by.
H.Q. Nguyen
She realized that one of the most effective ways to change women's status as secondary citizens and to change the existing laws was to give women the right to vote.
Yana V. Rodgers
It was a wonderful history lesson and easily read to young ears, we loved it!
MomofFour

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Yana V. Rodgers on August 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Already at a young age, Elizabeth understood that American society considered girls inferior to boys. As she grew older, she became increasingly angry that women did not have the right to claim ownership of property or the money they earned, they could not attend the same colleges as men, they were not allowed to vote, and they were expected to have babies and stay home to take care of their families. She realized that one of the most effective ways to change women's status as secondary citizens and to change the existing laws was to give women the right to vote.

Together with several like-minded women, she wrote the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments, which called for a broad range of social, economic, legal, and political reforms to boost the status of women in American life. The Declaration was signed at the first American women's rights convention held in Seneca Falls, NY, in 1848. The demand for women's right to vote was the most controversial reform proposed at the convention, and Elizabeth worked the rest of her life to fight for women's right to vote.

This well-researched book does a nice job in explaining to children that the right to vote plays an important role in improving women's economic and social status. By emphasizing this link, the book embraces several concepts in economics related to human resources, work, discrimination, and property rights. Historical narratives about Elizabeth Cady Stanton abound, but Elizabeth Leads the Way is one of the few accounts of Elizabeth's leading role in the women's rights movement that is accessible to younger readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Redick on January 12, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this for my granddaughter for Christmas along with 3 other books on the 4 for 3 deal. I bought them because they were all highly rated and they were on my granddaughter's reading list from school. She's in second grade. I read all the books before I gave them to her. I wanted to be sure that none of them said things that I didn't agree with. This one I think is pretty accurate historically and it doesn't promote any specific point of view. I liked that because I believe that history should be factual. I'm not really sure how much my granddaughter liked the book. I haven't heard anything. If I had to guess, I'd say it's probably not a book that a 7 or 8 year old would get excited about but given that it was on her book list and I think it's pretty accurate historically, I think it's probably a worthwhile read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Well-Read Child on October 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
What is most impressive about this biography is that Stone effectively conveys a clear picture of Cady Stanton's personality and spirit AND gives a great overview of the beginning of the movement using clear and concise language. Rebecca Gibbon's illustrations are rendered in gouache and colored-pencil on paper and compliment the story's vibrant and fast-paced tone.

Readers are not overwhelmed with facts and leave with this message: Cady Stanton was a courageous, determined, and well-respected person whose efforts and persistence inspired others to continue in her footsteps and ultimately win the right to vote for women. It's a very inspiring and engaging story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Linda L. Houghton on December 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In "Elizabeth Leads the Way", kids and adults can learn about Elizabeth Cady Stanton and why she believed that women should have the right to vote. This book inspires the reader to take action on something that they believe in. While it's a picture book, it presents Elizabeth's story in such a way that all ages can catch her vision.
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By MomofFour on November 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I sometimes worry about the audience intended age on these historical picture books but this one hit the mark for my almost 3 year old. I was able to explain only a couple concepts she didn't know (abolitionist and what voting means) in order for her to appreciate the storyline here. She now talks about this book a lot and requests it by name several times a week. It brings to life the story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and how in her day it was a pity to be born a girl. We follow Elizabeth on her journey through simple easy to read text, nothing overdone, to showcase how she lived to show the world a girl CAN do anything she wants to. It was a wonderful history lesson and easily read to young ears, we loved it!
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By Jojo on January 12, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was fun to read with my 8 year old granddaughter. It was a Christmas present. We believe it is important for her to have feminine role models and learn of the achievements of women in years past. This book presented good opportunities to talk with her about Cady, Cady's values and beliefs. This type of book raises the bar for young people's minds rather than reading simply fluff stuff. We also read other children's books of women in history such as Amelia Earhart (from Amazon) and I rate that highly as well.
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By H.Q. Nguyen on January 16, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Bought a copy for all my friends with kids. It's a great introduction to the challenges women faced in times gone by.
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