Elizabeth and Leicester and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$14.03
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $1.97 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Elizabeth and Leicester: The Truth about the Virgin Queen and the Man She Loved Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.03
$3.54 $1.42

Frequently Bought Together

Elizabeth and Leicester: The Truth about the Virgin Queen and the Man She Loved + Breathing Space: A Spiritual Journey in the South Bronx + The Buddha in the Attic (Pen/Faulkner Award - Fiction)
Price for all three: $44.81

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (October 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143114492
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143114499
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #187,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Quite simply one of the most enthralling history books I’ve ever read.”—Alison Weir, author of The Life of Elizabeth I

“Gristwood . . . parses out what we do know about this pair and what information fuels many of the more titillating conclusions people have drawn over the years.”—Chicago Sun-Times

“Vivacious and absorbing . . . Full of intriguing suggestions, stimulating analogies and shrewd connections.”—The Sunday Times (London)

Review

“ Quite simply one of the most enthralling history books I’ve ever read.”
—Alison Weir, author of The Life of Elizabeth I

“ Gristwood . . . parses out what we do know about this pair and what information fuels many of the more titillating conclusions people have drawn over the years.”
Chicago Sun-Times

“ Vivacious and absorbing . . . Full of intriguing suggestions, stimulating analogies and shrewd connections.”
The Sunday Times (London) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
It was well researched and well written.
MsReadalot
This is a well-written analysis of Elizabeth's most important emotional relationship, as well as the most enduring one of her lifetime.
Amazon Customer
I made the mistake of buying multiple versions of the same book, thinking they were different books on a similar topic.
Amanda Ficken

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Ficken on November 11, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is well written and interesting. It compiles information from many different sources including private papers to provide a great insight into the relationship between Elizabeth and her ultimate favorite, Robert Dudley, without reading like a textbook. It provides a wonderful insight into the relationship that shocked contemporaries and impacted relations between England and many other countries. As the author points out, any courtship between the two lasted only a few months, but seems to have defined how most people think about this decades-long relationship. Much is done to redeem Leicester as a politician and a patriot and to counteract his reputation a scheming traitor.

Sarah Gristwood has published this same book under multiple titles, including Elizabeth & Leicester: Power, Passion, Politics(which has many more reviews) and Elizabeth & Leicester. I made the mistake of buying multiple versions of the same book, thinking they were different books on a similar topic.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By MsReadalot on July 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I won't go into detail on the book, as other reviewers have already written about that. I am fascinated with the relationship between the two of them and the book didn't disappoint. It was well researched and well written. My only umbrage is, once again, how us kindle readers get ripped off on the pictures. I know kindle has the capability. I would rather seem them in black in white than not at all- Luckily, I am familiar with 'most' of the poitraits the author described. But for someone who doesn't read a lot of Tudor history, you would be so curious to see what the players looked like. To add insult to injury, there is a whole footnote section dedicated to "Picture acknowledgements". I sure would have liked to see them- I didn't want to give the book itself lower stars because it WAS good and the writer addressed all the the issues that have been swirling around for centuries.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. M Mills on November 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
Elizabeth ( (1533-1603 reigned as British Queen from 1558-1603) was a great and complex monarch. Was she a virgin? The exploration of this topic is the subject of a new biography by neophyte English historian Sarah Gristwood.
Elizabeth was a complex person. She told her subjects that it was her desire to remain a virgin since she was truly wed only to her country. Yet Elizabeth had many "amours" in her life among whom the most long lasting was that with Robert Dudley (1534-1587) the Earl of Leicester. Elizabeth and Leicester had known each other since they were children; both were Protestants. Elizabeth was an intellectual while Leicester was a man of action.
Leicester was her counselor and led her armies in the Netherlands fighting against the Spanish forces led by the cruel Duke of Parma. Dudley's father and stepson (the Earl of Essex) were executed for high treason against the crown. Dudley died of a stomach disorder. He was bright, tall and handsome enjoying hunting and horse back riding with Elizabeth through a long friendship. Whether the two ever slept together is unknown. ( I think probable!). Leicester had a stormy career in affairs of the heart. He was thrice wed and had mistresses. The wives were:
Amy Robsart-she died under mysterious circumstances falling from steps in her home of Cumnor. Was she murdered by being pushed down the steps or poisoned? Did she die of natural causes? Were Elizabeth and Dudly involved in the foul deed? No one is able to say for certain and neither is Gristwood.
Douglass Essex-She committed adultery with Dudley producing a child with him. Her son by the Earl of Essex sought to become Elizabeth's lover but was executed for raising a rebellion against the Virgin Queen.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By V. Engle on April 7, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this book, but did not really learn anything new. It was a well done compilation of many and diverse sources which is certainly convenient. Unlike many books written by apologists for subjects, this one does not give slanted conjectures and interpretations without making it clear that they ARE conjectures. These two figures were "bigger than life" people both in their lives and their impact on history. It is worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This is a well-written analysis of Elizabeth's most important emotional relationship, as well as the most enduring one of her lifetime. Gristwood may sometimes give the Dudleys the benefit of the doubt, but she does not appear particularly biased, especially in light of the beating that Leicester's reputation has taken over time. I liked her thesis that Leicester grew apart from Elizabeth over time, and may have been largely content to do so. I wish Gristwood spent more time on the relationships between Elizabeth's councilors, as I felt those sections gave me greater insight into the Elizabethan court.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0x9bf617e0)