Elizabeth: The Golden Age PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(373) IMDb 6.9/10
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Cate Blanchett and Geoffrey Rush star in this thrilling tale of a queen's crusade to control her love, destroy her enemies and secure her position as a beloved icon of the western world.

Starring:
Jordi Mollà, Aimee King
Runtime:
1 hour, 56 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama
Director Shekhar Kapur
Starring Jordi Mollà, Aimee King
Supporting actors Cate Blanchett, Laurence Fox, John Shrapnel, Geoffrey Rush, Susan Lynch, Elise McCave, Samantha Morton, Abbie Cornish, Penelope McGhie, Rhys Ifans, Eddie Redmayne, Stuart McLoughlin, Clive Owen, Adrian Scarborough, Robert Styles, William Houston, Coral Beed, Rosalind Halstead
Studio NBC Universal
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Beautifully filmed with great acting and costumes.
C. A. Luster
Also as you watch it, it portrays the strength and wisdom of the Queen of England's history!
Carolyn P.
I really liked the first movie and really hated this one.
WSmith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

110 of 122 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pandolfi on October 12, 2007
When we last left Elizabeth I (Cate Blanchett), she was young and inexperienced, struggling to come to terms with ruling a country. We now rejoin her in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age," which begins well into her reign; beginning in the year 1585, the film chronicles the growing tension between England and Spain and culminates with a fierce sea battle. It also examines the relationship between Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen), an adventurous seafarer. What we're presented with is less of an actual account and more of a dramatic love story, which basically means that it isn't even close to being historically accurate. But I guess that isn't a bad thing, considering the film's more creative aspects--"The Golden Age" is a triumph of set and costume design, and the performances are top notch.

If only the story were at the same level. It would be too much to say that the plot isn't interesting; rather, it isn't interesting enough. Much of the material plays like a run of the mill romance, regardless of the time period. I just know that so much more defined Queen Elizabeth I, and I wish the filmmakers had given her character a little more depth. Not that she's completely shallow--if anything, quite a lot weighs heavy on her mind, not the least of which is her conniving cousin, Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots (Samantha Morton). Most of their rivalry stems from different religious faiths: Elizabeth is Protestant while Mary is Catholic. Hoping to take control of the throne, Mary conspires to have Elizabeth assassinated. Intercepting on Elizabeth's behalf is Sir Francis Walsingham (Geoffrey Rush), the Queen's most trusted advisor.

On Mary's side is Philip II (Jordi Mollà), King of Spain, who believes that Elizabeth has turned England into a godless country.
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50 of 54 people found the following review helpful By BookMan VINE VOICE on February 11, 2008
Format: DVD
It's not often that I review movies (there are some exceptions) but felt compelled to do so here as there seem to be so many that disliked Elizabeth - The Golden Age. I saw this when it first came out in the theaters and was thoroughly impressed. Yes, the costumes were spectacular, the photography superlative, and the scenery breathtaking; in other words, this film is filled with eye candy. Cate Blanchett played the awesomely beautiful queen and I was transfixed by her performance - something that normally doesn't happen to me when I go to a movie.

Granted, there may be many historical inaccuracies in this film but I didn't buy a ticket to receive an education - I use other sources (such a books) to accomplish that. (What a concept!) Elizabeth - The Golden Age, effectively transported me out of the here and now into another realm which only the arts can do. It also led to a desire to read more on the life of the "Virgin Queen." It is for those reasons that I would highly recommend this film.
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83 of 106 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 8, 2008
Format: DVD
ELIZABETH: THE GOLDEN AGE isn't golden. Expectations were high after Cate Blanchett's first foray in 1998 as Elizabeth I, but somehow this follow-up film, with the same director (Shekhar Kapur) and writer (Michael Hirst with assistance from William Nicholson), does not reach those heights. Visually stunning, with an endless array of knockout costumes for Blanchett, special effects and scenery as majestic as any that have been photographed by fine cinematographer Remie Adefarasin and a musical score by Craig Armstrong and AR Rahman - all of these fine attributes cannot cover the weak script and the general lack of character development that hampers the usually exceptional core of actors.

The portion of Elizabeth's history covered by the film is the battle with Spain, England being the only country not participating in the Holy War in Europe under the direction of King Philip II of Spain (Jordi Mollà), complete with the surprise decimation of the approaching Spanish Armada due to the heroism and commitment of Elizabeth with her people. The surrounding events include Elizabeth's dalliance with Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen) and the traumatic (for Elizabeth) beheading of Mary Stuart (Samantha Morton), under the advisement of Elizabeth's trusted Sir Francis Walsingham (Geoffrey Rush).

Blanchett is a consummate actress and manages to inhabit the persona of Elizabeth as much with her glances and body language and silences as with the meager material from the script. She IS a Queen reborn. The remainder of the cast is adequate though shallow, and while each has very little to say they maintain an atmosphere of Elizabethan England. This is a DVD that could well be watched without the soundtrack and still be entertaining for the visual splendors. It could have been so much more. Grady Harp, February 08
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By KerrLines on October 13, 2007
Cate Blanchett has outdone even her own self.She has mastered a role that many actresses have also played,but SHE has become Her Royal Majesty Elizabeth even more so in Shekhar Kapur's newest installment ELIZABETH: THE GOLDEN AGE than she was in the first ELIZABETH in 1998.Blanchett is the perfect combination of ice and fire,vulnerability and bullheadedness,sensitivity and rageaholic and masculine and feminine to bring England's savior to the screen.Ms.Blanchett is so in control of herself that the corset stays tied, but the fear and passion always dwell just below the surface.She is Queen.At one point,Blanchett,in a rage at the Spanish Ambassador screams "I have a hurricane within me"....and she does,because Blanchett does.
Blanchett may well see her first BEST ACRESS Oscar this year.She has a Golden Globe and another win would be no surprise.This film has many magnificent qualities going for it,but ultimately it is Cate Blanchett's astute and finely tuned skills as an actress par excellent that carry this film to victory.
The year is 1585.Spain is eying the English throne.Sequestered up in Fartheringay Castle in Scotland,Mary Stuart the Queen of Scotland (an amazing and convincing Samantha Morton performance as always) also has her own designs to usurp Elizabeth,"that bastard whore." Elizabeth is still advised by her chief counselor Francis Walsingham (again Geoffrey Rush reprising his brilliant role from the original).Walsingham still has safeguarded England as a Protestant country.Philip of Spain and Mary Stuart, though, are Catholic, and are set to unseat Elizabeth as Queen.But another usurper enters early on;a usurper of the heart,Sir Walter Raleigh (a well made up and swashbuckled Clive Owen).
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