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Embedded Linux: Hardware, Software, and Interfacing Paperback – March 17, 2002

ISBN-13: 075-2063322260 ISBN-10: 0672322269 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (March 17, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672322269
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672322266
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.9 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #893,954 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Embedded Linux covers the development and implementation of interfacing applications on an embedded Linux platform. It includes a comprehensive discussion of platform selection, crosscompilation, kernel compilation, root filesystem creation, booting, remote debugging, real-world interfacing, application control, data collection, archiving, and presentation.

This book includes serial, parallel, memory I/O, USB, and interrupt-driven hardware designs using x86-, StrongARM®-, and PowerPC®-based target boards. In addition, you will find simple device driver module code that connects external devices to the kernel, and network integration code that connects embedded Linux field devices to a centralized control center. Examples teach hardware developers how to store and activate field bits and deliver process information using open source software. If you are a hardware developer, software developer, system integrator, or product manager who's begun exploring embedded Linux for interfacing applications, this book is for you.

  • Select an embedded Linux platform (x86, StrongARM®, and PowerPC® architectures are covered)
  • Create a cross-compiling and debugging development environment
  • Build a custom Linux kernel for each architecture
  • Create a minimum root filesystem
  • Boot the custom Linux kernel on three target boards with x86, SA-1110, and MPC860 microprocessors
  • Remote debug programs running on a target board across an ethernet network using GNU tools
  • Connect data acquisition and control electronics/peripherals using the microprocessor's serial, parallel, memory I/O, and USB interfaces
  • Measure average interrupt latencies for the x86, SA-1110, and MPC860 microprocessors and design an interrupt-driven process timer with 1mS accuracy
  • Interface the peripherals to the kernel and applications using device driver modules
  • Collect, control, store, and present data via open source protocols and applications
  • Analyze embedded Linux vendor product offerings


0672322269B03282002

About the Author

Craig Hollabaugh, Ph.D., first administered Sun® and Digital® workstations while pursuing a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. His first embedded design, US Patent #5,222,027, remotely monitors a petroleum process. In 1995, at Wireless Scientific®, he began using Linux for industrial control.

Craig currently consults for three companies from his home in Ouray, Colorado. He developed the Proteus Scalable Node code for Antec. At Clifton, Weiss and Associates, he's a member of a carrier-class telecommunications network design team. He's also designing FM, MP3, and Bluetooth headset electronics for Arriva®.



0672322269AB03282002

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Yetanotherguy on April 19, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As of 4/2004, the book relies on a free distribution of Hard Hat linux that is no longer available on Montavista's site (as they charge $25K for a single seat, I guess they felt they were giving too much away ;-) HOWEVER: Hollanaugh has copies of them with all of his scripts on his site, so look for them there. His scripts are also now modified to point to the new locations. Though even this distribution is somewhat out of date, this book does a pretty reasonable job of getting you through it all. I found finding free (useful, current) distributions of embedded linux very hard to find but eventually did.. Check out [...] and store.yahoo.com/snapgear/snemlidi.html for current multiplatform distributions. The denx distribution ELDK appears to have morphed from the original Hard Hat distibution as many of the utilities still exist, I used this and was able to "generally" follow along. It's a more recent distribution and supports more platforms (at least for the PPC). I would definately repurchase this book again..
His site is:
[...]
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By "ravishankar_r" on May 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Part I ('Getting Started') is a head start for newbie, but the emphasis is more on setting up a development and
debugging environment for an embedded linux project and not on the process of porting linux for an embedded system.
None of the issues related to the porting of kernel loader or porting of the actual kernel for any of the reference target
boards are addressed.Not enough information for a newbie trying to port linux for a custom board.
After getting past these issues (with help from resources on web) and having a working kernel on the board, Part II ('Interfacing')
of the book is quite useful.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Carles Perello on April 3, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The overall impression is good. Focusing an embedded project following a potential practical case is a good idea.
Its also a good idea to bring three diferent platforms as a case study, making it clear that linux gives enough abstraction level.
I didn't rate it 5 because it relays on hardhat (tm) already built development tools, which is far from being the standrad way to build those tools. Is not that dificult to explain how to make them from source.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
With over 200 of the 400 pages dedicated to interfacing, it seems the emphasis of the title should have reflected this. A more appropriate title would be "Interfacing in an example embedded Linux application". There are many pages of entire listings which could have been made available for download instead.
Although the hardware diagrams are appreciated, they are not specific to Linux. Overall, you may find the examples useful, but you will need to dig deeper to understand the real issues.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Cliff Reid on August 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
Dr. Hollabaugh has certainly shed useful light on the concept of embedded linux. He intelligently sets the stage and walk you through real steps for deploying a fully embedded linux control and monitoring system. The diagram, table, and code examples will leave you with a very clear understanding of the subject matter (providing you have some background with linux development). Personally, I was totally captivated and found myself extremely happy that I have chosen this book to help thrust foward my own intelligence of embedded linux. This book and website....has become a primary reference for future embedded linux application.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By T. Fitzpatrick on October 15, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is clearly the best reference I have for embedded projects under linux; future and present inclusive. The author covers USB device integration quite well, and gives a well worded approach to mounting and setting up your own usb-devfs.

Along with clear examples, the author mainly tries to format the text from an on-lookers prospective to an "embedded ski lift monitor" project- i.e. "My data from working along-side the team" Great effort there-

Another pro to this book is that there are many code samples (all but one I got working, first try) that keep the flow of the book geared towards a beginning hardware-level programmer, with teach by example in mind.

The biggest down side to the text is the beginning material about setting up the workspace environment. A friend tried the same book, and had much trouble simply because they didn't know what pitfalls to expect when installing Debian. Although, the setup does allow for multiple-processor compilations of source code. A Great plus, and another reason for me using the book as a reference.

Out of all the good and bad, this book earned the 4 star rating and with honors. If you want a place to begin embedded systems, and aren't weary of installing a fresh copy of an older model of Debian, have at this book!

Hope this helps-
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
Hey embedded Linux developers,
This book is great. The simple examples clearly illustrate how to get a development system up and running, then how to develop simple device drivers to exercise hardware. I learned from these examples and put them to work on my project immediately. I read the other reviews below and don't know why they didn't like this book, did they even read it?
Its a great book, buy it now (its the best [money]spent on embedded Linux available).
Satisfied Customer
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