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Embedded Linux Paperback – July 15, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0735709980 ISBN-10: 073570998X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sams Publishing; 1 edition (July 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 073570998X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735709980
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,376,402 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

John Lombardo has written an excellent book on working with embedded devices and Linux. He's an exceptional author and a true New Riders VOICE THAT MATTERS. John's eye for detail and accuracy are amazing and it really shows in his work. His thoroughness and understanding of the topic is something you will certainly benefit from. Please share with us what you think of his work. ~Stephanie Wall, Executive Editor, nrfeedback@newriders.com
Featured Contents:
Why Linux?
Advantages of Open Source
Disadvantages of Open Source
Real-Time Operating Systems
Minimal Linux
Static Versus Dynamic Linking
Understanding the Boot Process
Hardware Considerations
Choosing an Embedded Linux Toolkit
Debugging Your Application
Debugging Tools

The rapid rise of Linux as a standard in embedded devices has resulted in a need for better texts. John Lombaro's in-depth understanding of the topic and his straightforward approach make this the perfect book for getting started in embedded systems programming.
~Bob Young, Chairman and Co-founder, Red Hat, Inc.

From the Author

Linux is a great development environment for many types of applications, and many good books have been written on the subject. This book looks at a very specific area of Linux development - embedded devices. Using Linux on your embedded device seems like a wild fantasy a few short years ago; now it's almost routine. This book will help you get started building the software you need to run your embedded device. It will help you avoid the traps and pitfalls, and keep your system lean - reducing your build cost as much as possible.
~John Lombardo

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Customer Reviews

2.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Linux or not, yet another "embedded" book where the discussion barely mentions anything other than the x86, and where the book is certainly focused solely on x86. With embedded systems making up something like 90% of all computers sold in the world and where the x86 accounts for such a small fraction of these embedded systems, I'd wait for *anything* that isn't x86-centric. I mean, how hard is it to envision getting Linux up and running on an x86? We've been doing it since the days of the floppy-based "dd" releases. One passage in the book tells you to "press CTRL + D" ...hey that's great, if you've got a PC BIOS and a keyboard and an entire lifetime of work in front of where your Embedded Linux project starts.
A buy versus build "hardware" section is yet another attempt at trying to settle some of the complex decisions in a generic, watered-down way that is only useful for a marketing professional rather than an engineering professional. Does John know that the price of a PC-104 controller and expansion board is extremely prohibitive in any real "embedded" world where quantity is an issue? When was the last time you found a PC-104 expansion board on your automobile ignition timing control computer or in your elevator controller? Maybe John is simply telling us that Embedded Linux isn't ready for real embedded systems yet, and that as long as we stay on the PC we're good to go? No discussion on creating your own bootloader, no discussion on initializing your system in such a way that it prepares it for running the Linux kernel, just, follow these instructions for x86 and it will work...very few "why" answers in this "Embedded mini-HOWTO" for x86.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Larry R on December 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
What does "embedded" mean? What does "realtime" mean? For someone with no preconceived definition of "embedded", this book could help them feel they have some idea of what it means to do "embedded Linux". For people with preconceived ideas, I think they might feel this book does not sufficiently address the topic. It does not cover all the bases by any stretch of the imagination.
The book is relatively light on content; maybe 150 pages of it; but it doesn't cost much either. For what it is, the content is okay, but I don't think anybody should come away from this book thinking they know all about how to do anything.
I guess I would say this book provides some information about the issues involved in running Linux on a PC-style computer which has limited resources such as RAM and nonvolatile storage, and could help someone with a hardware setup like that to get it going with Linux.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Srinivas Addagarla on July 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
This was the only book available on embeeded linux in the market. Linux is making roads in embedded systems. But there is very little information available on the subject. This book gives a basic foundation for system engineers who wants to use linux in their embedded projects. The books explains why linux is more pertinent for embedded projects; the advantages/disadvantages of using linux in embedded systems; how to build a smalles possible linux system; choosing the right hardware for embedded linux; Embedded linux tool kits available in the market; how to boot embedded linux from flash memory; Debugging embedding linux. There is a chapter on the success stories of embedded linux (TIVO, Axis Network camera). Embedded linux resources are given in an appendix. The coverage is not exhaustive but presentation of the material is good; John has done a good job.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
A major disappointment - most of this book can be found on the Internet using any search engine. Save your money and nerves, and go to the Linux Documentation Project.
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