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180 of 187 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Lightweight Set - Comparisons w/ other SS sets
This is a very nice set of lightweight stainless steel cookware. If you are shopping around and trying to compare the differences, I will try to help you distinguish the features from a couple of other brands that I currently own. In addition to this set, I have the Rachael Ray stainless and also the Kitchen Aid stainless.

First of all, the Emeril pots and...
Published on September 19, 2012 by RETSmile

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71 of 82 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Acceptable for the price
This is an acceptable set of cookware, which will serve you just fine if you are a college student cooking a few meals a week, or you are buying a set for infrequent use at a vacation home, etc. It is made of bright stainless steel, which we prefer over nonstick for many reasons, google "nonstick" to see why. This set cleans up nicely, and the lids fit well...
Published on August 30, 2012 by Dave Millman


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180 of 187 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Lightweight Set - Comparisons w/ other SS sets, September 19, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a very nice set of lightweight stainless steel cookware. If you are shopping around and trying to compare the differences, I will try to help you distinguish the features from a couple of other brands that I currently own. In addition to this set, I have the Rachael Ray stainless and also the Kitchen Aid stainless.

First of all, the Emeril pots and pans are by far the lightest weight. The Rachael Ray comes in the middle with very thick bottoms and thinner sides, and the Kitchen Aid is by bar the thickest and heaviest. I think what you want here is going to come down to personal preference. The RR and the Emeril brands have clear glass lids, while the KA is all stainless. All of the Emeril pieces are standard sizes, whereas you get really deep pieces in the RR collection. The KA pieces are just substantial.

The handles on the RR and KA have protective grips, whereas the Emeril handles are all stainless. I think this is going to personal preference as well. Do you want a sleek all stainless appearance or is having protective grip handles more important?

The Emeril set has some nice features that you don't find in the others. The pots all have measurement lines engraved inside the pots so you can fill to your specific needs without having to grab a measuring cup. The saucepan has pour spouts on each side with a lid you can twist to keep it sealed while cooking then open for pouring from the pan. Also included in this set is a vegetable steamer/strainer basket to fit in your large pot (I love this!). You also get the small wok shape pan.

Overall, this is a great set of cookware with nice features. When compared with the others for cooking performance, I don't notice much difference. When I begin cooking more soups and veggies for the winter I may notice and I will post then any marked differences such as will it hold heat as well since it is a thinner stainless. It's dishwasher safe and I will post any reliability notes in the future. This set looks sleek and is easy to maneuver if you prefer lightweight pots and pans. The extra features are a nice plus. I'm glad I've added it to my cooking arsenal. - I'm posting a pic so you can see actual set in kitchen.
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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but the competition is better and cheaper., August 24, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Stainless steel cookware is great to look at and cook with, we can all agree on that. Depending on your style preferences, one brand may suit your needs better than others. This Emeril set follows the same path - great cookware, but...it's not as good as others.

Most of my cooking is currently done with Cooks Standard Multi-Ply Clad Stainless-Steel 10-Piece Cookware Set. It's beautiful, tough, heats evenly, and...overall, better than this Emeril set, though Emeril does win out in a couple of features.

First off, both sets look awesome. Both are made in China, so it's a level playing field. This Emeril set has glass lids, whereas the Cooks Standard has mirror-shiny stainless lids. I prefer the steel lids because the glass looks cheaper, and when I'm cooking, looking "through" the glass usually does nothing at all: I see steam.

Next, both sets heat quickly and evenly. Preheat and apply some olive oil, and you have yourself a stick-free pan, either way. But again, this Emeril set lags behind a bit: The Cooks Standard set has handles that DO NOT heat up. Emeril...they get warmer and warmer; cook long enough, and they're going to be hot. Also, the surface area of the smallest skillets is different, with the Emeril one having quite a small surface that actually comes into contact with the heating element. It's deeper than the Cooks Standard, but I don't use a frying pan to cook top-down; more heating area is better for how and what I cook.

Unpacking this set for the first time, I felt the Emeril pots and pans felt a bit lightweight to what I was used to. Then I had to put my theory to the test. The Cooks Standard set has more metal: maybe not much, but in one case, the Emeril 1.5qt saucepan weighed in at 1.484 pounds, while the Cooks Standard was 1.746 pounds. Whether it affects the cooking or not, I can't really tell and don't notice a difference, but after simply handling them, the Cooks just feels more solid.

But all is not lost with this Emeril set: the smallest saucepan has fluted sides to make it much easier to pour liquids. Also, the lid comes with a straining side built-in (so you can turn the lid and pour out liquid, without food coming out too.) I thought those were pretty nice, and wish my other set had them. In addition, the Emeril set has measuring marks inside the saucepans, which, I suppose, might come in handy. (Then again, they're printed not etched, and since these are fairly new, it's difficult to tell if they'll rub off with a month of cooking.) Another thing that bothered me just a tiny bit: of all the stainless cookware sets I've owned, ALL of them have had 18/10 printed or etched somewhere on them. I couldn't find such designation anywhere on this Emeril set.

Overall, this is a good set, but if you want a better set AND to save some money (though you do get 2 fewer pieces), go with the Cooks Standard. Both have a lifetime warranty. I gave this set the same 4 stars that I gave the Cooks Standard because they both perform well, but if I had to cook with only one set (or buy only one set), it wouldn't be this one...
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71 of 82 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Acceptable for the price, August 30, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is an acceptable set of cookware, which will serve you just fine if you are a college student cooking a few meals a week, or you are buying a set for infrequent use at a vacation home, etc. It is made of bright stainless steel, which we prefer over nonstick for many reasons, google "nonstick" to see why. This set cleans up nicely, and the lids fit well.

However, I recommend against purchasing this set for heavy, every-day use. Reasons:

1. The metal is quite thin. This makes the pots lighter than others with thicker walls, but they do not transfer the heat as well. Definitely not for gourmet dishes when heat control is critical!
2. The handles are metal, no insulation. This is not much of a problem on the long handles, but three pots have short handles. This is especially inconvenient for the large "everyday" wok-like pot, which you will likely want to tip as you cook.

I wanted to give this set three and a half stars. As I thought about whether to round up or down, I noticed that this set is billed as a "Restaurant Chef's" set. A set like this wouldn't last six months in a restaurant, where they cook dozens of dishes per night in each pan. Emeril wouldn't be caught dead using them. These little deceptions were enough cause for me to round down to 3 stars. You can do better with other sets.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For value, looks, and lightweight - a winner, August 17, 2013
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This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
I am a Vine guy, but I bought this set of pans with my own money. I like the Emeril name and I already had an Emeril 'chef's pan' that I bought at Bed, Bath and Beyond a few years ago; I've always enjoyed using that pan, which is vaguely wok-like, and I thought I'd see if I liked this set as much. I love to cook and have been doing so regularly for 20 years; I've used cast iron, QVC stainless steel, 80's style Corning Visions glass cookware, 60's style Club brand pure thick aluminum pots, crummy aluminum lightweight backcountry camping cookware, Le Creuset and Staub enamelware, cheap Teflon nonstick, middle-of-the-road nonstick, and the very best Anolon Advanced nonstick. I've fondled a lot of All-Clad - never cooked with any - and I've even used pure bright-copper pots and skillets, though goodness knows a set costs more than a car these days.

I like to write a long review and I've been using these pans exclusively for about 2 months as I thought about what folks might want to know about this set. I like this set pretty well for what it's good at; I feel the same way about a lot of different kinds of cookware and so I will talk about appearance, quality, ease of use/ergonomics, cooking performance, cleanup, and how different parts of the set stack up to other things I like to use.

First off: appearance. The first week out of the box I had every piece out on my rangetop and counter. It's gorgeous. This is good chrome steel with a nice mirror finish on the outside and a nice satin finish on the inside. I expect it to develop a nice patina - indeed some of the pans are already headed that way - and if you like a nice looking set of cookware you won't go wrong here. The lids are glass - I like to see through my lids, that's just me - and the long handles are shiny and nicely bulbous, no edges. (The small handles that are made of bent bar stock are dull-finished and have edges, which makes them not very nice to hold while they are hot, one of many ways this set falls short of the All-Clad name it bears.) Handles are riveted in with small rivets but the joints are solid enough that they conduct heat readily.

The stockpot is smaller than I thought it'd be from the Amazon photo. It's 10 quarts. Works great - eating chicken soup from it today - but not big enough to, say, brew the wort for a 5 gallon batch of beer. I complained to my mother about this, which was a mistake, maybe, because she went into her garage and got me a 14 quart Anolon clad steel stockpot she has had stored away for 20 years, still in the original box. Mom's awesome. She was once a professional chef and probably has enough cookware in the garage to stock 10 homes; most of the stuff I've cooked on was hers.

Quality: No aluminum is visible. The sides of these pots, skillets and pans are very thin walled, maybe 2 mm, where an All-clad pot is closer to 6mm. The bases of these pots are thicker, maybe 4 mm. The two pieces of steel make a 'sandwich' where the inside third layer is aluminum - at least I assume so. They certainly spread and conduct heat lightning quick, much faster than steel usually would. These are the lightest-weight (apart the camping gear) and quickest and most evenly heating pans I've ever used, more on that later. I feel like they're light enough that I might dent them with a hammer, or if I ran my kitchen like one of Emeril's rowdy restaurant kitchens, but I can't see that happening in my quiet little house.

The volume gradations on the inside of the pots is a neat idea and actually was a motivator for me to get these pots. I am sorry to report they are printed on, the same way Henckels and Global knives print on their knife blades; I expect they'll last a year, no longer. I was hoping - kind of thought - they would be stamped in and actually permanent. Nope.

Ease of use: there is this new techology that's available, lots of reviewers haven't heard of it yet. It's called potholders. You're going to need a few to use these pots - no option - because there has been no effort made to stop any handle from getting hot. The handles get very hot. They will burn you badly if you do not use a potholder. You must have a potholder. Some of the handles get as hot as the cooking surface, which I regard as questionable design. I love that the pots are light, which makes them much less likely to slip out of my glove / potholder; I can swish or flip food with a flick of my wrist, like you see big thick-armed Mario Batali types do on Iron Chef. I can't do that with cast iron, though I'm pretty sure Mario has no problem with it. (I've been to 3 of Emeril's restaurants, one with an open kitchen; looks to me like all his chefs use cast iron pans and steel pots, not these.) I like the way the long handles fit my hand, which is 7.5 size; I do not like the lid handles or the stockpot handles, they feel sharp-edged - not knife-sharp, but unpleasant to bear weight on the fingers - and I feel like my fingers are a little too fat for the narrow space those handles leave for them. Since I'm usually using a potholder it's not a real problem.

Cooking performance: For simmering and medium temperature saucing and soupmaking, these are ideal. Heat transfer is swift, immediate, and super efficient - these pots probably save natural gas, all the heat goes to the food; and they're light enough to easily move around the kitchen with no fear of droppy/burny accidents. (Cork mats, friend - put one everywhere a pot might want to be.) However, these are the easiest tasks and most pots perform well at them. These pots clean up OK afterwards, much better than copper or cast iron, nowhere near as easily as nonstick (although I hate simmering things in plastic, it just doesn't sit well with me.)

Now let's talk about higher heat. Say, like sauteing, or stir fry, or even a sear. These pans *transfer* heat super evenly and super efficiently. But they are light and have no way to *retain* heat. They are a poor *reservoir* of heat energy. What that means is they heat up lightning quick - often way, way hotter than you wanted them to; and then when you put the food in, or your deglaze, they suddenly drop 300-500 degrees and suddenly now you're not sauteing or deglazing, even though just 3 seconds ago your pot was hot enough to melt Tina Turner's vinyl miniskirt. Sitting there trying to re-warm a pot full of soggy pork bits and boozy cognac is a sorry excuse for a deglaze and it never really tasted quite right yet; I don't think i'm going to be able to get it right. The other problem, though, is that when you do get the pan that hot - especially if you're trying to, say, sear a hangar steak or something - your steel's not stainless any more. The first time I used a sauteed-kale recipe that I'd been doing in a thicker clad stainless pan for years - lightly brown diced garlic in olive oil; add chopped kale and a touch of salt and red pepper; saute lightly 2 minutes, then wilt, covered, for 5 minutes more - the pan discolored as soon as the kale hit it; and then the kale wouldn't saute; I had to heat it up another minute to get it warm again. Then when I covered it it heated up to insane temperatures on the lowest heat my range would do. It ended up soggier than usual and the pan surface was permanently stained - even after an SOS pad. (I don't like using Barkeeper's Friend or SOS, but you'll need something like them if you don't want the skillet pans getting downright ugly inside.)

What about very low heat, like omelet? Forget about it; you simply cannot get precise enough due to the high temp fluctuations of these pans. Your omelet will be scorched and runny. (The best omelet pans I've found are nonstick, the only thing I like using nonstick for; the thicker the base, and the lower the heat, the better.) You could maybe scramble an egg tough without burning it in these pans, but forget about over easy. (The whole world already has forgotten over easy, the most challenging egg; I haven't gotten real over easy in a diner for more than a decade. So I *have* to be able to make it myself.)

Cleanup: These are totally OK in the dishwasher, although if you let the mirror surface rub, it'll scratch and develop patina. I use the dishwasher and I am hoping eventually to acquire a good old 18/10 style sweet glowy patina, but the inside of these pans is starting to show permanent black and brown stains, like the crappy 18/0 Oneida flatware I bought last year thinking it was the same as my old 18/8 flatware. (It wasn't; it looks worse now than the 15 year old stuff it was supposed to replace.)

This set is better to clean than cast iron by a long shot, better than anodized - much tougher; simply, however, not in the same league as even cheap nonstick. Food will stick and stains may need abrasive scrub and some stains won't scrub out. It used to be that use of metal utensils distinguished steel as superior to nonstick in cooking or cleaning; nowadays the best nonstick can take a fork poke without scratching, so steel lost that advantage.

Summary: I honestly think this set is designed to look like All-clad, but it costs less than a single piece of All-Clad cookware would. The pots are fine; it might make sense to buy this set just for them and then get one decent All-Clad skillet for higher-temperature work. Another option, which I didn't realize until after I bought, is that the Emeril chef pan I liked, the one with a 5mm thick chunk of copper clad into the base, is a Bed, Bath and Beyond exclusive. That pan *does* retain heat in its base and doesn't cause the problem I talked about above. But you can't buy those pans anywhere but BBBY - believe me, I looked; I'd forgotten that I got that pan at BBBY many years ago. Lately I learned they still carry that Emeril line; and that line's set, while I think with one fewer pot and one fewer lid, is price-competitive with this set. I might have bought that set instead if I'd realized that it was still being made. However for value, looks, and light weight I don't think this set can be beat!
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34 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a Deal!, September 20, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
For $200 you get: an 8-inch saute pan fry pan; a 10-inch saute pan/fry pan with glass lid; a 1.5-quart sauce pan with pouring spout and glass lid; 3-quart sauce pan and glass lid; a 3-quart steamer insert; an 11-inch everyday pan and glass lid; and a 6-quart stockpot and glass lid. It comes with this warranty:

"EMERILWARE STAINLESS Lifetime Warranty
From the date of purchase, All-Clad guarantees to repair or replace any item found defective in material, construction or workmanship under normal use and following care instructions. This excludes damage from misuse or abuse. Minor imperfections and slight color variations are normal."

That has to be a deal! The question is how does Emerilware compare to the prestigious "All-Clad?" I own both, so here's what I know.

PRICE: An All-Clad Tri-Ply Stainless-Steel 10-Piece Cookware Set sells at Williams Sonoma for $799.95 (list price is $1,225.00). The similar set of Emerilware sells on Amazon for $200!

CONSTRUCTION: Both Emerilware and All-Clad have the patented tri-ply construction with an aluminum core to deliver even heat distribution and are made from 18/10 stainless steel. The handles are similar, attached with two heavy rivets. All-Clad has metal lids, while Emerilware has glass lids. Both are oven-safe up to 500 degrees, but the glass lids are only oven-safe to 350 degrees.

The Emerilware design has one difference from the All-Clad. The sides are thinner and the pan is welded to a "heat diffuser disc" on the bottom to promote even cooking. The All-Clad pan is one-piece construction (except for the handle) and even thickness overall.

When I first held the Emerilware 10-inch saute pan, I thought that it had to be lighter than the similar All-Clad version. Upon weighing both, to my amazement I found only three grams difference! The extra weight in the Emerilware must be from the welded bottom, since the sides are noticeably thinner that those of the All-Clad pan.

ORIGIN: All-Clad Metalcrafters in Canonsburg, PA manufactures both the "All-Clad Tri-Ply Stainless-Steel Cookware" and "Emeril Pro-Clad Cookware." However, All-Clad is made in Pennsylvania and Emerilware is made in China. The price reflects this difference.

PERFORMANCE: How does Emerilware differ in performance? In theory, the All-Clad with the thicker sides should distribute and hold heat better than the Emerilware. Actually, I don't see enough difference to justify the enormous price disparity. Both can get stains and burned on food, but both come clean in minutes using Bar Keepers Friend® Cleanser & Polish: 12 OZ.

The bottom line is that Emerilware Pro-Clad is not All-Clad, but you're not paying for All-Clad. Emerilware looks like a bargain, to me.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Emeril vs. Kitchenaid, October 18, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I really had not cooked much with stainless steel until about a year ago. At that time I picked up this set: KitchenAid Gourmet Stainless Steel 10-Piece Cookware Set and greatly enjoyed using it. I was excited to give this set a go and see if there were any great differences between the two sets.

What you get:

Kitchenaid: 1 ˝ qt and 3 qt. Sauce pan, 8 qt. Stock pot, 3 qt. Sauté, 8 ˝ and 10 inch skillet, four appropriately sized lids with silicone seals. (10 pieces)
Emeril: 8-Inch Saute Pan Fry Pan 10-Inch Saute Pan / Fry Pan with Glass Lid 1.5-Quart Source Pan with Pouring Spout and Glass Lid 3-Quart Source Pan and Glass Lid 3-Quart Steamer Insert 11-Inch Everyday Pan and Glass Lid 6-Quart Stockpot and Glass Lid. (12 pieces)

What you notice:

Kitchenaid: This is a very basic set with a few nice features. The lids and handles are coated on the underside so you are not as apt to burn your hand when using them. The silicone seal on the lids appears to be durable. They have a nice weight so are light enough to use when filled but heavy enough to be stable.
Emeril: This is a much more attractive set of pots and pans and it looks like some thought went into creating a complete set for the average cook. The sauce pans in particular are so light that you worry a bit about them being "tippy".

What you find:

Kitchenaid: As I said, I cooked with these, pretty much daily, for a year. I liked them so much that I relegated my Calphalon hard-anodized set to the cabinet under the sink and assigned this set to my pot rack. My biggest issue with this set is the fact that it is quite hard to keep looking good. After a year the bottoms were a bit on the brown side and the pots themselves showed some scratches. I did put them in the dishwasher as instructed because that is one of the selling features and I wanted to see how they would hold up. (That isn't something I normally do with my pots and pans.) They clean up fine in the dishwasher, but if you want them all nice and shiny you need to do some scrubbing and lemon rubbing to get them that way.
Emeril: These perform just as well as the Kitchenaid, with one exception. The smaller sauce pan likes to tip over when empty on my gas range. I really keep an eye on it when heating oil too because I do worry. The pan seems more stable if the handle is placed to the center, naturally in this position it blocks my knobs. I do really like the two handled 11 inch everyday pan, with a large family it is oftentimes just the size I am looking for. I also have enjoyed the steamer insert; it fits nicely in the pot and is a good size for steaming a moderate quantity of produce. As for clean up, so far so good. As with the other set, I have put these in the dishwasher and they wash up well. The pots seem to hold their shine and not brown as easily as the other set, but time will tell. A lemon rub readily removes any rainbows in the pans and these pots are a pleasure to hang up on the rack.

What I think:

Either set is a very good value for the price. Emeril has the more complete set and is probably worth the extra bucks. I do have a serious issue with the stability of the smaller sauce pan though and have taken off a star for that. I intend to continue using this set for a few more months to check on wear and to make sure I don't find any other issues. I will update this review if anything comes up.

Recommended for the average home cook.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice mid-price pans, November 14, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a really nice set of mid-range pots and pans. If you are looking for All-Clad, you'd be better off saving your money and buying a piece of two of All-Clad. However, if you need a wide range of durable pots and pans for a decent price, I'd highly recommend these.

I've been using them for about two months and have done everything from roast a chicken to make soup and pasta. There are some really nice features of these pans:

--I love that the glass lid on the mid-size pot has a "steam" slot on the lid and a pouring guide. I didn't think I'd appreciate those things as much as I do but they've come in handy a few times.

--The larger pots have measurements on the inside of the pot.

--The steamer basket that fits inside the larger handled pot is a good size. It fits snugly and doesn't let steam out from between the steamer and the pot.

--All the lids fit snugly.

--The handles are solid metal. While this does add a little heft to the pan, it makes them stay cooler a little longer. If you are making something quick (like a grilled cheese), you won't need a hot pad for the handle. More than a few minutes though and you'll need one.

--These are easy to clean. I've done quite a bit with these and they always wash up easily and don't have that weird oily looking shine to them like some of my other stainless steel pans get.

All in all, I'd recommend these to a friend who is looking for a set of pots in this price range.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive heft and quality and performs superbly, August 21, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I have two other stainless steel cookware sets (one a gift and the other purchased separately) and the Emeril Stainless Steel set is significantly better than either of those. It is ideal for both experienced cooks as well as newlyweds or singles who may need more pots and pans.

Every basic type of pot and pan I could imagine needing for everyday and entertaining use was included, from sauce pans to a stock pot. In our home, the stock pot and steamer are likely to get the most use, although the fry pans will get their fair share as well.

Because we were expecting guests within days of receiving the set, I was ready and eager to test it out. So I unpacked the cookware and prepared both luncheon and dinner recipes, mainly all my old standbys. Everything arrived securely and without nicks or dents.

We have a unique cooktop, with regular electric burners on one side and two induction burners on the other side. I've bought so-called "stainless steel" sets which the induction burners failed to recognize. This was not the case with Emeril's pieces - a great relief!

Some of the meals I prepared were put into other containers and into the freezer. Freezer meals included beef vegetable soup and chicken noodle soup. I also cooked steamed rice and asparagus for dinner, each steamed separately, and made vegetarian chili to freeze ahead for guests who don't eat meat.

The rice steamed perfectly and the asparagus was ready within minutes, crisp/tender, just as we prefer it. As noted, I froze most of the dishes I cooked for guests but for tonight's dinner I made a stew and kept it hot in the oven, lid on, at 350 F. This is the recommended temperature if lids are on pots. Without lids, the stainless steel can take temps as high as 550 F (I didn't test this high temp out yet).

A pet peeve of mine is when pots and pans heat unevenly, allowing some dishes to burn at the bottom while the rest is still cooking. Yes, stirring frequently does help but it is nice to have cookware which allows one to step away for a bit without fear of botched meals. This set fits the bill.

Here are some more details of my experience with this set and if anything changes, I will update this review:

Practicality, performance, and accurate description: all items noted in the production description were included. Also as noted, the cooking performance was superb. I especially liked the combination steamer/colander because the pots holds 3 quarts of liquid and the steamer fits snugly in the pot. This is a nice size steamer for our family of four as well as large enough to make larger portions for guest meals.

My experience has been that steamers either perform well or they leave a great deal to be desired. This one steams very well and the colander piece drains quickly. Another favorite piece? The stock pot. It cooked every single vegetable and piece of meat as evenly as I'd hoped.

Clean-up of the pots and pans was a snap. I followed the care instructions included in an accompanying brochure (hot soapy water, dry immediately, no cleaners with chlorine bleach). Because the cookware is described as "dishwasher safe" I held my breath and did indeed put whatever I could fit into our dishwasher. They came out sparkling.

Steel wool scouring pads are not recommended but I avoid them anyway as we have plenty of non-stick cookware and I feel more comfortable keeping nylon scrubbing pads on hand. Being a bit picky, I also use special microfiber type cleaning clothes made for dishes but this is probably not necessary. However, it certainly does leave the stainless steel gleaming!

Information in a brochure included with the set is quite detailed. The cookware comes with a Lifetime Warranty as well as a contact number for any questions or concerns.

While I won't describe every one of the 12 pieces in this set in detail (don't want this review to turn into a book), each has a very nice weight and handles which flare out a bit at the ends, making them easy to grasp. The rims also have a very nice edge and shape, allowing the lids to fit well.

You do need to use potholders because the metal gets hot. If I could change one feature, I'd like some material on the ends of the handles so the cookware pieces could be lifted by hand - but this is really a small issue given the overall benefits.

While appearance of a cookware set is not nearly as important to me as performance, it was a bonus that each piece had a pleasing shape, attractive enough to use at the table while serving guest or family meals.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I bought this for my husband!, December 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
My husband LOVES to cook. I'm so lucky! He is just thrilled with this cookware. The quality is outstanding. He said it heats evenly and that the handles do not get hot. He said that if you cook with a hot pan and put cold oil in it that the food will not stick. I am looking at purchasing more Emeril Products for him.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice complete set, holding up well, November 10, 2012
This review is from: Emeril by All-Clad E884SC Chef's Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PFOA Free Cookware Set, 12-Piece, Silver (Kitchen)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I have tested this set out for several months now and I am satisfied with it. I wanted to put them through regular use for a while before reviewing them because sometimes I'll get a pot or pan that at first I think is great but it doesn't hold up well. So far these are all holding up well and are a nice complete set. Food cooks eveningly in them, I am not having a problem with food sticking and they clean up easily. I do not have a dishwasher so I've only washed them by hand, but the manual says these are dishwasher safe.
They are a good weight, not too light, not too heavy and it's a very nice looking set.
There are three personal preference things that I can see that a person would have to decide if it worked for them before purchasing:
1. The lids are safe only to 350 degrees in the oven (the rest up to 550 degrees). So if you have dishes that require lids at temps higher than that, these lids won't work.
2. The handles are bare, no protective grip. My personal preference is for there to be grips, avoids heat and makes them easier to hold.
3. Made in China.
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