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Emile Paperback – October 26, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1408629864 ISBN-10: 1408629860

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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (28 June 1712 2 July 1778) was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of 18th-century Romanticism of French expression. His political philosophy influenced the French Revolution as well as the overall development of modern political, sociological and educational thought. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Brownell Press (October 26, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408629860
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408629864
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,690,718 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

This work by Jean Jacques Rousseau probably represents the single greatest work in defining what we would call education today.
Yves Gary Loyer
As a psychologist AND as a dad / this is an essential resource and ought to be read by anyone who studies childhood or works professionally with children and parents.
Robert W. Smith
The introduction by P.D. Jimack is interesting and well written, helping the reader to have some perspective before reading the text.
L. Host

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Krupp on June 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
(Ignore my 2-star rating, I had to put in something in order to get this review online.)

As I cross-checked the passages that most interested me with the French edition, I was surprised to find that *entire paragraphs* are left out of the Everyman's Library English translation. Allan Bloom's translation is complete, and is also quite good. And it's available in paperback. Definitely purchase the Bloom translation instead of this one.
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Robert W. Smith VINE VOICE on April 15, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
i read this briskly for my childhood psychology class decades ago. i reread it this week. the author discusses his plentiful observations on raising a child. while some suggestions are really common sense / It is exciting to note how his observations formulated later child and developmental and educational theorists. As a psychologist AND as a dad / this is an essential resource and ought to be read by anyone who studies childhood or works professionally with children and parents. It is unduly wordy as is typical of the era. I give it a solid A and highly recommend it.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Manuel Haas on July 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
Rousseau's "Emile" is a must read for everybody who is interested in education. The book may be more than 200 years old, but many of its insights could come up in any brand new treatise about modern methods of teaching.
"Emile" is the fictitious account of the ideal education of a boy. (Maybe it was Rousseau's way of dealing with his own failures as a father.) Rousseau believes that education must be to blame for the deplorable state of the world, as "Everything is good that the Lord has made, it only degenerates in the hands of man." So Rousseau rejects the drill and cruelty of the schools of his times, he opts for freedom and learning by doing. Much of this is utopian, of course, but in one of his brilliant remarks Rousseau claims that "saying: Suggest something that can be done, is like saying: suggest what we have been doing all along."
This is one of the most brilliant books I have ever read. If you read just one book about education, make it this one, even if you are not prepared to agree with Rousseau.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Yves Gary Loyer on October 31, 2001
Format: Paperback
This work by Jean Jacques Rousseau probably represents the single greatest work in defining what we would call education today. I am a Francophone living in Northern Ontario and so I have read just the french version, but barring that I believe that Rousseau was ahead of his time. His simple theory of education was the floor from which many other pedagogues would follow(Pestalozzi, Montessori, Itard, Séguin, among others). His theory of child development established him in all fairness, as the first psychologist of all time.
'The punishment is the natural consequence of the error' Such a novel concept for a time so tumultuous. One other statement is the following' You must begin by first knowing your children, because on the whole you do not'. Rousseau passions me and I believe him to be the reason why education turned towards the children rather than the teachers.
To conclude, I can say most assuredly that Rousseau, with his avant-garde tactics, awoke the world to the concept of an education centered around the child. If you lose the child, you lose the concept of education.
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 4, 1998
Format: Paperback
This was a good translation of the book, though what really stood out was a thorough introduction. For Rousseau Scholars, Emile is one of Rousseau's major works: in part a treatise on education, we find in Emile Rousseau's illustration of a major theme -- man is intrisically good, but that goodness is beaten out of him from assorted external factors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angelika on March 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
A very, very interesting idea put into novel. It isn't so much about the fiction, more about the social ideals expressed through the narrative.
Of course, it is also a product of its time and in some regards seems downright archaic because of it, but, if one understands the context, it becomes a truly enlightening (in every sense) piece of literature.
"Emile" is one of those works that really deserves being read slowly while carefully considering its concepts - if only to understand an important keystone of how educational science came to be what it is today. There are of course faults and Rousseau fails to live up to his own standards on more than one occasion, but if you are interested in education it remains hugely interesting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By L. Host on November 23, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an interesting text that has continued to influence education since its original publication in 1762. This particular edition is nice, because of its size and being paperback, it is easily toted around.
The introduction by P.D. Jimack is interesting and well written, helping the reader to have some perspective before reading the text.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Ellingwood VINE VOICE on February 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I believe it was good to read Emile or on Education as I am an educator and want to learn more about the history of education. I also think it is important to read a book by Enlightenment philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau. I think Rousseau made very good points on how he would educate his male ward, Emile. There would be lots of outings, observations and he would like to delay teaching Emile how to read until the boy understood. a purpose of it. Many high performing Scandinavian countries delay grammar school until 7 so I think that is a good move on Rousseau's part. Rousseau also seems to believe that education is wasted on the poor and the poor child need only what he needs to survive, a good vocational education in the correct trade for his talents. Rousseau goes on strongly about religious teaching and feels that the authority of bone's church as determined by the father is important. Sophy is the female child Rousseau has conjured up, she is required only to receive enough education in order to run her household and entertain and interest her husband and raise their children. Sophy's education is harsh and circumspect. She needs to clean the house so she can tell servants how to do it and keep herself immaculate. She must always understand her role in her father's and husband's house and be able to entertain household guests. She is sensitive to gossip and doesn't put herself in any position that could mks construed. What a life for Sophy! Rousseau finally discusses that reading to much introduces the habit of thinking you know more than you do.. He insists man must travel in order to learn but acknowledges that closed minded people often travel without learning. Anyway he brings Emile and Sophy to marriage and childbirth where they will educate a child of there own.
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