The Emperor Justinian and the Byzantine Empire and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$44.60
Qty:1
  • List Price: $46.95
  • Save: $2.35 (5%)
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Emperor Justinian and... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Emperor Justinian and the Byzantine Empire (Greenwood Guides to Historic Events of the Ancient World) Hardcover – January 30, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0313325823 ISBN-10: 0313325820 Edition: annotated edition

Buy New
Price: $44.60
19 New from $44.60 11 Used from $40.14
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$44.60
$44.60 $40.14
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

$44.60 FREE Shipping. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Emperor Justinian and the Byzantine Empire (Greenwood Guides to Historic Events of the Ancient World) + Justinian: The Last Roman Emperor
Price for both: $74.26

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Series: Greenwood Guides to Historic Events of the Ancient World
  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Greenwood; annotated edition edition (January 30, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313325820
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313325823
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,526,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The author has succeeded in providing an appealing and eminently accessible taster to this fascinating period…"

-

Journal of Classics Teaching



"[F]or high school to college collections….[p]roviding an introduction to Justinian's reign and time. Biography blends with history using annotated primary documents to provide a review of the Late Antiquity and its influences….An excellent reference."

-

MBR Bookwatch



"Evans provides an introduction to Justinian's reign and time through descriptive chapters, biographical sketches, and annotated primary documents. An overview of late antiquity is followed by chapters on the shape of the Empire, the Nike revolt of 532, the legal achievements of Justinian, the Empress Theodora, Justinian's building program, and imperial achievements as a whole."

-

Reference & Research Book News/Art Book News Annual



"Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and two-year technical program students; general readers."

-

Choice



"[A] handy, reliable account of the era complete with biographies of notable characters, a very useful glossary of terms, and a selection of major documents bearing on the reign of Emperor Justinian. The glossary is particularly welcome because the nonspecialist readership often finds Byzantine religious and theological concepts daunting. The twenty documents, selected by Evans, shed light on the rule of Justinian and the complex issues and relationships of that time….[t]his work does much to open up for upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and general readers the Byzantine world of Emperor Justinian. One can say that Evans has accomplished his task and has produced a readable work on that important era."

-

The Historian

Book Description

This survey of the reign of the Emperor Justinian and the Byzantine Empire dissects the complicated political and military environment surrounding Constantinople and the Byzantine Empire in the 6th Century CE, and discusses the ambitions and achievements of the Emperor Justinian.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 22, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Justinian's reign was the a high point of the final days of the Roman Empire - besieged from within and without, the Roman Empire was based administratively in Constantinople, and had all but lost contact with the 'Eternal City', the home of its origin, Rome. There was a definite East/West split that had already begun to solidify linguistically and culturally, and there were increasing tensions in the now-officially Christian Empire as to just what kind of Christianity was going to be the official line.

When he was born, Justinian wasn't really meant to be Emperor. His uncle Justin came to power somewhat unexpectedly, but Justinian adapted to the coming responsibility with shrewdness and ability. He has been called the last of the Romans for good purpose; the city of Rome itself had been sacked by Visigoths and Vandals in the preceding century, and the western lands were more often than not in open defiance of Roman authority. When they were officially Roman, they were as often demanding as they were supportive. Justinian's long reign enabled him to reunite most of the old Roman Empire one final time. After Justinian, no one would be able to reunite East and West again.

There were different groups pressing at the borders of the Empire - the various European tribes of peoples, from Goths and Germans to Slavs, pressed in on the northern borders with increasing power. The African provinces were increasingly problematic, and the ancient enemy to the east, the Persians (formerly Parthians). Justinian was the last emperor to expand territory and defend against the invaders on all the fronts.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Douglas E. Libert on October 15, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition
The eastern Roman Emperor Justinian is most famous for his Civilis Juris,that his his interpretation of Roman Laws;alot of the interpretations of which can still hold up today.The book is only 178 pages long,very readable and gives short chapters in regard to significant epochs and events of Justinians' reign.He was a christian emperor so concerned with orthodoxy that at times he seems more like a pope than a Caesar.In fact the term Caesaropapism was coined to describe him.The book also has a glossary of Byzantine Empire terms that are unique to the Eastern Roman Empire of Justinian.
However despite all his concerns with laws and orthodoxy the eastern Empire is anything but a Pax Romana,with Invasions ,Counterinvasions,Riots over food and chariot race drivers,etc.The book spends a significant amount of time on the different writers of the Justinian Age and explores some of their motivations for explaining Justinians reign as they did.Lots of black and white pictures of Justinians ambitious building constructions.Despite all the lofty pronouncements of Justinian you still get the feeling there was lots of ways of skirting the laws like is still done today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This work is a nice small hard back book with no dust cover. However, the cover contains a color picture of a mosaic of Justinian and what appear to be members of his court. But this is the only color picture on or in this book. There are a few pages of black and white photos in the center of the book illustrating Justinian's building program. There are no maps. This book is divided into about three major sections to include an easy read of the reign of Justinian, Biographies of known entities during the reign of Justinian and of primary documents from the same period. What I learned from this book is that Justinian was first and foremost a reformer. Civil servants caught accepting bribes during his reign were tortured until they released the wealth to the Emperor or until death at which time the wealth was confiscated. Other forms of religion of the two state Christian versions were not tolerated; various flavors of convert or lose all of your property to be turned over to the Church or the Emperor. Justinian levied the subjects of the Empire with heavy taxes. Justinian professed the Christian faith and nearly bankrupted the Byzantine Empire with a massive building program (to include the Hagia Sophia) and to some extent uniting the empire through military re-conquest of lands lost. However, this unification was nowhere near the size of Constantine's Empire. Justinian as the reformer issued many edicts or laws that as the circumstances dictated he himself did not follow. The Roman Empire would never again reach the size and glory of Justinian's. Justinian did not rise thru the ranks of the Army. He was adopted by Justin I and was groomed to be the Emperor as Justin I's successor. The east and west cultures progressed differently to include the two versions of Christianity.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By mjare on December 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This short book is well-written. It is also very informative source of knowledge about the reign of Justinian. Author made an attempt of Justinian's conquests justification. Previously some historians condemned Justinian for his attempts of the Roman Empire restoration in the western part of the Mediterranean Sea. They claimed that Justinian left eastern borders of his Empire without the proper protection, what in their opinion might be confirmed by the sack of Antiochia by Persian troops in 540 AD. Evans shows in his book that eastern provinces were also very important in Justinian's policy. An author clearly emphasizes the role of the empress Teodora, which she had in the imperial policy in those times. Her influence on the Justinian's decisions was huge. For instance she convinced her husband Justinian to suppress the Nika Riots, which were directed against their rule. I find the collection (at the end of the book) of short biographies of people, who were involved in the main events of the Justinian's reign very useful and informative.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?