Empire As A Way of Life and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $3.89 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Empire As A Way of Life: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Appears to have been read. Small wrinkle / bend on front cover. Small wrinkle / bend on pages.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Empire As A Way of Life: An Essay on the Causes and Character of America's Present Predicament Along with a Few Thoughts about an Alternative Paperback – September 1, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0977197231 ISBN-10: 0977197239

Buy New
Price: $12.06
27 New from $7.71 20 Used from $6.40
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.06
$7.71 $6.40
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Empire As A Way of Life: An Essay on the Causes and Character of America's Present Predicament Along with a Few Thoughts about an Alternative + The Radical Politics of Thomas Jefferson
Price for both: $24.36

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Ig Publishing (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977197239
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977197231
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #775,195 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

William Appleman Williams (1921-1990) was one of the 20th century's most prominent historians of American diplomacy. His The Tragedy of American Diplomacy is often described as one of the most influential books written on American foreign policy, and Empire As A Way of Life is considered a seminal work on the study of American imperialism. Andrew J. Bacevich is a professor of international relations at Boston University, former director of its Center for International Relations (from 1998 to 2005), and author of several books, including the recently published The New American Militarism: How Americans are Seduced by War (2005) and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of US Diplomacy (2002).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
6
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Received item in a timely manner.
v1114
This book written by a superb free mind, is a must read for all those interested in human history and for all those who want to understand the world we live in.
Luc REYNAERT
Many of these opinions do not line up with most of my readings of other substantial historians.
Richard E. Noble

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. Moss on April 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
The two brief reviews of Empire as a Way of Life need brief comment themselves. First, Williams was not a Marxist though he certainly admired the contributions of Karl Marx to our understanding of how the modern world came into being. He was also curious about how it came to pass that Marx fell into intellectual oblivion.
Second, Williams meant Empire as a Way of Life to be an essay to be read by the widest possible audience and certainly not one to be read after his much more detailed, complex works on diplomacy. And so it happened: Empire became a book widely read by lower division college students in history, political science, and sociology. We welcome the book in its new edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. Lindner on November 27, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though dead for sixteen years, it is remarkable how much of a visionary William Appleman Williams truly was. He opens this book with a description of how America's political system has transformed our original ideology into an empire that is ever thirsting for new markets and how we've become more or less a slave to our own creation. Since so few people participate in our political system, our system has devolved into empire, though it remains Williams' hope that somehow this will change. This book is his attempt to illustrate how empire has emerged through the machinations of members of each political party who choose to follow the path of empire. This path has led America to be at odds with much of the rest of the world as we attempt to satisfy our need for growth.

Readers should be forwarned that much of Williams' arguments in this book are rehashings of ideas he put forth with much more detail in Contours of American History, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy, and The Roots of the Modern American Empire. Empire as a Way of Life should not be a reader's first encounter with Williams. His earlier works illustrate how deep Williams'knowledge of US history truly is. What this book does is develop his earlier arguments into a concise indictment of our society and its need for empire to sustain our growth. Williams points out that this does not need to be the case, but disinterest amongst American voters and the corporate world's ability to manipulate the issues creats the reality in which empire thrives.

According to Williams, most, but not all, presidents give in to demands for empire and in reality do a disservice to the rest of the world and to our own ideology.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT on April 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
In this superb analysis W.A. Williams unveils the continuous hypocrisy of US home and foreign policy. Expansion, conquest and intervention are transformed into `a pious rhetoric of virtue, wealth, freedom and democracy'. In reality, those in power destroyed the cultures of the First Americans, conquered half of Mexico and denied liberty, equality and welfare to large numbers of people at home and abroad.

The roots of these policies are to be found in the surplus production of agricultural and, later, industrial products and the need to conquer overseas markets for selling these surpluses. In other words, it was (is) waging wars for trade. By the way, the surplus proceeds went (go) to a minority.

The few who rule the US see an imperial policy as the end and purpose of American culture. They want to be the just judge (and jury), the center of global government and the policeman enforcing that power!
But for W.A. Williams, it is an illusion to reap the rewards of empire without paying its costs and without admitting that the US is an empire.
As H.J. Raymond said: `I greatly fear we shall sacrifice our liberties to our imperial dreams.'
Already in 1980, 50 % of all US scientists and engineers were employed in military work and 53 % of all tax dollars were used for military operations (more than double the health + education budget).

The author also criticizes heavily Roosevelt's New Deal, because it created an institutional link between the huge companies and the military. Power became even more consolidated and centralized. The State and the large corporations had become the Very Visible Hands oiling the economic process by taxes imposed on ordinary citizens, while the proceeds went (go) to ...

For W.A.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By zwandy on May 31, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read this for an early American Lit class - as some background material for what we would be covering.

Williams is probably one of the most influential writers in the field of American studies that deals with the United States' empirical nature. This particular work was written at the end of his scholarly career, so it's pretty beefy in the way of solid textual evidence to back up his claims, but his claims are still a bit out there for me - for instance, according to Williams, Lincoln was only fighting the Civil War for his own interests in gaining "fortune and fame."

Like I said, Williams' claims, no matter how out-there they are, are well argued and supported, but I think he has the tendency to oversimplify issues and events that are far more complex than he makes them out to be. Oversimplifying a claim makes it much easier to argue and support, so it's easy to see what sort of tactic he's taking in tackling the subject matter he's chosen, but the amount of textual evidence is still very impressive at times, and I think the work is worth reading in respect for the amount of research that went into it alone.

Read this, keeping in mind that Williams is taking just ONE path in the study of American imperial culture. I don't think many could argue against the claim that 'empire' is a 'way of life' for the United Sates, but I think one can argue just how much good or bad it's actually done for modern human history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?