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Empty Harvest Paperback – January 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Avery Trade; Reprint edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 089529558X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895295583
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #853,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

"Is our nation's 'bread basket' becoming a dead basket?" The authors of this book contend that we are breaking down our soil ecosystem and that modern-day agriculture is out of sync with nature. Artificial soil produces artificial food. Today's mineral-deficient soil may be "one of the greatest original sources of disease." This book is divided into two uneven parts, with each author--Jensen is a nutritionist and Anderson an ecologist--responsible for a part. The book lacks footnotes, which would lend it more legitimacy, and it could be better focused on its main maessage of the interconnectedness of human and earth. But it asks questions, makes accusations, and suggests solutions that should be heard. Recommended for public health or nutrition collections in public libraries.
- Diane M. Brown, Univ. of California at Berkeley Lib.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Dr. Bernard Jensen was one of America’s pioneering nutritionists and iridologists. Beginning his career in 1929 as a chiropractor, he soon turned to the art of nutrition for his own health problems. He observed firsthand the cultural practices of people in more than fifty-five countries, discovering important links between food and health. In 1955, Dr. Jensen established the Hidden Valley Ranch in Escondido, California as a retreat and learning center dedicated to the healing principles of nature where he saw firsthand the value of nutrition and iridology.

Over the years, Dr. Jensen received many honors and awards, including Knighthood in the Order of St. John of Malta; the Dag Hammarskjold Peace Award of the Pax Mundi Academy in Brussels, Belgium; and an award from Queen Juliana of the Netherlands for his nutritional work. In 1982, he also received the National Health Federation’s Pioneer Doctor of the Year award.

Mark Anderson is a recognized authority on the topics of global ecology and wholistic health. He has spent years traveling the world to study and teach clinical nutrition from the soil up. His stimulating and informative lectures on traditional diets, health patterns of native peoples, and agriculture have been featured at seminars and conferences in Africa, Asia, Europe, and India, as well as throughout the United States and Canada. Mark’s articles about natural approaches to nutrition and health have been published in scores of professional health journals in the United States.

 

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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I hope everyone who wants to improve their health reads this book.
Jillybean16
I was psyched to read this book simply because of the title, even though when I skimmed through it in the store it looked great.
Mark T. Brody
I have been so touched by this book; it has tranformed my attitude and thoughts about my health, the earth and environment.
L. Prosser

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Wasserman on January 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
Empty Harvest clearly explains the link between the lack of minerals in our crop soils and the modern day diseases associated with mineral deficiencies (diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc.). The author shows many excellent examples of how mankind is slowly destroying it's future by robbing the Earth of the very things that give us and support life itself.
Empty Harvest is a "wake-up call" for us to start changing our destructive ways, or poor physical and mental health and disease will dominate our lives into the 21st Century and beyond!
By following many of the guidelines in Empty Harvest (especially eating foods grown in nutrient rich soils & taking plant derived major & trace mineral supplements from organic sources), we can maintain or regain optimum health.
Anyone who thinks they are getting all the essential vitamins and minerals they need from the produce section at their local supermarket needs to read Empty Harvest TODAY!
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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Jones on January 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book explains many aspects of nutrition and what we have done wrong over the years with our diets. I have never seen a book with more quality information and that information is exactly what we need to look at for the causes of many of the diseases we see today. I am a Doctor who deals a lot with nutrition and it is the best book I have ever read on the subject.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By L. Prosser on December 5, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just finished reading this book and have started to re-read it. I have been so touched by this book; it has tranformed my attitude and thoughts about my health, the earth and environment. I only hope that everyone who reads my review will read this book or, at least, consider an organic diet in support of preventative health and farmer's whose growing methods are replinishing the valuable topsoil and doing away with highly toxic chemicals. It is hard to believe what "modern society" has done to our planet and health in such a short amount of time. I hope that, one person at a time, we can undo the damage that has been done. A sincere Thank You to the late Bernard Jenson for such thorough and insightful research.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gracewriter on December 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book should be adopted by our school systems. the most profound read I think I've ever had. a real eye opener.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Guy Denutte on February 13, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Modern" agriculture implemented in its production process fertilizers which are being processed out of oil. Nitrogen, phosphor and potassium (NPK) are being supplied to plants, but without trace elements. Since plants are incapable of producing minerals, when you eat vegetables or fruits you don't get enough of those. So you have two options. Capitalism likes you to buy "supplements", so they can make an extra dollar. If you are more intelligent, you definitively go for organics. Dr Jensen says this makes sense, for your health and even for your pocketbook, although organics are sometimes more expensive : "If you have to pay two dollars a pound for certified organically grown grapes, versus sixty-nine cents a pound for sprayed grapes, let me point something out : It's better to pay a lot for something than a little for nothing. You're always ripped off no matter how little you pay for nothing. This is an economic fact."
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Paul on April 13, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this thinking it might have some hardcore science (in a digestible form for the layman) like 'The Hundred-Year Lie' or 'Our Stolen Future'. It is much more lightweight than that - although it is basically a scientific discussion, it does not have any great depth. It discusses depletion of the soil, knock-on effect on human health, and general environmental issues. I liked the tone and sincerity of the authors, and liked it enough to read all the way through, but didn't feel like I learned that much. On a related topic, there's a good and more up-to-date book about what makes healthy soil (and food... and people...) called 'We Want Real Food' by Graham Harvey.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Gary Greenfield on January 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
The premise of the book's subtitle - Understanding the Link Between Our Food, Our Immunity and Our Planet - got my attention. And, for the most part, the authors succeed in making their central point. They connect the dots between the quality of the soil, the harvest, our immune system, and our health. This level of holistic thinking is an important foundational piece of any conversation about the systems that are involved in creating personal and planetary health.

The two authors contribute separate sections of the book. Dr. Bernard Jenson is often eloquent and impassioned, and his photographs alone are a powerful testimonial to his ideas. Mark Anderson writes knowledgably about nutrition and provides interesting historical background on agricultural science and nutrition research - and the work of special interest groups to suppress unfavorable findings and individuals, and corporations who promote bogus notions. [Did you know that smoking cigarettes was once advertised as an aid to digestion? Yikes!]

On the whole, this book mostly lives up to its promise, but it does so somewhat unevenly. Most scientific material is explained and substantiated in some detail - vitamin C, candida albicans, calcium, and the symbiotic relationship between plants and soil. But other subjects receive such superficial treatment that they would have been better off omitted - the chapter on cleansing and detoxification is too general to be of real use to anybody considering implementing such a program.

The content and message of the book would have been better served with more skillful editing because the material often comes across as somewhat haphazardly organized, making it harder to reconnect the parts to the whole.
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