Emsa Perfect Beaker with Seal
Style Name: With SealChange
Price:$9.95+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

185 of 187 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon August 14, 2002
I'm a fairly serious cook, so I need to measure a lot. I use this beaker whenever I can, for both wet and dry ingredients.
It has several advantages: (1) it's narrower at the bottom, so when measuring a small quantity you get extra accuracy; (2) it has a curved lip for perfect pouring with literally zero drips; (3) it is marked in many different units such as cups, ounces, ml, etc.; (4) it is very light in weight yet unbreakable; (5) it feels really good in your hand.
It also has disadvantages: (1) it's not a good choice for hot liquids because it's plastic (I use Pyrex for that); (2) the wonderful big foot tends to be full of water when emptying the dishwasher. I solved #2 in 10 seconds by drilling a teensy hole near the top of the foot, so water drains out of it when inverted in the dishwasher.
If you are a serious cook and you buy this item and don't use it often, I'll be surprised.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
56 of 58 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 2001
It looks weird to most american kitchens. A beaker, you say? But once you use it -- you'll never go back. Ever.
I measure things and then shake to mix. Great for drinks, but also especially for cooking. Alton Brown on the TV Show Good Eats uses a similar one (not sure if they are the same). Pouring is a snap. Measuring is a snap.
A godsend for anyone whose hands shake too much to pour into a small spoon, or measuring cup that might tip over on the counter. Its sturdy base assures free-standing pouring, even for those of us with carpal tunnel or other folk of uncertain hand movements.
Once I used this, I found that many other tools became replaced. It has some classy looks going on too -- nice as well as functional.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2010
Based upon old-style measuring flasks apothecaries used , these break-resistant cylinders accurately measure amounts to up 2 cups or one pint.

They are at their best when measuring a bunch of liquids for a recipe. For example, if a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of water, 1 tablespoon of vanilla extract, a 1/4 cup of milk, and two tablespoons of honey, you can measure them all accurately in one cylinder in one pass. What I mean is that the most efficient way to measure all these liquids is to measure the honey into the flask, then add the tablespoon of vanilla (just add vanilla until the combined liquids reach the three tablespoon mark), then measure the milk and water. All in one flask at one time, with only one flask to wash. Neat, fast, and efficient.

My only complaint is that there are perhaps too many measuring scales on one flask: Pints, cups, fluid ounces, tablespoons, teaspoons, and mm/cc (which is great to have if you have both European and US recipes or cookbooks). They could eliminate the pint scale easily and made the others easier to read by spacing the remaining scales apart.

Alton Brown is a fan of these beakers, which is another great sign. So, if you cook a lot, especially bake or use recipes with lots of liquids in them, these are just about 'perfect'!

PS Hunt around on the Amazon site-I found two different prices for the exact same product.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
105 of 119 people found the following review helpful
on September 20, 2002
This would be better if it was made out of a better material. It is made out of really thin plastic. It doesn't seem like it would take much to break it. The lip doesn't act like a spout. It really could use a real spout. I find the plastic lid to be useless and easy to get lost. Other than that it is pretty cool. Getting used to it is tricky but it makes things easy. For example, if you are makeing a merinade using a recipe that calls for 1 cup of soy sauce and two tablespoons sugar, just fill it with soy sauce to the mark rotate the cup so you can see the tablespoon mark and add two tablespoons of sugar. This beaker would trully be a perfect beaker if it was made of heat resistant glass, had non hollow(solid) base, and came in a four cup size. Two cups is fine for most measuring utensils, but when you have a beaker like this one you can start making you sauce/marinade etc.. right in it because it can measure everything.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on October 14, 2004
I've gone through 2 of these. Each time, a crack develops - straight down one side and up the other. I have not been rough with them. In fact, the last one broke when I was washing it with a soft cloth. Functionally, it's a great idea - smaller quantities are measured with greater accuracy. But, I'm not buying more until it is made from sturdier material.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
As a former chemist, among other things, I really appreciate this measuring cup as the very best improvement over the old pyrex glass cups. The shape is ideal for doing fine measurements down to around three or four tablespoons; however, I suggest you stop there, especially for oils, as you are likely to leave five to 10 percent of the measured liquid behind.

If I were to make any suggestions at all on the design of this 'beaker', it would be to release it in a glass version. I know this would be much more breakable, but I think it would also be much more sanitary, as I would feel much more confident that it would not get scratched and that it would stand up to a high heat wash.

For those who use it so much that you are tempted to use it for solids, I say don't. There are really good reasons to do solids with the stainless steel spoons and cups.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 2010
This is the second one of these that I've purchased. They are great measuring devices, but they don't wear well. I only hand wash these beakers in tepid water (never, ever in the dishwasher!), and this latest beaker still developed cracks within the first two weeks of usage. These cracks don't leak, but they are concerning.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on September 5, 2006
I bought two of these and they both met the same fate: a small crack in the bottom that rendered them useless. At this price I expected a little more. They didn't last more than a few months.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Here's a wonderful little tool for the cook: a beaker with half a dozen different measuring scales so that you can easily prepare any recipe, measure out odd volumes such as one cup plus one teaspoon (frankly I hate recipes which require that much precision, but hey, at least I have an easy way to make them now!) and even measure out ingredients in advance, cover and set them aside to use later.
The Emsa Perfect Beaker is perfect in all ways but one: It's light plastic and it gets scuffed up quite easily. Plastic also seems to hang on to fats and oils more tenaciously than does glass or metal, so that clean up is a bit harder. Still, it's light, easy to use and doesn't take up much space in the cabinet. I can live with a few scuffs and a little extra dishwashing liquid for clean-up. Try it; you'll love it.
[Edited to add: I have to concur with the reviewer who wished this beaker was made from Pyrex. Though it would be substantially heavier, I might still have it. Scuffed and weakened by constant use, it finally cracked when I used it to measure hot (not boiling) water. I will get another, but because I'll have to be more cautious with it, I'm not as wholly sold on it as I once was. No points taken away, though; it's still a great idea.]

ETA: I'm still happy with these measuring beakers more than fourteen years on. I'm on my second and I've lost the lid, and the beaker itself is scuffed and sad-looking from a lot of trips through the dish washer in my new place, but it's held together through cold and hot, through solid, liquid, and sticky gunk, and even a couple of fumble-fingered tumbles to the floor. This one has managed to withstand even near-boiling water (Yes, I'm stubborn about some things.) without cracking. It still tells me exactly what I want to know, and is my go-to measuring cup. Not even my set of Pyrex cups come close to being as useful to me. I really recommend this beaker to anyone who spends a lot of time in the kitchen.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon October 3, 2005
This is a great tool for measuring liquid ingredients. Since I do a lot of cooking and baking I find myself using it a lot. I am able to pour boiling hot water into it without any problems. It is best to not use it to measure oils since you tend to leave some behind. Also I find the lid that comes with it to be pretty much pointless. I just leave it sitting in a drawer and have not used it once since I purchased the beaker. My major problem with this is that over the years cracks have begun to develop along the bottom and sides of my container. It hasn't caused any leaks but I am sure I will need to buy a new one eventually. Until then it still serves it purpose well. But I do agree with a past reviewer that it would be great if they made one of these out of glass. Perhaps Pyrex could get involved.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.
See all 2 answered questions

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.