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Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions Hardcover – March 8, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 211 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio Hardcover; 1 edition (March 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591843790
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591843795
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (305 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #51,831 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews


Apple's former chief evangelist leads businessfolk down the path to enchantment.

The entrepreneur's entrepreneur is back with his 10th book, this time tackling the tricky art of influence and persuasion. Kawasaki (Reality Check: The Irreverent Guide to Outsmarting, Outmanaging and Outmarketing Your Competition, 2011, etc.) transforms the otherwise exhausted and overwrought tropes of how to win friends and influence people with a complete makeover here, whether he's talking about wardrobe choice or tips for effective swearing.

The author, a modern-day Dale Carnegie, offers explanations on how to wield the most influence in the digital age: Push Technologies like presentations, e-mails and Twitter are discussed as active means of enchanting others, while Pull Technologies like Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn passively draw them in. The author's suggestions for achieving likeability and trustworthiness, as well as overcoming resistance, are thoroughly explained and can easily translate from the workplace to the real world.

Kawasaki makes good use of subheads and bullet points, rendering information in a searchable format. He ends each chapter with an anecdote that illuminates the effectiveness of his techniques—while it's not original, it's effective. The author's trademark light and airy style is on display, but it's his humor and empathy that makes the heavy use of BusinessSpeak and buzzwords more easily palatable.

Informative, concise guide from one of America's most influential and, yes, enchanting entrepreneurs.

Review

"Read this book to create a company as enchanting as Apple."
-Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple

"Guy's book captures the importance - and the art - of believing in an idea that delivers something entirely unique to the customer. The power of a really good idea to transform the marketplace and individual customer experiences is huge, and this book offers a wealth of insights to help businesses and entrepreneurs tap into that potential."
-Sir Richard Branson, Founder of the Virgin Group

"Kawasaki provides insights so valuable we all wish we'd had them first."
-Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence: Science and Practice

"The best overall treatise on interpersonal relationships since Dale Carnegie wrote How to Win Friends and Influence People."
-Michael Gartenberg, research director, Gartner

"Guy has written the small-business manifesto. There is nothing more important for entrepreneurs than to enchant their customers, and Guy explains exactly how to do this."
-Jane Applegate, small-business management expert and author of 201 Great Ideas for Your Small Business

"Guy teaches you how to pull gems from people's hearts and minds and how to become an effective practitioner of life's crucial domains. Clearly, I taught him well."
-Dr. Phil Zimbardo, professor emeritus of psychology, Stanford University

"You feel it when you drive a BMW, touch an Apple iPad, shop in a Sephora store, or buy shoes from Zappos. Kawasaki reveals how you can deliver the same enchanting experiences as these famous brands."
-Robert Scoble, Rackspace videoblogger

More About the Author

Guy Kawasaki is the author of twelve books. He was the chief evangelist of Apple. He has a BA from Stanford University, an MBA from UCLA, and an honorary doctorate from Babson College.

His latest book is APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur--How to Publish a Book. Kirkus, the toughest reviewer in the business, said this about APE, "Essential reading (and reference) for modern authors, regardless of experience."

Kawasaki was born and raised in Hawaii. He currently lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with Wife 1.0, four kids, one dog, two chickens, three lizards, and two turtles.

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Customer Reviews

Concepts are presented clearly and the book is studded with examples and stories.
Susan R. Meyer
I could be wrong, but this is the type of book you will want to keep around and consult from time to time, just to make sure you're doing things right.
Olivier Blanchard
Enchantment, the Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions is Guy Kawasaki's tenth book.
Taly Weiss

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

244 of 259 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Armstrong on March 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Marketing and leadership books are strange animals. Some are great and others make you want to stab yourself in the eye with a fork. Almost all, though, usually fall into one of two categories:

1. How to develop a large and successful business; and
2. Why all marketers are liars

Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki is neither of these; instead, it's a book about one thing:

Influence.

"How can I influence others without moral compromise?" is the question at the heart of Enchantment. And it's an important one. There are a number of easy cheats to convince people to follow your leadership (carrots and sticks) or to buy your product or join your cause (incentives), but eventually those things always fail.

Why? Because they're disingenuous. They don't tap into people's passions. They don't move the heart.

And without that happening, whatever impact you have is fleeting at best.

The "pillars of enchantment" Kawasaki puts forward ones you'd be hard pressed to disagree with:

1. Be likeable
2. Be trustworthy
3. Have a great cause

In other words, be someone you'd actually want to spend time with and offer something that matters. These seem like concepts that should be met with a resounding, "well, I should hope so." I mean, this seems to be common sense, doesn't it? That's thing about common sense, though. To paraphrase G.K. Chesterton, it's not that common sense has been tried and found lacking, it's that it's been found difficult and left untried.

Unless you're likeable, it's extremely difficult to be found trustworthy. And unless you're trustworthy, no one will rally around your cause, no matter how good it is.
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173 of 198 people found the following review helpful By Chris Reich on March 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you read a lot of books you eventually run into the same material fairly often. That's the case for me with "Enchantment". While I generally admire Guy's work, I was not enchanted with this book.

It is extremely basic stuff. Smile, firm handshake, don't dress like a slob---enchanting? Steve McQueen and his wife are returning to LA from Las Vegas by car and she needs to relieve herself. There's a line at the gas station restroom so she tells the gals in line that there's a movie star out front---the crowd runs to see the stars and she takes a leak. That's an example of creating a win-win situation. Well, next time I need to pee I hope there is a celebrity I can use nearby.

I'm not going to bother recapping the story about the TV producer who repeats that she just liked Howard Stern about a zillion times. (Puke)

Frankly, by mid way I had to resolve reading this book on an empty stomach. I find celeb stories dull and somewhat grating. Hell yes, if you're Bill Gates you'll be enchanting no matter what the hell you do. BTW, swearing is encouraged but must be used properly. (Bill Gates is my example)

Unless you can see the turnip truck that just dropped you off pulling away, skip this one.

Chris Reich
(2 stars because the design is very good though the content is "see Flip run" basic.)
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160 of 198 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I am one of the many random people worldwide that received a complimentary copy of the book. And much as I feel grateful for the gift, I'll be honest. The book did not enchant. It's mostly a collection of tips that I've come across from various sources before this. What did not help was that the author re-wrote those tips in his own writing style (which is far from enchanting...actually it is tiresome!) It seems the author is more an entrepreneur than an original thinker or writer.

p.s. Btw, I got a link to a quiz on the author's FB page that offered to tell me how enchanting I was based on my responses. After filling out some 25 questions I clicked the Submit button to see my results and got a message that asked me to 'LIKE' the author's page BEFORE I could see my results. I was not enchanted. :(

p.p.s When I last checked, the quiz had been tweaked. You can now participate only AFTER you LIKE the page. Looks like the author still doesn't get it.
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44 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Prabhakar S. Kotla on May 1, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Lately both Guy Kawasaki and Seth Godin has been writing books for the sake of writing. I have due respect for both of them but there is nothing new in this book, rather its boring and waste of valuable time. There are no hard and fast rules to build great companies, Google followed its own philosophy to build a great search engine and likewise Apple followed its own philosophy to build great products. Its a good thing to reason what steve jobs will do /what Bill gates will do but there is no guarantee that they both will succeed at it .

Same old stories and same old garbage. Save your money
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Laura Wilker on April 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
At the end of Guy's book "enchantment" he fesses up to ripping off a lot of stuff from another guy's book.

Guy's book borrows heavily from a book that I read years ago and which is a much better resource for understanding "enchantment"
Get Robert Cialdini's book here instead, it's much more authentic and way deeper in examples.

Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (Collins Business Essentials)

Cialdini's book is the real deal while Guy's book is just another Guy book without an original thought. Guy even touts his company alltopp again in this book, same as he did in his last book.

Guy is a good marketer of Guy but not much more than that
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