Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $21.97
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0080453330 ISBN-10: 0080453333 Edition: 1st

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$1,540.56 $415.94

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Up to 50% Off Materials & Chemistry Books
For a limited time, enjoy special savings on materials and chemistry titles from Springer. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 2672 pages
  • Publisher: Academic Press; 1 edition (September 27, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0080453333
  • ISBN-13: 978-0080453330
  • Product Dimensions: 11.8 x 9.1 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 18.1 pounds
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,590,629 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This beautifully put together three-volume encyclopedia comprises 300-plus entries on a diverse range of topics in the contemporary study of animal behavior. Entries run the gamut from topic-focused (e.g., "Aggression and Territoriality," "Visual Signals") to those treating the behavior of a particular species or taxonomic group (e.g., "Bowerbirds," "Zebrafish"). The set also covers applied research, methodological issues, and historical topics, along with emerging areas of research such as animal welfare and the role of behavior in conservation. Most entries are five to eight pages long, and each concludes with a helpful list of recommendations for further reading and, in some cases, relevant Web sites. Breed and Moore have assembled an outstanding array of contributors, including many recognized experts in the field. The writing is crisp, clear, and to the point. Numerous tables and color figures add to the value of the text, and a lengthy glossary is included at the end of ! each volume. Although the sheer range of entries and the overlap among them could be a bit confusing, a "Subject Classification Index" located at the front of each volume organizes relevant entries under major subject headings. The editors state that their primary audience is advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and professionals looking for an overview of topics in animal behavior, and they have succeeded wonderfully in producing an indispensable reference work for this audience. Those who study animal behavior or teach in this field will want these volumes on their shelf. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-level undergraduates through researchers/faculty. -- S. C. Baker, James Madison University, CHOICE

Winner of the PROSE Award! The Association of American Publishers award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence/Multivolume Reference/Science

"The study of animal behavior is fascinating for many reasons, not the least of which is the light it may shine on human action. Here editors Breed (Univ. of Colorado) and Moore (Colorado State Univ.) present more than 300 articles on aspects of animal behavior, the work of 400 contributors from around the world. Each signed article begins with an introduction, then addresses the topic in several pages of detail, including supporting figures. Each article ends with a list of books, journal articles, and websites for further reading, some as recent as 2009. Articles may be based on a broad topic ("bird migration"), a more specific topic ("mating interference due to introduction of exotic species"), a specific animal ("spotted hyenas"), or a person ("Niko Tinbergen"). As articles are arranged alphabetically, the astute reader will consult the subject classification index to find all relevant articles. There are, for example, 29 articles classified under Landmark Studies, and five under Networks-Social. Cross-references and a general index are also provided, as well as a glossary. Breed and Moore contributed to Greenwood Press's 2004 work by the same name, edited by Marc Bekoff (also Univ. of Colorado). Bekoff called that earlier work unrivaled at the time. Consider the current title a worthy successor, geared perhaps toward a slightly older, more educated reader. BOTTOM LINE Highly recommended for academic and public libraries, including those holding the earlier work of the same title." -Teresa R. Faust, Vermont Dept. of Libs., Berlin in LIBRARY JOURNAL

"Every year, Choice subject editors single out for recognition the most significant print and electronic works reviewed in Choice during the previous calendar year. Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior appearing annually in Choice's January issue, this prestigious list of publications reflects the best in scholarly titles and attracts extraordinary attention from the academic library community. The 2011 feature includes 629 titles in 54 disciplines and subsections."--CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title, 2011

About the Author

After receiving my PhD from the University of Kansas in 1977, I came to Colorado to work as a faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where I have been ever since. I am currently a Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and I teach courses in general biology, animal behavior, insect biology, and tropical biology. My research program focuses on the behavior and ecology of social insects, and I have worked on ants, bees, and wasps. I have studied the nestmate recognition, the genetics of colony defense, the behavior of defensive bees, and communication during colony defense. I was Executive Editor of Animal Behaviour from 2006-2009.

As an undergraduate, I was inspired by parasitologist Clark P. Read to think about the ecology and evolution of parasites in new ways. I was especially excited to learn that parasites affected animal behavior, another favorite subject area. Most biologists outside the world of parasitology were not interested in parasites; they were relegated to a nether world someplace between the biology of free-living organisms and medicine. After peregrination through more than one graduate program, I completed my PhD studying parasites and behavior at the University of New Mexico. I did postdoctoral work on parasite community ecology with Dan Simberloff at Florida State University, and then accepted a faculty position at Colorado State University, where I have remained since 1983. I am currently a Professor in the Department of Biology where I teach courses in invertebrate zoology, animal behavior, and history of medicine. I study a variety of aspects of parasite ecology and host behavior ranging from behavioral fever and transmission behavior to the ecology of introduced parasite species.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers
ARRAY(0x9d5042f4)