Qty:1
  • List Price: $40.00
  • Save: $11.25 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Encyclopedia of Herbal Me... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ex-library book,
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $8.76
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 8 images

Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine: The Definitive Home Reference Guide to 550 Key Herbs with all their Uses as Remedies for Common Ailments Hardcover – December 1, 2000


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$28.75
$25.85 $20.00

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of January
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Frequently Bought Together

Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine: The Definitive Home Reference Guide to 550 Key Herbs with all their Uses as Remedies for Common Ailments + Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use + Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health: 175 Teas, Tonics, Oils, Salves, Tinctures, and Other Natural Remedies for the Entire Family
Price for all three: $49.24

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Dk Natural Health
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: DK Adult; 2nd revised edition (December 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789467836
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789467836
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 1.1 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (134 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,484 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This is the second edition of Chevallier's The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants (LJ 12/96). Although the title has changed, the format and contents are substantially the same. Careful comparison of the two editions, though, reveals that the text of the second edition has been revised to reflect the latest herbal research and includes some herbs not mentioned in the earlier book, such as cat's claw. The new edition also addresses the issues of quality control and the safe use of herbal remedies. But as with the original, initial and final chapters address the development of herbal medicine, world herbal traditions, and home remedies. Sandwiched between this material is an alphabetical listing by Latin name of 550 of the most commonly used individual herbs. One hundred key plants are given a full-page spread outlining their habitat and cultivation, related species, key constituents and actions, research, traditional and current uses, parts used, key preparations, and self-help uses. In a separate alphabetical list, an additional 450 plants are covered in less detail. A fine bibliography and index complete the book. As with all DK publications, the encyclopedia is lavishly illustrated with high-quality color captioned photographs and focus boxes. Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs (1998) is a similar title directed to a different audience. Although the Rodale book addresses briefly the medicinal uses of the listed herbs, there is a much stronger emphasis on the horticultural and culinary aspects. Deni Bown's Encyclopedia of Herbs and Their Uses (1995) is more comprehensive, covering over 1000 herbs, but has less information regarding their medicinal use. Therefore, the new Chevallier volume remains a top choice for a library reference on the medicinal use of herbs for the public, although North American practitioners will find it lacking in the coverage of regional herbs. Recommended for both public and academic libraries. Mary Stout, Pima Community Coll., Tucson, AR
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Andrew Chevallier, FNIMH, is an experienced medical herbalist and Senior Lecturer in Herbal Medicine at Middlesex University. He runs a busy private practice in London and is involved in clinical and laboratory research in herbal medicine. He is a past president of the National Institute of Medicinal Herbalists, and author of several other books on herbal medicine, including Hypericum: The Natural Antidepressant and More and Flaxseed.

Customer Reviews

It is entertaining, easy to understand, and very informative.
Michael C. Hines
Plant descriptions and colorful detailed photographs make learning about some popular herbs and their medicinal properties quick, easy and fun.
Homecare
I highly recommend this book to anyone using medicinal herbs: just starting out or experienced!
Tracey Doore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Michelle on November 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I have used herbal medications exclusively for about 10 years now, and I depend on this book as my herb "bible." It is always smart to double-check medicinal advice from several sources, but I have never found this book to be wrong or lacking in pertinent information. It is very well arranged, and information is cross-referenced which adds to the ease of use.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
127 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Dianne Foster HALL OF FAME on December 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
With the wide selection of books on herbal uses confronting the average herbalist or curious reader, how is one to choose which resource is best? The answer is that it is impossible to use only one resource. Chevallier's books come close to being the one resource to use for employing herbs for medicinal purposes, but because the misuse of herbs can be deadly, I rely on a variety of material and crossreference my applications. In other words, if anyone says an herb has proved poisonous, I am careful. ....
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF HERBAL MEDICINE (EHM) by Andrew Chevallier is an update of his book THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MEDICINAL PLANTS (EMP). EHM covers most of the same plants as EMP, but contains more up-to-date information from various sources conducting research on the properties and uses of herbs, including herbal systems in other parts of the world such as the U.K. and Germany, (i.e. not exclusively reliant on the actions of the FDA or USDA for all it's information).
EHM, as did EMP before it, includes one of the largest selections of plants for medicinal uses. Not all the plants are botonacally speaking "herbs." Black Cherry, for example, is a tree, but like many other trees has constituent parts that may be used for medicinal purposes, and therefore viewed as an "herbal" remedy for certain conditions (chronic dry, irritable coughs!!)--or kill you if you ingest an excess. ....
EHM is not much concerned with the manufacture of floral sachets or assembly of ingredients for pot pourri, or how to lay out your herbal garden for that matter. In fact, my suspician is that the average EHM reader will probably consult the health food store for herbal items, and not grow herbs in the back yard or try to harvest them in the nearest park. ....
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
111 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Michael C. Hines on August 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Book Report:

The Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine by Andrew Chevallier, FNIMH

Publisher: Dorling Kindersley, Limited

I first decided to buy the book in hopes that it would be a good, up to the minute, desk reference on Medicinal Herbs. It turned out to be a little more of a text book to study by and what some book publishers call a coffee table book. A coffee table book is a book as large as a magazine, hardbound and full of color pictures, which would be entertaining even to people not interested in the subject yet. It is a good study help because of the sections in the back on how to use and administer herbs.

The first section tells about how medicinal herbs work by affecting different systems of the body with a number of chemicals working together to effect change. The book does divide the body's system up a little differently than the Heart of Herbs Course, Making it a little confusing for those of us trying to study both texts at the same time. The authors system is:

The Skin, using herbs that are Antiseptic, Astringent and depurative.

Immune System, using herbs that are Immune stimulants

Respiratory System, using herbs that are Antiseptic, antibiotic, Expectorant,

Demulcent, and spasmolytics

Endocrine Glands using herbs that are adaptogens, hormonally active, and

Emmenagogues

Urinary System, using herbs that are antiseptic, astringent and diuretic.

Musculoskeletal System using herbs that are analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, and

Antispasmotic.

Nervous System using herbs that are nerviness, relaxants, stimulants and tonics.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
111 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Lily on May 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book looking for a complete reference book for herbals for my family. I have two young boys, and it has been very challenging finding at home remedies for them when they have been sick. I don't like making too many trips to the doctor's office if I don't have to, and I'm more of a hands off, let nature take it's course kinda gal. However, when the boys or my husband are sick, I like to have something on hand that's not the most potent OTC you can buy, or even the herbal mixes they sell at the health food stores unless I am certain that what's in there is going to do no harm, and actually help them. That being said, this book falls short of what I was looking for. The full color pages are nice, and there is quite a bit of information available on each herb represented. It is also nice that there is a special section on kids in the back which tells you what the proper dosage is for little ones. However, I am concerned to find very little information on contraindications or cautions, for instance, herbs you should never take if you are pregnant are not noted except in a small section in the back. Kind of an awkward way to read the book. Specifically, the herb Lobelia has no mention of the fact that many herbalists don't use it because large doses can be fatal...might be good to know, eh? The organization is weird for the lay person (by scientific name), and there are some commonly found herbs in herbal remedies I have bought before that are not listed in the book. Overall, maybe good to have on hand, but not the one reference book you must have.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.