Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence Hardcover – May 1, 1995


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, May 1, 1995
$34.03 $0.47

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Facts on File (May 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816027587
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816027583
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,563,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA?Where did the Black Death originate? How many kinds of plague are there? How widespread was polio? What is Legionnaire's Disease? This factual, yet fascinating, volume answers these questions and many more in a clear, readable form. Although it is a reference book, it may be read as a history and geography of world diseases. There is plenty of information in each alphabetically arranged entry, and suggestions for further reading are included for more serious scholars. A book that will enrich science, social studies, English, and other classes, as well as inform general readers.?Margaret C. Hecklinger, Lee High School, Springfield, VA
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Edited by prolific reference author Kohn (Dictionary of Historic Documents, LJ 5/1/91), this unique encyclopedia provides brief entries on most of the significant epidemics throughout history. A typical entry is less than one page and covers basic facts such as time and location of the outbreak, number of stricken, and any historical significance of the epidemic. A few suggested readings follow each entry, and a comprehensive bibliography of classic and current epidemiological works is included. Additional special features include a time line and a listing of epidemics by geographical area. The biggest drawback to this source is its arrangement. While the book is adequately indexed, most entries are alphabetized according to location of outbreak (e.g., Legionnaires' Disease is located in the "P" section under "Philadelphia 'Legionnaires' Disease' Epidemic"), which makes some articles difficult to locate. But though brief, the articles are also informative, making this a useful ready-reference source for general readers.?Tina Neville, Univ. of South Florida at St. Petersburg Lib.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on January 21, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Some encyclopedias such as "The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers," "The Encyclopedia of Country Living," or "The Cat Fanciers' Association Cat Encyclopedia" are interesting and well-organized enough to be read straight through. The same cannot be said of "Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence," mainly because of the way its subjects are ordered. I would have been tempted to arrange the encyclopedia by disease, then historical occurrences within the disease category. Instead, the editor used a strictly alphabetical format that usually begins with the name of a country or city, e.g. "African Influenza Epidemic of 1890" is followed by "Albenga Meningitis Epidemic of 1815." There are also plagues listed under the names of emperors and saints, e.g. Antonine Plague, Plague of Cyprian, and Plague of Justinian.

Luckily, there are several appendices including a "Timetable of Plague and Pestilence" and a "Geographical Appendix." One of the more interesting entries in the latter appendix is "Ancient History"--not precisely a geographical entity but containing references to plagues such as the "Thasian Mumps Epidemic" (c. 410 B.C.), and the "Cough of Perinthus" (c. 410 B.C.).

This book was published in 1995, so it is slightly outdated as far as AIDS (the only entries are for Africa and the United States), and some of the hemorrhagic fever outbreaks, although the Zairian Ebola Epidemic of 1976 is thoroughly covered. The SARS virus, and the new potential mass killer, the H5N1 avian flu virus are not included, but articles can be found on the H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza outbreaks (if you know to look under headings such as "Russian (Red) Influenza Pandemic of 1977-78" for H1N1.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Rood on February 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be a most helpful resource for researching the history of communicable disease. The entries are pithy, but well referenced. The bibiliography in the back of the book is a goldmine of reference material. This is an excellent subject-specific encyclopedia with no axe to grind and little fluff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Severin Olson on June 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Above all an encyclopedia should be comprehensive. It is most disappointing to read one covering only material one already knows. This one does not disappoint. The author, (editor), has done his homework and given the reader a glimpse of how destructive infectious disease can be. From Canada to New Zealand; ancient times to the present; and Aids to Yellow Fever, we learn how mankind has had to cope with pestilence. Kohn even includes outbreaks of diseases I never knew existed (Miliary Fever?).

Although I like the A-Z format used here, I have to agree with the last reviewer that it can be a touch confusing. One doesn't always know if an epidemic should be looked up under the name of a city, locality or country. But this is a small flaw. Readers should also be aware that the book has been updated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Some encyclopedias such as "The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers," "The Encyclopedia of Country Living," or "The Cat Fanciers' Association Cat Encyclopedia" are interesting and well-organized enough to be read straight through. The same cannot be said of "Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence," mainly because of the way its subjects are ordered. I would have been tempted to arrange the encyclopedia by disease, then historical occurrences within the disease category. Instead, the editor used a strictly alphabetical format that usually begins with the name of a country or city, e.g. "African Influenza Epidemic of 1890" is followed by "Albenga Meningitis Epidemic of 1815." There are also plagues listed under the names of emperors and saints, e.g. Antonine Plague, Plague of Cyprian, and Plague of Justinian.

Luckily, there are several appendices including a "Timetable of Plague and Pestilence" and a "Geographical Appendix." One of the more interesting entries in the latter appendix is "Ancient History"--not precisely a geographical entity but containing references to plagues such as the "Thasian Mumps Epidemic" (c. 410 B.C.), and the "Cough of Perinthus" (c. 410 B.C.).

This book was first published in 1995, so it is slightly outdated as far as AIDS (the only entries are for Africa and the United States), and some of the hemorrhagic fever outbreaks, although the Zairian Ebola Epidemic of 1976 is thoroughly covered. The SARS virus, and the new potential mass killer, the H5N1 avian flu virus are not included, but articles can be found on the H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza outbreaks (if you know to look under headings such as "Russian (Red) Influenza Pandemic of 1977-78" for H1N1.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?