Engineering & Transportation
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $5.04 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Light wear on dust jacket/cover. Pages clean. Binding strong.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Endless Horizon: A Very Messy Motorcycle Journey Around the World Hardcover – February 15, 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$22.96
$7.93 $3.44
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Frequently Bought Together

Endless Horizon: A Very Messy Motorcycle Journey Around the World + Jupiters Travels: Four Years Around the World on a Triumph
Price for both: $42.09

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Motorbooks; First edition (February 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760336040
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760336045
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 7 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #594,733 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Walsh's writing style is uniquely entertaining and he wastes no time sucking you in. The entire journey is a roller coaster ride of improbable food fortune layered with streaks of the worst life has to offer. What really hooked me, though, was getting to experience the story through someone that is my polar opposite. Where I would take the practical and carefully chosen approach, Walsh charges ahead, guns blazing with the mindset of a man who has nothign to lose and everything to gain. This book screams that sometimes it's better to let life happen to you, than the other way around. Often, a little luck will carry you farther than a lot of planning. If you are searching for an inspiring and entertaining read this spring then GET THIS BOOK! - Review by Daniel Vickers of www.adventuremotorcycleblog.net



This is the third 'round the world on a motorbike' I have read. By far the most entertaining and thought provoking of the lot. It does help to know a little British slang! Walsh in his own manner is right up there with Wm. Faulkner. Give us more. - Review from Ed in West Virginia

From the Inside Flap

“Riding a bike removes the need for clutter, toys, rubbish that other men have to take on holiday.  If I want adrenaline, I’ll rush a giddy overtake, not rent a jet ski.”

 

The world through the eyes of Dan Walsh is never less than Technicolor, and always uninhibited, rebellious and on the edge.  Not since the days of Ted Simon’s Jupiter’s Travels has one man embarked on such a crazed bike trek around the world.

 

“For me, Chile will always be South America’s supermodel sister – very beautiful but too long, too skinny, and too expensive to ride, and despite the groovy exterior, unpleasantly right-wing underneath.”

 

Dan has traveled the length and breadth of the world; in Africa, on his XT Desert Rat; in America, on a BMW F65OGS Dakar.  Along the way he’s visited Buenos Aires, where “revolutionary” means the angry poor invading the presidential palace, not a really small phone that’s also a camera.  He’s been mistaken for a bum in New York, hammered by deadly tequila in Mexico, contracted typhoid in a dilapidated Bolivian hotel, visited the Most Beautiful Road in the World in Peru, and been kidnapped in Kenya.

 

“I get my bum pinched by a tranny, my pocket picked by a grafter and get a gun pulled on me by a one-eyed, one-armed midget who’s upset ‘cause I winked at him.  These are the days that must happen to you.”

 

Cynical but grudgingly hopeful and bitingly funny, Dan Walsh is the rightful heir to Ted Simon as the pre-eminent biker-rebel of our generation.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

If you want to meet Dan Walsh, you will here.
GS worship
If you're judgmental about the character of the writer you won't like this book.
Coop
I wished I had saved my money, but it is too late for me.
Frog4aday

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Escéptico on June 30, 2009
Format: Hardcover
When the US version of this book included the subtitle, A Very Messy Motorcycle Journal.... they were right.

The first few pages will tell you all you need to know about the writer's admitted lack of expertise and common sense. There is " ...burst-mattress XT600 dirt bike..." (see that license plate? the XT is by definition and manufacturer legal description not a dirt bike). Actually the book's marketing folks are not in the running for accuracy either, where they proclaim "Dan Walsh rode out of London on a Yamaha XT Desert Rat.." forgetting all the while to hire the fact-checker who might have told them that there is no such model, except in their imaginings.

And perhaps more revealingly, Walsh wonders aloud "... how fast you have to move to outrun stupidity." For those still wondering, Walsh did not even attempt to outrun stupidity. He merely distilled it and carried it, in industrial strength and volume, wherever he went. It's best to get these acknowledgments out in the open, and early on. Oh, yes, and remember that this book is a rehash of mostly previously published material. Though there is occasionally amusing and even creative writing, this book features a few too many repetitions of phrases that weren't particularly funny the first ten times, and attempts at some foreign phrases that are, well, he got the word order backwards.

Though Walsh's book is by no means in the same league as Chatwin's "In Patagonia," each has its own version of purely volitional messiness. Chatwin was a bit free and loose with certain of his facts, but nevertheless wrote a fine book that was well regarded even if the cognoscenti were well aware of his occasional tendency to invent. Of course, most readers take the factoids of In Patagonia as if they were true.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By wen313 on February 15, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you read Dan Walsh's "These Are The Days That Must Happen To You" you read this book. This is just the U.S. release re-titled "Endless Horizon" for some reason. I really wish Amazon had mentioned that someplace in the description. We got excited about the release of "Endless Horizon" thinking it was a second volume in a Walsh series (and that's why the cover art was the same). It is not a new book. It's the same book, different title. Now I have to go through the hassle of returning it.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Coop on January 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book, while not a literary masterpiece, was a fun read. Although his MO throughout the piece was constant (ride, drink, chase women, hangover, ride, repeat) if you read carefully you learn the book is more about the writer than the journey. The writing changes with his mentality, from exuberance to depression. If you're judgmental about the character of the writer you won't like this book. He's more of an anti-hero. Deeply flawed with his soul on his sleeve. He readily admits this and asks no forgiveness. I kinda like him.

Take it for what it is; a 'stream-of-consciousness' book about a guy and his war with himself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Webster on November 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love the way Walsh writes. He's no fan of America and writes to that effect. He is a moto brethren that put on paper many of the things that we long riders have run across while on the road and something we hope never to have to deal with. I enjoy him being real with vices and strengths and while he spends no time chest bumping over his strengths (they are evident) his knack of making fun of himself is too fun. Oh to live your life Mr. Walsh! Maybe someday!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Denis on March 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This a fine collection of writing. Yes it has been published before, but you threw those mags away and you need to go back to this again and again.

I find some fair points in some of the criticism here. I take exception as I'm sure Walsh does, when he is stupidly compared to T. Simon. Chalk and cheese, each excellent.

Not for the first time someone feels obliged to say Walsh is not a great fan of the US - so? I'd say it's US foreign policy he doesnt like and he's in a club of millions on that one, and you too. So dont take that personally. Simon Gandolfi, another m/cycle writer feels the same.

His writing is often top class - he is a writer of quality in the moto writing stable. His writing is often closer to poetry than prose and the cultural and literary allusions are everywhere - if you can pick them up.

His attitude to the bike is as someone said, appalling. Worse, he writes of waiting for someone else to fix it for him. He is lazy and useless here. But we're talking about his writing - don't make the mistake of assuming that a writer is all peace and love and wisdom; no more than you are. If you want a reference on this , think of the opening of "Zen and the Art" where Pirsig's companion has an attitude to machinery which Pirsig doesnt share. Walsh is that companion. Read "Zen"again and think about it - but dont tell me that the marvellous Pirsig is a motorcycle writer as one collection of writing claims. So we agree that Walsh is useless mechanically - but he's a fine writer! Just dont get him to repair your bike. He never said he was a mechanic.

Some of DWs behaviour is mental -"striping his arm in a bar" - and you ask yourself "would I travel with him? " No, I wouldnt and he wouldnt travel with me.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?