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Enemies of the People (2 Disc Special Edition)


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Enemies of the People (2 Disc Special Edition) + S21 The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine + Duch: Master of the Forges of Hell
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Product Description

Winner of the 2010 Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Prize.

One of the most harrowing and compelling personal documentaries of our time, ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE exposes for the first time the truth about the Killing Fields and the Khmer Rouge who were behind Cambodia s horrific genocide. More than simply an inquiry into Cambodia s experience, however, ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE is a profound meditation on the nature of good and evil, shedding light on the capacity of some people to do terrible things and for others to forgive them.

This riveting film takes audiences as close to witnessing evil as they are ever likely to get. It is also a personal journey into the heart of darkness by journalist/filmmaker Thet Sambath, whose family was wiped out in the Killing Fields, but whose patience and discipline elicits unprecedented on-camera confessions from perpetrators at all levels of the Khmer Rouge hierarchy including Nuon Chea aka Brother Number Two now on trial for genocide. This is investigative journalism of the highest order.

Special Features: over Six Hours of Extras

DISC 1
Nuon Chea Uncut: more confessions from Brother Number Two
30 minute mini-documentary: Anatomy of a Massacre
Audio commentary with Thet Sambath and Rob Lemkin
Khmer dubbed version
Subtitles in ten languages

DISC 2
Historic videoconference from Long Beach and Bangkok: Victims + Perpetrators = Survivors
Directors Q & As including David Puttnam producer of Oscar®-winning THE KILLING FIELDS
TV reports and Music Video by rapper praCh Ly

28 page booklet of essays with introduction by Elizabeth Becker

Review

Inspiring. A testament to one man's persistent search for the truth. Extraordinary on several fronts. --New York Times

One of the most important films ever made about Cambodia. Not only a historical document, but a work of art. --Wall Street Journal

One of the most amazing investigative documentaries of all time. --Monsters and Critics

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, Thet Sambath
  • Directors: Thet Sambath, Rob Lemkin
  • Format: Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Subtitles: English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, Thai
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Studio: Old Street Films
  • DVD Release Date: February 28, 2012
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00578K2H6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,897 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By K. E. on July 14, 2011
Format: DVD
This is a brilliant, thoughtful study of a massively terrible event which is overwhelming in its scope. Even now, the young people in Cambodia are forgetting about this time-partially because evidently some of the perpetrators are still in power. It is never solved, truly-the whys of this tragedy.
The narrator takes us though a journey with gentleness, graciousness-remarkable in the face of what he personally experienced. Highly recommend this dvd...just watch it.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By David Crumm on February 29, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Leaders around the world still are sorting out the aftermath of the vast crimes against humanity that swept through Cambodia in the 1970s. As recently as spring 2012, U.S. and Cambodian officials made front-page news by trying to reconcile the theft of a priceless Cambodian statue that apparently was stolen in the mid-1970s and wound up in a Sotheby's auction.

Even more important than sorting out reparations from cultural crimes in that era, the first of the Khmer Rouge war criminals was not convicted until 2010 and human-rights investigations continue in Cambodia to this day. Many investigators and journalists--like those you will meet in the historic video record in `Enemies of the People'--are still working to pierce the veil of secrecy about what happened during the bloody reign of Khmer Rouge terror. In that era, countless Cambodians who are alive today were brutally tortured--and 2 million Cambodians were murdered. (Some estimates place the death toll lower or higher.)

The fact that few perpetrators have been brought to justice is shocking. But, why should you care? Well, as a journalist myself, I've got a longtime commitment to spreading information that aids in global peacemaking. The release of collected video from the extensive `Enemies' filmmaking project, within this new DVD set, is exactly the kind of peacemaking effort we all can encourage.

When a version of the documentary aired in 2011 on PBS, I had a chance to interview the brave Cambodian journalist Thet Sambath. For years, he risked his life to find and interview Khmer Rouge killers. His body of work paved the way for the creation of this full-scale documentary film along with Rob Lemkin.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By BluntReview on November 16, 2011
Format: DVD
The Khmer Rouge's reign in Cambodia, has a notorious notch in history's timeline. But, unlike, say Nazi Germany, it is not as studied; the psychology of how neighbor turns against neighbor. This outrageous few years is not the stuff of museums and American history classes. Many do not even know what happened. Those who do still ask why.

Approximately one quarter of the population lost their lives; one quarter - that is not a misprint. Men, women and children. The Khmer Rouge regime murdered over a neighboring country's political movements, (Vietnam), and the paranoia that grew within two of Cambodia's leaders that "infiltrators" would take down their new communist regime.

After executing any high-level officials the two felt may be party resisters they took aim at farmers and workers. Villagers considered traitors (without trial or proof) were put to death.

Thet Sambath, who lost his father, mother and brother to the Khmer Rouge has become a journalist. And most recently, leaving behind his family, and safety, he has been working for years to gain the trust of a few still-living players in the "Killing Fields," and the actual Second in Command's trust. Your stomach churns as Sambath smiles and documents confessions of their crimes in the late 1970s.

Though it has been decades since the killings there is still a country-wide silence about who did what and why. Sambath (along with co-director Rob Lemkin), weave through the agonizing footage of kindly-looking old men and women who once slaughtered their neighbors.

I can not think of any other mass-murder-in-history documentary that has captured (on film) the confessions of those directly involved. Some regretful, some filled with shame...
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Van Tijen on November 24, 2011
Format: DVD
We saw this movie early November 2011 in Phnom Penh during an archival study visit to Cambodia. Its focus differs from what many movies on the "Cambodia Genocide" tend to do, a peaceful people and the sudden appearance of some communist monsters destroying the fairy tale life in Cambodia. The focus is on the handwork of the killing, outside the now over-documented Tuol Sleng interrogation centre in Phnom Penh and the dark tourism park of The Killing Fields half an hour drive from the Cambodian capital. Unless the over-eager fast camera crews and filmmakers from the West that hastily try to cover the Cambodian drama in a few weeks, the Cambodian author of the movie spent ten years of effort in interviewing many people involved in the primitive killing machine, whereby the movie is just showing a few of the cases he has been able to document, explaining his almost casual way of engaging perpetrators into some sort of dialogue. This focus on the lower strata of killers is most important in a situation whereby the Cambodia International tribunal prosecutes the top layer of command only. The movie brings out that the over-repeated argument 'if I did not kill I would have been killed myself' is not the end of the story. A man interviewed and after several sessions confessing to some killings done, tries to minimise his involvement, he says he only killed a few. Another villager later comments on his statement telling that it had been many. Thet Sambath in one scene brings a villager to show how he did the actual killing offering himself for the reconstructive demonstration of throat slitting done with the same knife used to kill chickens.Read more ›
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Enemies of the People (2 Disc Special Edition)
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