Customer Reviews


86 Reviews
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (28)
3 star:
 (13)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing album, lousy sound quality
Argggh!
There's nothing more frustrating than trying to enjoy high quality music through a fog of bad production. On this release the mighty Nevermore steer to the heavier side with mixed results. The songs are heavy and brutal, almost a death metal vibe going on but not quite. It reminds me of what Testament did with The Gathering. Ultra-brutal metal made better by...
Published on August 5, 2003

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars GREAT Disc, BAD sound!!!
OK, this is possibly Nevermore's greatest disc to date. It is short, around 40 minutes with no filler. Someone set Jeff Loomis loose in the guitar room and he went completley nuts. Furious riffs and the sterling vocals of Warrel Dane make this one of the best CD's of the year.
The problem is the mix, this is supposed to be the last album they do with Century Media...
Published on August 14, 2003 by Timothy W. Long


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing album, lousy sound quality, August 5, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
Argggh!
There's nothing more frustrating than trying to enjoy high quality music through a fog of bad production. On this release the mighty Nevermore steer to the heavier side with mixed results. The songs are heavy and brutal, almost a death metal vibe going on but not quite. It reminds me of what Testament did with The Gathering. Ultra-brutal metal made better by having real vocals where the cookie monster usually does his burping. The opening track is fantastic. I do miss some of the more melodic side of things I admit, The Heart Collector being one of my favourites, but it's still a great CD and a neat change of pace from the last 2 albums. The real problem is the production, which is in a word, awful. Not "St. Anger" awful, but not a whole lot better. It's so hard to believe an international major release could get out the door sounding this amateurly recorded and mixed. It's not only muddy as previous reviewers have stated, but there is absoultely NO bottom end on the kick drums....none. I have a 15 sub-woofer in my car, but you'd never know it was there. When I first popped this disc in and cranked it up, I literally thought my sub had stopped working. All of the kicks, and I do mean ALL come tapping out of my door speakers. It also has that same weird, flat boxy sound that Halford's otherwise excellent "Crucible" suffered with, thin and flat almost like a highly compressed vinyl record. Isn't anyone awake at these record labels anymore? Anyway, a great piece of butt kicking from Nevermore, that you will unfortunately only partly hear. Still worthy of 4 stars for the great music.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Re-Mixed Enemies of Reality, July 15, 2005
By 
J. Wooldridge (Colorado Springs, CO USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
Starting out with only $20,000 to record and produce the original Enemies of Reality, with unexperienced producer, Kelly Gray, Nevermore created a work that was undeniably good, but was also undeniably horribly produced.

Now with Andy Sneaps' take on remixing it, it is like said before, a difference of day and night. This remixed album kicks unbelievable amounts of ass. From the opening Anthem track, Enemies of reality, to the bitter and cold beauty poured from Noumenon, this is definitally a fantastic album.

For anyone that heard the original album, but not this remix, I strongly advise listening to the remix. The difference is incredible.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, definitively better than the original., August 31, 2005
By 
I. MUNOZ (Montreal, PQ, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
I own the original version, and in this new one the vocals are certainly brought upfront, everything is better defined, drums and bass sound far tighter, and the mix is way cleaner. However, the rhythm guitar's tone does suffer a bit. The ballsy mood, the deep dark tone that Kelly Gray succeeded in reflecting on the original version is somewhat lost here -- though just slightly, to be fair. But definitively, this remastered and remixed release is much more brilliant. The band shines as it should have in the first try; and the final product is unarguably better rounded. Given that the music in this album is pure metal genius, I have to give to this "corrected" version its well deserved five stars. Adding the fact that they included three videos in the enhanced section, one of them with the band performing "Enemies of reality" live, you bet you won't be disappointed -- this fairly compensates for the short duration of this album. In few words, consider giving to the original album a second try by purchasing this one, and you won't regret it. As this review's title points out: yes, definitively better than the original.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars GREAT Disc, BAD sound!!!, August 14, 2003
By 
Timothy W. Long (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
OK, this is possibly Nevermore's greatest disc to date. It is short, around 40 minutes with no filler. Someone set Jeff Loomis loose in the guitar room and he went completley nuts. Furious riffs and the sterling vocals of Warrel Dane make this one of the best CD's of the year.
The problem is the mix, this is supposed to be the last album they do with Century Media so maybe this has something to do with it ... how else do you explain a CD that sounds like it was recorded live through a funnel? then filtered through a water pipe so that all highs and lows are removed leaving a muddled sound that consists of pure mid-range rubish. It crackles on high end speakers and makes me wish for some nice finger nails on a chalk board to screech, thus distracting me from the horror I am hearing
Kelly Grey produced the disc, if he is responsible for the sound then someone needs to tear off his arm and beat him about the head and shoulders with it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Metal Masterpiece, July 31, 2003
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
Almost three years after their landmark album, Dead Heart In A Dead World, Nevermore deliver another metal masterpiece with Enemies of Reality. This is like Politics of Ecstasy in the sense that there is not one bad song on here. It mixes the technicality of Politics with the sheer agression of Dead Heart. If you're a guitarist, you will enjoy this cd; Jeff Loomis goes completely apecrap with his soloing. We all knew he was an amazing guitarist, but this just blows his other works out of the water. Warrel Dane, once again, shows that he is one of the most talented vocalists in metal today. His lyrics are as angry and bitter as ever. The rhythm section of Jim Shepperd on bass and Van Williams on drums pummels like a freight train. The song "enemies of reality" kicks the album off in high gear and does not stop. "Ambivalent" has probably my favorite solo. "I, Voyager" and "Create the Infinite" are probably my favorite songs. "Tomorrow Turned Into Yesterday" can be considered the ballad of the album. "Noumenon" is a strange song that segues into the cataclysmic "Seed Awakening" with the powerful message, "There is no stronger drug than reality". Nevermore have, once again, proven they are metal gods.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "There is no Stronger Drug than Reality", December 9, 2008
By 
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
Before reviewing the music on this disc, a couple of housekeeping items are necessary.

First, this album was released in 2003 with mastering that nearly everyone found bad. In 2005, it was remastered, and re-released. Whatever the merits of either disc, the reason to bring this up here is so you know there are two versions.

Second, there are four versions of this disc listed at Amazon, and their editorial descriptions seem more confusing than helpful. This particular version claims to be an import, apparently has no bonus tracks or additional discs, and should be the re-mixed version, since it was issued in 2005. However, the only way to purchase it seems to be from third-party sellers, two of whom are not selling it at what should be an import price.

So, with that said:

"Enemies of Reality" is typically thought of as Nevermore's "pure thrash" album--all killer, no filler, and clocking in at barely over 40 minutes. And while it is true that it is short and does have some of the fastest shredding by Nevermore, it really is more than merely a thrash album. Also, this tends to be hardcore fan's least favorite Nevermore album, because of how "narrowly" it focuses on its project here. This is not a criticism, of course, but if you are looking forward to "Dead Heart in a Dead World II" or "Dreaming Neon Black Again," then you may be setting yourself up not to like this disc.

"Enemies of Reality," at 5'11", opens with a slow, chaotic sounding fade in, but once it arrives, throws down the gauntlet immediately, launching into frantic riff that almost immediately gives way to a rolling triplet kind of guitar line that will be a staple of this disc. (There are short solos and moments of crushing bridge work all over this disc, such as 1'26" here). The chorus, however, is broad, melodic and not the pure thrash one might expect from this album's reputation. When the main riff returns, with its aggression amped up at 2'20", Dane's lyrics are appropriately even more unhinged. At 3'08" comes the album's first solo (complete, as always with a new, grind-tripleted riff to accompany it). Loomis wastes no time and provides an earful of what he can do. That proves to be the "soulful" solo, however. The music jumps over to agonized howling by Dane, and then gets out of the way of the "fast" solo starts, with the drummer seemingly matching Loomis' blazing notes on double bass. The line is a jagged, ultra-fast descending thing, that Loomis then doubles--and not only is it a clear tour de force, it also sounds cool.

"Ambivalent," at 4'12", starts with ripping descending guitar lines, then plays with start/stop lines and a band-harmonized coda before returning to pure pummeling. The solo is in three parts here: a racing linear line over the main riff, which then becomes (the riff does) pounded chords with gaps. It's a great, unexpected transition and the solo rails over the top of it, just slightly Eastern and convincingly grand. The music returns to the opening again, but the solo doesn't stop and goes on over relentlessly pummeling drums and blistering rhythm guitar.

"Never Purify," at 4'03", seems to drop into the middle of a song already underway, with an almost hymn-like chorus, that gives way to an alternating heavy, linear/bent guitar line and crazed arpeggios. The solo (introduced by a bridge with too many ideas to describe) sets up another racing solo with some of the longest arpeggios I have ever heard (longest meaning from low to high notes). The formula here is one Loomis will display on his solo album extensively as well (introducing numerous ideas, and then recombining them in various ways), it's just that the ideas come so fast and frequently that there's never time to settle in or become bored.

"Tomorrow Turned into Yesterday," at 4'35", slows things down considerably, and is about as close to a ballad as this disc manages (save for "Who Decides"), with Dane down in his Layne Staley range. The band hangs out in this mood surprisingly long, until at 2'52" a new, nastier riff is introduced for the guitar solo, which continues over a vocal-less verse. This is definitely not one of the better songs on the disc, even with the wicked final (new) riff that ends it.

"I, Voyager," at 5'48", drops immediately into a classic warp-speed thrash, but then as the vocals come in, somehow there's a change that makes the whole thing become almost epic in scope (bass, guitar, and drums all conspire as Dane's harmonized vocals float above). A pre-chorus sets up another melodic chorus, then slides back off to the gorgeous monstrousness of the main riff. At 3'06", the riff for the chorus dissonantly smashes into things, with the solo itself alternating high and low on the guitar neck (it sounds like it should only be playable on separate tracks, but Loomis probably played it in one take). Verse chorus to the end. Awesome.

"Create the Infinite," at 3'38", is one of the shortest, yet most satisfying songs on this disc. It opens with a crazy quasi-arpeggiated "melody," then gives way to especially harsh and unhinged stop/start guitar line that pummels along as Dane sneeringly delivers his lyrics, belligerently avoiding any relationship to the music now and in the chorus. Along the way, Loomis keeps reinventing the licks he's already laid down, only adding yet more interest to an already ridiculously captivating song. And then the solo, suddenly an acoustic miasma, totally unexpected, but giving way satisfyingly to another brutal, circular riff. Wicked. Wicked, wicked, wicked.

"Who Decides," at 4'15", starts with unsettling eeriness, blasts to pieces, and then just as quickly becomes a slow, ballad-like epic. The verse opts for minor key acoustic guitar, with the chorus in slow, very down-tuned guitars, with Dane's voice lushly harmonized. Very gorgeous, and cleverly smashed at the end by some sudden, purely wicked thrash, totally dispelling the mood of the song in its last 27 seconds.

"Noumenon," at 4'37", which begins with a sitar to indicate psychedelia, is perhaps the oddest song Nevermore has ever done. Definitely not thrash, and shifting through acoustic classical bits, wild dissonance, and obscure, mystic lyrics and moods, heavy guitar accents, and nervous jittery "shivering" guitars, plus one of the fastest solos on the disc, almost wholly lost in the mix, this is almost a pastiche more than a song, and yet it hangs together anyway. ("There is no stronger drug than reality.") Noumenon means, by the way, "a posited object or event as it appears in itself independent of perception or senses"; it is the "opposite" of a phenomenon.

"Seed Awakening," at 4"30", starts with another masterpiece of wiggy guitar. From the harsh opening, the music starts to fill out, only to go back to simple again at the verse. Clarity and distortion then alternate, with the solo coming on at 250 miles per hour. At 3'59" the song ends officially, but a cutesy sitar and echoing bass drum noodle a bit on the bade-out to end the album.

This is a powerful kicker of an album. Although short, there are probably more notes in it than most full-length discs. I enthusiastically recommend it, just be sure you're getting the one you expect beforehand, and don't expect it to sound like "Politics of Ecstasy" or "This Godless Endeavor".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Infinitely better, May 11, 2005
By 
N. Kellogg "\m/" (Katonah, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
There is no one word to describe how much better this CD sounds after being remixed and remastered. There is no more muddy layer laying ontop of teh sound to distort is so that it's hard to get a clear idea of what the song actually sounds like. It's absolutely amazing the way it sounds now. It's just... so clear and sheerly awesome. It's available from CMdistro.com for $5 if you already owned it and/or you just don't care about the liner notes and re-vamped atrwork. It's $12 if you want the liner notes. This is an amazing CD. Get this CD and stay metal. \m/
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SO MUCH BETTER..., September 13, 2005
By 
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
This is so much better than the original mix.

The drums actually sound good, not that crappy "St. Anger" drum sound that was on the original mix.

The guitars aren't quite as thick, but I'll take thinner guitars over crappy drum sound any day.

Andy Sneap should get an award for his job on this remix!!!!

These songs(and I heard the original mix first) made me get into Nevermore again after 8 years of not paying attention.

Now I own the whole collection.

AMAZING, JUST AMAZING!!!!!!!

If you haven't bought any Nevermore cds, I would get this one first!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars look past the production!, September 12, 2005
By 
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
I have yet to hear the remixed version, but this is a great cd, except for the song right before the last song, it's not very good. If not for that song, I'd give it a five.

I loved Sanctuary and liked the first Nevermore cd, but never got into them since the first cd.

This cd made me realise that they do indeed rock!

The songs are amazing and hopefully the remix sounds better, but if that didn't exist, I would be more than happy with this version.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Progressive shredfest somehow spoiled by muddy production., August 23, 2005
By 
I. MUNOZ (Montreal, PQ, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Enemies of Reality (Audio CD)
This release is the second album I get from Nevermore. Compared to "This Godless Endeavour" (the other album I got) I think it's a bit more technical, but sadly the production does harm the final result -- yes, I own the original version, not the remastered one. While I love the dark, menacing sound of the rhythm guitar, the muddiness of the mix makes the listening experience not very enjoyable. It's a shame that Kelly Gray, who fairly played guitar for Queensryche, isn't equally good in playing the knobs and gauges for Nevermore. The abuse of voice overdubs (or harmonizers?), the unclear drumming and the overall felling that every instrument bleeds into the other; all that it's far from what I would call a good job. I hope the remastered version fixed all those issues -- I guess I'll purchase it, eventually.

Apart from the production problems, the songs here are very interesting. The first thing that I loved when I played the album was how Jeff Loomis doesn't shy when soloing. This guy is simply amazing, and here I guess he wanted to show his chops offs. So, be prepared to get a generous dose of serious shredding lead guitar.

Back to the songs, well, they don't have many hooks, but they do hit your head really hard. I like the dark melodies showing some modernized Iron Butterfly reminiscences. The lyrics and the arrangements are top-notch. These guys are in the league of Dream Theater and Fates Warning, no doubt about that. My personal highlights are "Never Purify" (that pounding sound, that middle section, and that fast solo!), "Noumenon" (a weird, but great song) and "Seed Awakening" (sometimes thrashy, sometimes menacing, with amazing lyrics and a very progressive feeling). I also like "I, Voyager" (for headbangers' guilty pleasures, with a "bonus" melodic chorus and a flashy guitar solo), "Ambivalent" (GREAT solo too) and "Enemies of Reality" (which contains another amazing solo from Loomis). As you see, I can remember almost every song here, so the pleasure is guaranteed for metal lovers.

To end the review, my main complains are, one, the aforementioned production problems; two, its length (it's way too short!) and three, Warrel Dane certainly is a fair-enough vocalist, but I would like him to showcase a wider range. Anyways, in spite of those (perhaps not so minor) flaws, the musicianship of these guys is so great, the compositions here are so good and the performance of the band is so tight that I don't dare to give to this album less than four stars. So, if you like a heavier variant of progressive rock, this is an album made for your tastes, besides any defect it might have. Go for it NOW!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Enemies of Reality
Enemies of Reality by Nevermore (Audio CD - 2003)
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.