Energy use statistics Does anyone know the energy use statistics of this unit? I'm trying to determine if this is more efficient than the McQuay units to heat my 1-br apartment. Considering buying the Kill-a-Watt to test myself, but if someone knows the answer or can point me to it, all the better. Many thanks!
asked by Amy on March 18, 2009
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There is no answer to your question, as energy consumption is a product of the space which the heater will be used in. At the high setting the heater consumes 1500W. If set outside on a cold day, it will run 24 hours, and that translates into 36 kwH, or $5-6 per day. But most people don't use these to heat the outdoors. Conversely, if you put it into a very well insulated space, it will run for a short while until temperature setting is reached and then will turn off. Again, the bottom line electrical costs depend on the energy efficiency of the space which is heated.
A. Thorp answered on January 20, 2010

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My electric rate is about $.14/KWH. This heater@1500 watts uses 1.5 KWH per hour at a cost of about $.21/hour.In btu/hr it puts out about 5500 BTU/hour. This compares with my #2 heating oil fired furnace which produces approximately 90000 to 100000 btu/hour. So, dont expect your 5500 BTU electric heater to go very far in heating your spaces. It is primarily designed as a people heater. If your room is at 55 degrees F and if the heater is placed on the floor approximately 3' away from your feet, it will definitely make you feel warmer, but depending on the size of the room, it could take hours to heat the whole space.
Ted Robbins answered on January 7, 2013

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In most electronics, electricity is used to do something like create light or run a circuit, and some of the electricity is always wasted in the form of generating heat. In an electric heater, all of the electricity that isn't used to run the electronic bits is used to generate heat. Any electricity that enters the unit becomes heat. There is no way to "waste" electricity in an electric heater because the only waste product is heat.
Chris Dragon answered on June 24, 2011

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My electric rate is slightly lower this year than last year (got the electric bill) and we have been using two electric heaters, this one and a bigger one In the living room.....it has been colder than last year at this time.
Jo in Nevada answered on January 15, 2013
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