Trade in your item
Get a $8.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The New England Wild Flower Society Guide to Growing and Propagating Wildflowers of the United States and Canada Hardcover – April 15, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover, April 15, 2000
$118.66 $19.00 $99.99

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Up to 50% Off Materials & Chemistry Books
For a limited time, enjoy special savings on materials and chemistry titles from Springer. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1St Edition edition (April 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395966094
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395966099
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #67,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The New England Wild Flower Society is the oldest plant conservation organization in North America. It celebrated its 100th birthday by publishing this beautiful and useful guide to identifying, growing, and propagating native wildflowers.

Cultivating and appreciating native flora is a first step towards ecological gardening, a concept whose time has come. By choosing to grow the plants that thrive naturally in the conditions your garden offers, you are working with rather than against nature, resulting in easier maintenance and a reduced need of water and chemicals. A great many of the very loveliest flowers are available as natives, such as columbines, iris, trout lilies, violets, trillium, and even orchids. The delicacy of the native species, their simple forms and unadorned beauty, make many of the cultivars we see in the nursery appear overdone and blowzy, like a girl who has overdressed for a party. Horticulturists have worked for years to make new colors, double forms, and larger, brighter flowers, but these small natives have all the appeal of the original, plus they naturally thrive in appropriate conditions.

More than a thousand species of flowers are discussed and pictured, with thorough information on native habitat, cultural requirements, propagation, and design considerations. At the back of the book are lists of plants ideal for specific situations and with certain characteristics; look here to find what species have large leaves or attract butterflies, as well as which do best in dry shade, rocky areas, bogs, and, perhaps most useful of all, which wildflowers are deer-resistant. --Valerie Easton

From Library Journal

Cullina, nursery manager and propagator for the 100-year-old New England Wild Flower Society, shares his experiences growing and propagating temperate North American wildflowers. His comprehensive treatment begins with sections on how to use the book, ecological gardening, and an explanation of the floristic provinces of North America. This introductory material is followed by the heart of the book, the "Encyclopedia of Plants," covering 200 genera and 1000 species. Arranged by genus, each entry includes a beautiful, close-up color photo of a representative of the genus, common names, a general description of the genus, cultural techniques, propagation difficulty, uses in the landscape, and any benefits for wildlife. This general description is followed by a listing of selected species. Each species entry includes hardiness zones, soil type, where the plant is native, size, flower color, and bloom time. The text continues with a section on propagation techniques, then detailed information by genus on how to harvest seed and propagate the plants by seed, division, or cutting. Appendixes include wildflowers for various sites, sources of propagated native plants and seeds, and native plant societies in the United States and Canada. Packed with information on growing and propagating wildflowers and laced with interesting personal observations and tidbits, Cullina's beautifully descriptive book makes fascinating reading while also providing extensive factual material for novice or experienced gardeners. Nothing with this scope is currently available. Highly recommended for circulating and reference collections.DSue O'Brien, Downers Grove P.L., IL
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

William Cullina (kul-EYE-nuh) Currently Bill is the Director of Horticulture/Plant Curator for one of North America's newest and most exciting public gardens, The Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine. Previously he was the Director of Horticultural Research for the New England Wild Flower Society in Massachusetts. A well known author and recognized authority on North American native plants, Cullina lectures on a variety of subjects to garden and professional groups and writes for popular and technical journals. His books include, Wildflowers, Native Trees, Shrubs, and Vines, Understanding Orchids, Native Ferns, Mosses, and Grasses, and most recently, Understanding Perennials, published in 2009. He and his wife, Melissa live with their three young children on Southport Island along the central Maine Coast. Visit his website www.williamcullina.com for writings, photography and updated lecture information.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
It would be a great addition to any gardener's library.
Cow Town Girl
For those who are unable to visit the garden, or have a question about wildflowers, Cullina's book GROWING AND PROPAGATING WILDFLOWERS is the next best thing.
Timothy Kearney
This book has the complete, clear, concise and honest information lacking in so many wildflower guides, especially when it comes to propagation.
R. Long

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Franceschi on April 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Whether you're experienced or just starting out, this book tells you everything you need to know to garden with wildflowers. Introductory sections discuss terms, issues and general cultural requirements. More than 200 color photos illustrate the over 150 genera and 1000 species covered. The info on individual plants is encyclopedic in structure and scope, but conversational in tone. This unusual and happy combination results in a reference that is at once informative and friendly, technical and anecdotal, never pedantic, and often very funny. Each entry begins with a photo of the plant, followed by a paragraph or two relating (mostly) to the genus, then small sections on culture and uses. Important or representative species of the genus (as many as 20 in the cases of Trilliums and Penstemons), with Latin and common names, each have an at-a-glance descriptive section & list of preferences, and further comments. The appendices include lists of wildflowers for specific uses, sources of plants and seeds, & plant societies. If you're considering buying a book on this subject, look no further. This one is the most current, most complete, and most fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Kearney VINE VOICE on February 1, 2004
Format: Hardcover
If you happen to be visiting The Garden in the Woods in Framingham, MA, you will probably notice a man puttering in the gardens or working in the nursery. More than likely he will instinctively know that you have a question about the wildflowers you are examining and he will be more than happy to share his knowledge. This amiable person is William Cullina of the New England Wildflower Society. For those who are unable to visit the garden, or have a question about wildflowers, Cullina's book GROWING AND PROPAGATING WILDFLOWERS is the next best thing. This coffee table style book is filled with lavish photographs and wonderful commentary about many wildflowers found in North America. The book not only assists the reader in identifying various wildflowers, but helps the reader who wishes to incorporate wildflowers in a home garden. Cullina mentions in the introduction that horticulture has been a life long passion. This is evident in his writing style. The information in the book is informative and while it is presented in a formal manner, it is non-threatening for the novice gardener. This work is not helpful just for gardeners. Photographers will appreciate the wonderful shots of the flowers, many of which were photographed by Cullina himself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Lynn A. Dickason on April 7, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Four of us took this book along when shopping at an amazing nursery...not that it failed to dissuade us from shopping to the max, but because it was the best yet information on wildflowers in cultivation and answered some of our (pretty much experienced) questions about propagation failures. This is a nice adjunct to Phillips' propagation book. Also great photography, but as usual, prefers bloom to leaf and habit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By R. Long on October 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I can't add much to Jeremy's marvelous comments; I can only reiterate the praise. This book has the complete, clear, concise and honest information lacking in so many wildflower guides, especially when it comes to propagation. It is apparent that most information comes from the personal experience of the author and I've enjoyed the comments about individual plants. My only suggestion for the next edition would be the addition of photos of the seeds on the plant, especially for species such as Pachysandra, where it is unclear exactly where to look.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By secondadd on August 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the best reference I've found for native plants, and it's a worthy book for a coffee table. Accessible and extensive, it's pleasantly written, with care information about the species and then add'l info on specific plants in the species. The photographs are often quite nice, although I wish they more consistently showed the plant's habit in addition to flowers. There's also an appendix in the back on seed propagation.
If you get this, purchase the companion shrub&tree reference, too. It's just as good.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Norman Pellett on July 8, 2009
Format: Hardcover
If you want an encyclopedia on wildflowers of the U.S. and Canada, you can't beat this one. It has an excellent introductory section on how to use the book and a succinct discussion of the effect of environmental factors such as light, soils, fertility, and temperature on native plants. He describes the floristic provinces of North America describing how the climate, soils and rainfall affect the vegetation of each region. The heart of the book is the encyclopedia of species listed in alphabetical order by genus with a plant description, hardiness zone, light requirements, soil, size, color, propagation and culture headings. Unique to this book is a section on time of seed ripening and germination requirements. Appendices list wildflowers for various sites, sources of plants and seeds, native plant societies, hardiness zone map, a bibliography, glossary and index.

While there are may be better sources on how to grow wildflowers in your garden, I find this book demonstrates Cullina's experience and expertise in understanding the wildflower world and putting his knowledge to work. Gardeners, as well as professional plants people, should have this book.

Norman Pellett, author of Gardener's Quiz Book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa6f2c3c0)