Handel: Messiah (2 CDs)

January 14, 2003 | Format: MP3

$18.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:54
30
2
2:19
30
3
3:11
30
4
2:40
30
5
1:19
30
6
4:19
30
7
2:18
30
8
0:28
30
9
5:35
30
10
1:46
30
11
3:49
30
12
4:01
30
13
2:26
30
14
1:20
30
15
1:43
30
16
4:11
30
17
0:21
30
18
4:27
30
19
2:00
30
20
2:39
30
21
10:13
30
22
2:07
30
23
1:52
30
24
4:11
Disc 2
30
1
0:46
30
2
2:16
30
3
1:31
30
4
1:32
30
5
0:14
30
6
2:07
30
7
2:57
30
8
0:13
30
9
1:25
30
10
3:16
30
11
1:08
30
12
2:16
30
13
1:15
30
14
2:34
30
15
1:35
30
16
0:11
30
17
1:59
30
18
3:48
30
19
6:26
30
20
1:59
30
21
0:29
30
22
8:17
30
23
0:15
30
24
1:19
30
25
2:46
30
26
5:05
30
27
7:32
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 30, 1992
  • Release Date: January 30, 1992
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Decca
  • Copyright: (C) 1992 Universal International Music B.V.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:17:20
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0015REYOK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,454 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
85%
4 star
11%
3 star
0%
2 star
4%
1 star
0%
See all 27 customer reviews
This is one of the best performances ever of Handel's Messiah.
paulusrex
The choir singing is excellent -- the tempos for such favorites such as "For unto us a Child is born" is just perfect -- not too fast or slow, but graceful and lively.
moviemusicbuff
Music and vocals are very precise and crisp yet not artificial or starchy sounding.
William R. Harrison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Bill King on October 25, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This 1982 Phillips _Messiah_ by Sir John Gardiner is still very often recomended as the best. But keep in mind that no version is generaly recognized as definative so it's wise to sample before purchase. With that in mind, I'm happy to say that right now (Oct 2004) you can hear all the tracks over on Amazon's page for another boxset of this same recording.

Actually there's three, this two disk Phillips version, an older three disk version (the identical recording but with the same tracks spread over three disks and therefore higher priced), and a one disk 'highlights'.

Search Gardiner Handel Messiah to jump to the three disk page, Sample from disk two _The Lord gave the word_, and _Why do the nations?..._ This will demonstrate how every part of the staged ensemble can be discerned with clarity, in either chorus or aria.

Precision playing is a Gardiner trademark. Note his style is stately rather than devotional; the presentation is dramatic and energetic, rather than emotional. As a result I found this recording of lasting appeal, and never got tired of it over all these years.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By moviemusicbuff on December 22, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the best versions of Handel's Messiah. J. Eliot Gardiner is always great with conducting oratorios and this version is done on authentic instruments with a smaller choir. The choir singing is excellent -- the tempos for such favorites such as "For unto us a Child is born" is just perfect -- not too fast or slow, but graceful and lively. The soprano, Margaret Marshall, is particularly outstanding and beautiful, especially on arias such as "Rejoice Greatly," and "For My Redeemer Liveth." The tenor, Rolfe Johnson is also wonderful. Some of the alto pieces are sung by a male alto and others by the female alto. The only soloist that I found somewhat disappointing was the bass, especially on "For the trumpet shall sound" -- his singing was pretty heavy-handed and not distinct enough on the words "for the trumpet shall sound." (I listen to other versions for the bass solos).

That aside, I still love this version of the Messiah and would rate it as one of the best versions of Handel's Messiah alongside Trevor Pinnock's version, which I also highly recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Eric A. Isaacson on December 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Some believe Handel's "Messiah" is best performed by massive choirs accompanied by gigantic orchestras playing modern instruments. I do not. Those performances, whatever their overpowering grandiosity, end up being ponderous and remote. They simply lack the immediacy, intimacy, and direct emotive power of this smaller ensemble accompanied by period instruments.

Gardiner's recording of the "Messiah" is, far and away, my favorite. It is clear and crisp. The tempo and instrumentation are lively. The vocals are close, personal, and genuinely moving.

This is what the "Messiah" should be. The layers of pomposity afflicting so many grandiose recordings have been stripped away, leaving an immediate sound and starkly human story with which the listener connects directly.

The soloists all are wonderful. I suppose that some modern ears, unaccustomed to the sound of a counter-tenor, may find Charles Brett's voice a little off-putting at first. I have grown to love it.

But I particularly like the use of the boy soprano, Saul Quirke, who tells us of "shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night" when "lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them and the glory of the Lord shone round about them and they were sore afraid."

Sore afraid indeed! No other recording of this passage that I have heard so effectively communicates the terror these shepherds must have felt. I connect with them as human beings, and I share their relief as Saul Quirke's clear, innocent, unaffected voice reassures them: "Fear not; for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be unto all people. For unto you is born this day, in the city of David, a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Neaklaus VINE VOICE on November 4, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This recording is a reissue of Phillips 411041 which is a Three
Disc set. Universal Classics which includes Decca who now owns
Phillips decided to make this recording a little bit more
affordable by issuing it on Two CDs It is still one of the best
"Original Instrument" "Messiah" recordings on the market today.
This in an ever growing field of Messiah recordings. Enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By paisan on January 11, 2010
Format: Audio CD
I first heard this version of The Messiah in 1988. Nearly 20 years later, I have yet to hear a better production. There are, I theorize, two reasons for this. First, you'll note that the choir is conservative in number. Rather than go for a big and grand sound with more members, this choir gives a full and precise vocal response with less members. If you have rhapsody, or if you can login to a Rhapsody trial, listen to my absolute favorite choral performance, His Yoke Is Easy. The last 30 seconds you'll hear "His Yoke is Easy .......... AND his burden is light" The "and" is hit with absolute accuracy and tightness.

I do not know if the orchestra was treated the same way; but, again, the string and brass section provide a full and grand sound. Another reviewer mentioned the unbelievable arias and I concur with his recommendation.

But, second, I have to say that the selling point of this CD set is the use of a boy soprano for the recitative "There were shepherds abiding in the field". Listen first to any other recording of this recitative. It will be by a female soprano. This version is by a boy soprano. Listen to this one next and it will make you wish you were with the shepherds that night long ago.

Some quick final notes. I am disappointed in the Amen's at the end of Messiah -- it should be largo, not allegro. The bass/baritone solos are powerful and nearly intimidating -- note Why Do The Nations. I could do without the counter-tenors, but it's still Handel's music that seeps into the soul regardless of the tone. Again, listen to other samples from other cd's -- I'm POSITIVE that this is the one you will buy.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews