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Why Do English Language Learners Struggle With Reading?: Distinguishing Language Acquisition From Learning Disabilities Paperback – March 20, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-1412941471 ISBN-10: 1412941474

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Corwin (March 20, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1412941474
  • ISBN-13: 978-1412941471
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 7.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #581,979 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Tackles the very difficult issue of why ELLs are disproportionately represented in special education and how, as educators, we need to look at our assessments to verify that there is a true need for referral versus a lack of understanding of the language acquisition process." (Christine Engel, ESL Teacher 2007-11-05)

"Distinguishing learning disabilities from language acquisition issues has always been difficult. This book is relevant to many educators." (James Becker, ELL Teacher 2007-11-05)

"We need better assessment strategies to determine learning disabilities in ELL students. This book is highly relevant as not only does it address this issue, but offers practical suggestions and approaches to remedy the problem." (Anne Beveridge, Coordinator of Primary Years Program 2007-11-05)

About the Author

Janette K. Klingner was a bilingual special education teacher for ten years before earning a PhD in Reading and Learning Disabilities from the University of Miami. Her recently coauthored or coedited books include Teaching Reading Comprehension to Sudents With Learning Difficulties (Guilford Press), Methods for Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners (Merrill/Prentice Hall), Case Studies in the Social Construction of Disability: Minority Students in Special Education (Teachers College Press), Evidence-Based Practices for Response to Intervention (Brookes), and Why Are so Many Minority Students in Special Education?: Understanding Race and Disability in Schools (Teachers College Press).

John J. Hoover is a former K-12 special education teacher for students with learning disabilities and emotional/behavior disorders in several states in the Midwest, West, and Southwest. Publications include his forthcoming book, Differentiating Learning Differences from Learning and Behavioral Disabilities: Teaching diverse learners through multi-tiered response to intervention (Allyn & Bacon), and recent books coauthored/coedited include Methods for Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners (Pearson Merrill); Curriculum Adaptations for Students with Learning and Behavior Problems: Differentiating instruction to meet diverse needs (Pro-Ed); and Teaching Study Skills to Students with Learning Problems (Pro-Ed). His forthcoming tests include the Early Literacy Measure (Pro-Ed) and the Behavior Skills Rating System (Pro-Ed). He earned a BA in elementary and special education (mental retardation), an MA in learning disabilities and emotional disorders with an emphasis in reading, and a PHD in curriculum, specializing in special education.



Leonard M. Baca has been a professor of education at the University of Colorado-Boulder since 1973. He has taught courses in bilingual and bilingual special education and served as the program chair. Baca is founder and director of the BUENO Center for Multicultural Education. He is the author of The Bilingual Special Education Interface (Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2004) and several articles dealing with English Language Learners with disabilities. He earned his EdD from the University of Northern Colorado.

More About the Author

John J. Hoover is a Research Associate and Adjunct Faculty in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is a former special education teacher and supervisor, having taught learners with high- and low-incidence disabilities in grades K-12 in the public schools and also alternative educational settings. Dr. Hoover's current research, writing and professional development topics of interest include: response to intervention, curriculum differentiation, and the assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. Harrell on July 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book for those who have not been trained in working with ELL students. For those who have already been trained, this does not add a whole lot more, although it helped reframe or reinforce some ideas.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Ellingwood VINE VOICE on June 5, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
OK book on how to differentiate between a child learning English as a academic language and a child who also has a learning disability. The book reads like an academic paper provides good information on people learning English but has a strong bent towards the fashionable language of the current academic climate and I don't think it will help students, parents or educators decide who has a learning disability anymore than past books have. The author seems to be more anxious about backing up her sources, even when they don't quite jell together into a whole than really writing a good insightful book on her subject. Guess we could have just read her tables and charts.
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By MaestraM on May 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was a text from a graduate class about assessing ELLs. If I had been in the first or second class towards my M.Ed. (ELL concentration) it would have been more helpful. It seemed just more of the same from what all the other texts were saying. I will admit that I did not read the book in its entirety, and I did glean a little new information from the 3 chapters I read thoroughly. I don't think this is a book I'd refer to for reference really, and for that reason I'm glad I spent less $$ and got the ebook version.
I agree with the reviewer that mentioned that it would be a good read for a non-ELL teacher, especially an administrator who is looking for more insight for working with ELL students and helping them succeed.
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