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English Standard Version Bible with Apocrypha Hardcover – January 1, 2009


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Hardcover, January 1, 2009
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1446 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (January 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195289102
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195289107
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #155,184 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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58 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Mccormick on January 28, 2009
Overall, I think the product, itself, is quite good. Since there was very little information about it given on any of the vendor websites, I must say I am pleasantly surprised. It contains the 2007 edition of the ESV, with the new Oxford 2009 ESV Apocrypha. The new translation of the Apocrypha (Deuterocanonicals) is really an updating of the older RSV Expanded Apocrypha. The Preface to the Apocrypha says that this edition's goal was "updating archaic language, clarifying obscure words, removing inaccuracies, and bringing punctuation up to current American standards." Also, the edition of Esther in the Apocrypha seems to be the full Greek version, not just the extra chapters.

The Table of Contents Lists the Following:
Alphabetic Listing of Books of the Bible
Alphabetic Listing of Books of the Apocrypha
Preface to the ESV
Explanation of Features
OT
NT
Apocrypha Table of Contents
Preface to Apocrypha
Apocrypha/Deuterocanonicals
Tables of Weights and Measures
Oxford Maps (9)

Positive features:

1) I really like the size of this Bible. I was worried at first that it might be too big and heavy, but it really isn't. In fact, if I were to compare it to one of my other Bibles, it is almost identical in size with the Ignatius RSV-2CE. As a matter of fact, it may be a touch smaller, but not by much.

2) The page layout is pretty good. I think it is similar to many of the Crossway ESV editions that I have looked at in the past, although I could be wrong on that. Each page contains paragraph headings, textual notes, alternative renderings, and cross-references (primarily in NT).

3) It seems to have a solid binding. (I am no expert on this however!) It also lays open nice and rests well in the hand.
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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By J. L. Harper on January 23, 2009
A friend just bought this and showed it to me. The Apocrypha is included at the back, after the NT. Its translation is nicely readable, and a very full corpus of apocrypha was translated (including 3-4 Macc and 2 Esdr). Greek Esther was translated in its entirety, though the chapter numbering is odd--for the portions shared with Hebrew Esther are numbered as Hebrew Esther is numbered.

The binding is very nice--as one would expect from OUP. The pages (nice, thin, opaque paper) are sewn in small signatures and well bound together. On the other hand, the cover is very, VERY bright red--much brighter than the pictures seem to be.

Nevertheless, a good value and translation.
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55 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Richard W. Papuga on January 27, 2009
I have been waiting for an ESV with Apocrypha and am not disappointed in the least with the translation, however the book itself leaves much to be desired.

1. The cover is a very glossy bright red.

2. The Apocryphal books are at the very end of the volume, not in the Catholic order or even between the testaments as is customary these days.

3. There are no cross-references.

4. The pages are so ultra-thin you can literally read through to the reverse side, let alone even trying to highlight or mark the text in any way.

Perhaps we can hope for a more well-constructed book in the future, and greater accuracy in item descriptions.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Frost on December 19, 2011
Overall, if you want a relatively modern English language bible that is relatively easy-to-read with the complete canon of "Apocrypha" used by Orthodox, Roman Catholics, and Anglicans, that was crafted mostly by more traditional Protestant scholars, then this is the bible for you! [The new Common English Bible (CEB) w/Apocrypha had a large ecumenical translation team and has direct ties to 5 mainline protestant publishing houses (DC, ECUSA, PCUSA, UCC, & UMC).]

As a Greek Orthodox Christian I look for bibles that contain our complete canon of the Old Testament (since it comes from the pre-Christian era Septuagint translation which was most heavily used by the NT authors), which includes what Protestants refer to as the Apocrypha and Roman Catholics as Deutero-canonical/Apocryphal books. Thankfully, this version has all the books used by the Greek and Slavonic Churches, the Roman Catholic Church, and by the Anglican Communion:

- It has all of the OT books used by Roman Catholics, Orthodox, and Anglicans: i.e., Tobit thru 2nd Maccabees.
- It has all those in Anglican and Orthodox bibles but not in RC bibles: i.e., all those above plus 1st & 2nd Esdras and the Prayer of Manasseh (that RCs now consider "apocrypha" but not deutero-canoncial).
- It has all those in Orthodox bibles but in neither RC (that RCs consider apocryphal) or Anglican ones: i.e., Psalm 151, and 3rd & 4th Maccabees

This is a truly ecumenical bible that can be used by all Christians.

When analyzing this specific edition of the ESV, "with Apocryhpa", I'm looking mainly at things not directly tied to the translation itself. The translation is what it is and anyone buying a bible should spend some time reading portions to see if they like what they are reading.
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A Catholic Christian's dilemma regarding use of the Revised Standard Version (R.S.V.) of the Holy Bible is taking another route to solution with the publication of the English Standard Version (E.S.V.) Bible with the deutero-canonical writings (identified in it as "Apocrypha") included. The two R.S.V. Bibles as edited specifically for Roman Catholic (R.C.) use, the R.S.V. "Catholic Edition" (R.S.V.-C.E.) and "Second Catholic Edition" (R.S.V.-2nd C.E.) have served only as "half-way houses" in this regard, despite what their titles promise, in spite of their incorporation of the R.C. deutero-canonical writings of the ecumenical R.S.V.'s "Apocrypha" to their places interspersed within the Old Testament (O.T.) canon, and notwithstanding their adjustments of the renderings of some passages in the New Testament (N.T.) to conform their readings to specifically R.C. preferences and concerns, since too much liberal Protestant residue remains in the R.S.V. translation itself even after all of these adjustments, to varying extents, have been made.

Although the entire Authorised "King James" Version (A.V.), with its own "Apocrypha" (deutero-canonical writings) included, was always primary in this reviewer's life, the R.S.V. (alike in Protestant, ecumumenical, and Catholic editions) also figured rather a lot over the years in Bible reading and study. The main problems with the R.S.V. have been, and still are, its liberal bias in translation, especially in rendering scriptural passages touching on Christology and the Holy Trinity (as well, occasionally, as some readings affecting other doctrines), in addition to the R.S.V.'s resort to the so-called "Critical Text" of the Greek N.T. (mostly according to the various Nestle-Aland and U.B.S.
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