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Enlightened Polymer Clay: Artisan Jewelry Designs Inspired by Nature Paperback – March 6, 2012


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Enlightened Polymer Clay: Artisan Jewelry Designs Inspired by Nature + Masters: Polymer Clay: Major Works by Leading Artists + The Art of Polymer Clay Creative Surface Effects: Techniques and Projects Featuring Transfers, Stamps, Stencils, Inks, Paints, Mediums, and More
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 74 pages
  • Publisher: Interweave (March 6, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596686340
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596686342
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 7.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #205,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Altogether I find this an excellent resource... The author is obviously a very creative and original jewelry designer with a unique aesthetic who shares new ways to be creative and artistic with clay. For this reason, I'm happy to give this book five stars." - Sharilyn Miller, author, Wire Art Jewelry Workshop

"Jewelry artist Rie Nagumo has a way of looking at polymer clay and working with it that is completely unexpected and delightful. There is an organic quality to Rie's designs, but also a precision in the simple and elegant forms." - Cyndi Lavin, Beading-Arts.com

"This book made me start thinking of polymer clay and jewelry designing in a very different way.... What Rie Nagumo does with polymer clay is mind-blowing and amazing and just beautiful!" - Tammy Powley, About.com Guide to Jewelry Making

"Delivers polymer clay that looks like anything but plastic! The pieces included in this book by Rie Nagumo are delicate and organic. Many of her forms have translucence that adds an extra dimension with light." - CraftGossip.com

"If your idea of polymer clay is clunky, chunky lifeless pieces then be prepared for a surprise as most of these designs are quirky, light and just plain fun." - Sandy Amazeen, MonstersandCritics.com

"To learn more about making polymer clay jewelry and to be inspired by twenty-nine polymer clay jewelry designs that are, I dare say, unlike others you've seen, get your copy of Rie Nagumo's Enlightened Polymer Clay. Whether you're entirely new to polymer clay or have been using it for years, you'll be comfortable with and inspired by this gorgeous little book." - Tammy Jones, JewelryMakingDaily.com

About the Author

Rie Nagumo is a jeweler and artist specializing in polymer and metal clay. She lives, works, and teaches in Japan.


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Customer Reviews

Secondly there are almost no pictures on the instruction pages, only text.
SquirrelGirl
The author is obviously a very creative and original jewelry designer with a unique aesthetic who shares new ways to be creative and artistic with clay.
Sharilyn Miller
Only two projects in the book (out of the 29 projects shown) made me look to the directions.
Peggy Bellm

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

134 of 136 people found the following review helpful By Lyone Fein on March 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I consider myself an intermediate level polymer clay artist. I have been making and selling jewelry made from my own beads for the past 15 years or so, and I am accomplished in a number of standard polymer clay techniques, as well as jewelry-making practices, etc. So when I add my voice to those critical of this book, it is not simply because I don't know my way around a pasta machine.

Like many (I suspect), I was seduced by the image on the cover of the book, and so I will use this very project as an example in my critique. Under the section called Forming, the author gives instruction to "Cut out a clay piece to the shape of the [wire] frame, apply the bond to the frame, and insert the clay." It would be helpful to receive some other information from her regarding this process--or at least some suggestions regarding: 1. the most useful tools for removing the clay from the parchment paper so as to cause the least amount of distortion and/or tearing, 2. how much bond to apply to the frame and the best tools to use for this, 3. how tight the fit needs to be to ensure that the pieces will stay together during transfer into the oven, 4. whether excess bonding material needs to be wiped off before baking, etc.

In addition to the problem of her very sketchy instructions, what she calls finishing has to do with attaching the non-polymer aspects to the pieces: wires, ribbons, etc. In regard to many projects there is absolutely no information at all given about finishing the actual beads themselves (ie: sanding, buffing, or other forms of polishing), yet everything is made by hand and must be covered by fingerprints when it is done baking! If someone were to follow her instructions, their pieces would look so amateurish simply because of this last aspect.
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61 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Sharilyn Miller on February 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
As others have noted in previous reviews, this book is not especially geared toward the novice polymer clay artist. Thankfully, there are TONS of books already published with detailed descriptions and photo demonstrations of the basics, and this slim 72-page volume does not repeat much of this information. It is assumed that you already know how to condition polymer clay, form and shape it, roll it out evenly, bake it, etc. And the really basic jewelry skills such as beading, crimping, etc. are assumed.
If you're an experienced jewelry artist hungry for new techniques and new ideas for using polymer clay to make unusual jewelry, this book should satisfy. The author has a delicate touch with clay, rolling it out super-thin and making eeny-weeny shapes (porcupine quills, tiny tendrils, etc.) and even shaving it in thin slices that are overlapped to make authentic looking flowers, leaves, and other organic shapes. She teaches different techniques such as mokume gane, canes, image transfers, bead shaping, layering clays in unusual ways to make unique beads, color mixing, and more. Her jewelry samples are truly unique; I own most of the published books on polymer clay and in this text I have found several ideas that are brand-new to me.
The first half of the book provides full-page, full-color photos of the finished jewelry with brief descriptions. To learn how to make each piece, you turn to the second half of the book where instructions with excellent color photos and diagrams are provided. An accurate color chart of Fimo classic colors is also included, which is very helpful.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Evelyn Coleman on February 22, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The photos are great, however if you are new to polymer clay I would recommend other books first. This book is very sparse on "technique" and explanation as to "how" as well. It could just be the language translation.... I am not sorry I bought the book as I have at least 15 books on Polymer but I would have been disappointed if this were my first introduction. I bought it just to find out how to make something as thin and delicate as the leaves on the cover without it breaking. I'll post again if the directions lead me to this same result.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By linda linebaugh on February 24, 2012
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This book is organized like many Japanese beading books where there are project pictures in the front and "directions" in the back. The How-to is so scant that I doubt many could reproduce the project UNLESS already able to figure it out from the finished piece....I suspect all of the info is there but it is really scattered and in such an abbreviated form that it is close to useless w/o major scrutiny. Perhaps this style works with people trained to it, but for an American audience, I don't think so. It is not a book appropriate for "visual" learners. The project pictures in the front are yummy, but in reality, I feel cheated by the lack of how-to eye candy. (I do appreciate not having to wade thru 25 pages of clay and tool "basics" that seem to take up too many pages in many new books.) I also think that adding PMC to such a book just confuses the issue further. I have almost every polymer clay book ever published (English and foreign) and I really wish I hadn't bothered with this one. Perhaps the eye candy is worth something....but there are so many better choices even for advanced clayers. The title is very presumptuous. The editor must not be familiar with the polymer clay community and our expectations.
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