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1 Enoch: A New Translation; Based on the Hermeneia Commentary Paperback – Large Print, November 1, 2004

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Paperback, Large Print, November 1, 2004
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

--George W. E. Nickelsburg is Emeritus Professor of Religion at the University of Iowa, where he taught for more than three decades. He is the author of seventy articles and several hundred dictionary and encyclopedia entries. Among his many works are Faith and Piety in Early Judaism (co-editor; Fortress Press, 1983) and Early Judaism and Its Modern Interpreters (co-editor; 1986).

--James VanderKam is the John A. O'Brien Professor of Hebrew Scriptures at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. He is the author of numerous works, including The Dead Sea Scrolls Today (1994), An Introduction to Early Judaism (2001), The Book of Jubilees (2001), and The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls (with Peter Flint, 2002). --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Fortress Press (November 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002G9U3NM
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.4 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,362,606 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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47 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on August 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
The collaborative effort of George W. E. Nickelsburg (Professor Emeritus, University of Iowa) and James C. VanderKam (John A. O'Brien Professor of Hebrew Scriptures, University of Notre Dame, Indiana), 1 Enoch: A New Translation is an invaluable work and a welcome addition to Biblical Studies. Based on the Hermeneia commentary, 1 Enoch is divided into five sections, followed by two brief appendices: The Book of the Watchers, The Book of Parables, The Book of the Luminaries, The Dream Visions, The Epistle of Enoch, The Birth of Noah, and Another Book by Enoch. Different sections portray the evolution of stages of Enochic tradition, which are linked by a common world view that considers the present world incurably corrupt and unjust, in need of divine judgment and renewal. Claiming to transmit divine revelation, as given to Enoch in primordial times and made public in the last days to perpetuate the community of the chosen, 1 Enoch is translated with every effort to present ancient writings as clearly and intelligibly to the reader as possible. Extensive footnotes, annotations and reference allow this complex script to be comprehensible to lay readers (with effort), and 1 Enoch: A New Translation is an enthusiastically recommended primary source for religious studies and reference shelves.
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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Eibert Tigchelaar on January 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
There are several recent translations of 1 Enoch (or Ethiopic Enoch) in English, including those of Knibb (1978), Isaac (1983), Black (1985) and Olson (2004) [not to mention recent reprints of outdated nineteenth century translations by Dillmann, Laurence and Schodde, or that of Charles (1912, 2003)] but the present new translation by Nickelsburg and VanderKam is bound to be the authoritative one for decades to come. First, because they are the two major American specialists of 1 Enoch, both also involved in the Hermeneia commentary on 1 Enoch. Second, because their excellent translation with extensive footnotes is based upon textcritical analysis of the Ethiopic, as well as the Aramaic and Greek texts. Thirdly, because this edition is attractive, cheap and convenient. Whereas scholars may want to buy several translations, this is the best buy for students and all others interested in Early Judaism and New Testament backgrounds.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By JMS on July 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
The size of this translation makes it extremely handy for travel and quick reference. This is especially useful as it is the most up-to-date scholarly collation and translation of Enoch available in English. The only annoyance is the lack of reference available to the original languages which are translated; one is either refered to the first volume of the Hermeneia commentary, or has the wait on the forthcoming second volume. Overall, however, it is extremely useful for anyone working in Second Temple Judaism or Early Christianity.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jordan Pariah on August 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Since I do not know Greek, Ethiopic, or Aramaic, I can say nothing about the translation itself. I can, however, offer my comments and experience as a reader. In previous readings (or attempts at reading) the books of Enoch in other translations, I was constantly struggling to make sense of the text. It seemed broken, disjointed, and confused. Reading this translation was like a breath of fresh air. It does not attempt to remain faithful to a single manuscript or to preserve the structure and content as it is. This is an eclectic representation that seeks to present the material in its most logically consistent meaning and structure. Large portions of text have been cut out of their original places in the manuscripts and re-inserted where they most likely belong. Many conjectural emendations have been provided that (at least superficially) appear to make a great deal of sense. Pieces of the Aramaic scrolls from the Dead Sea that were deemed too insignificant to mention in some English volumes (Vermes' Complete DSS In English) are provided in footnotes in ways that enhance or deepen understanding. And in every place where the text has been altered either in word meaning, sentence or word order, or chapter placement and structure, notes are provided that explain the reasons for these things and how it differs from or finds support in the extant manuscripts. The original chapter and verse divisions have even been retained, despite their now non-linear sequence, which makes open and visible when and where the translator is working behind the scenes to restore something that has suffered many disparities and alterations. Instead of fighting with this translation, I was able to absorb it.Read more ›
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Orville B. Jenkins VINE VOICE on March 2, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a very interesting document. This is a new translation and commentary, with excellent textual critical notes by the translators. The document is very important for historical and cultural studies of the Jews up to the time of Christ.

Though this work never became part of the holy writings of either Christians or Jews, it seems to be quoted or referred to in the New Testament books of Jude (verses 14-15) and 2 Peter (2:4). The work called 1 Enoch is actually a compilation of what appear to originally have been three texts, originally written in the 300s BC and later.

This was a very widely-circulated document in the Jewish community of the Roman Empire, originally written in Aramaic, and four copies of the Aramaic manuscript have been found at Qumran. The translators have performed extensive comparative critical work on versions in Aramaic, Ge`ez (ancient Ethiopic, the ancestor of modern Amharic and Tigrinya), Syriac and Greek. The wide circulation of the document and its high use is indicated by the many variations of the text.

Pre-Roman Era
First Enoch is important because it fills in several gaps in previous knowledge of the era of Palestine leading up to the Roman period. It contains an astronomical section describing the synchronization of lunar and solar calendars. More important it contains details of the extensive Jewish folklore that had developed over the centuries after the Babylonian Exile that attempt to fill out the vague and intriguing references in the Torah to ancient figures.

One important story concerns the "Watchers," the race or class of beings quickly referred to in passing in Genesis 6 as "The Sons of God." This passage states the Sons of God liked the Daughters of Humans and took them as wives.
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