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Entanglement Paperback – September 30, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Plume; Reissue edition (September 30, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452284570
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452284579
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.6 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #199,743 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

An elegant and simple account of scientific creativity in action. -- Columbia Daily Spectator

[Entanglement is] perhaps the best lay description of the evolution and current state of quantum physics available today. -- Focus

About the Author

Amir D. Aczel, Ph.D., is the author of 17 books on mathematics and science, some of which have been international bestsellers. Aczel has taught mathematics, statistics, and history of science at various universities, and was a visiting scholar at Harvard in 2005-2007. In 2004, Aczel was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is also the recipient of several teaching awards, and a grant from the American Institute of Physics to support the writing of two of his books. Aczel is currently a research fellow in the history of science at Boston University. The photo shows Amir D. Aczel inside the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the international laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, while there to research his new book, "Present at the Creation: The Story of CERN and the Large Hadron Collider"--which is about the search for the mysterious Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle," dark matter, dark energy, the mystery of antimatter, Supersymmetry, and hidden dimensions of spacetime.

More About the Author

Amir D. Aczel, Ph.D., is the author of 17 books on mathematics and science, some of which have been international bestsellers. Aczel has taught mathematics, statistics, and history of science at various universities, and was a visiting scholar at Harvard in 2005-2007. In 2004, Aczel was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is also the recipient of several teaching awards, and a grant from the American Institute of Physics to support the writing of two of his books. Aczel is currently a research fellow in the history of science at Boston University. The photo shows Amir D. Aczel inside the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the international laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, while there to research his new book, "Present at the Creation: The Story of CERN and the Large Hadron Collider"--which is about the search for the mysterious Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle," dark matter, dark energy, the mystery of antimatter, Supersymmetry, and hidden dimensions of spacetime.
See Amir D. Aczel's webpage: http://amirdaczel.com
Video on CERN and the Large Hadron Collider: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Ncx8TE2JMo

Customer Reviews

There are lots of nice graphics; UF, they are poorly explained (in one case, not at all).
Libris Vermis
Amir Aczel's book "Entanglement" is a great introduction to the subject for the non-physicist, or the future physicist, in my case.
Kindle Customer
I will have to go through some of the experiments in better detail to fully understand them but I must say that I learned a lot.
Jacob D. B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Duwayne Anderson on September 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best books I've read this year. It's easy to read, highly informative, accurate and fun. Aczel has done a masterful job of combining a book on scientific history with an introductory tomb explaining one of the especially non-intuitive aspects of the quantum world - the entanglement of multiple quantum particles.

Entanglement as a consequence of quantum mechanics was actually predicted by Einstein and used in a thought experiment to try and discredit the new theory. Einstein believed in strict determinism and considered quantum mechanics to be incomplete. He had a lifelong friendship and debate with Bohr, who was one of the founders of quantum theory. Einstein, along with Podolsky and Rosen developed a "thought experiment" in which the outcome was so weird - if quantum physics was correct - that it simply couldn't be accepted (by Einstein, anyway). Einstein considered this weird outcome in quantum mechanics to essentially prove that it was incomplete.

In Einstein's thought experiment he imagined two entangled quantum particles whose quantum properties were dependent upon each other. For example, the particles could be photons produced by a reaction that starts out with zero spin. Since spin is conserved, and photons have integral spin, if one photon has spin +1 the other must have spin -1.

Quantum mechanics says that, until the particles are measured, their spins are in a superposition of states, and when one photon's spin is measured, the other photon instantly assumes the opposite spin - no matter how far apart the two are. Indeed, before they are measured, quantum mechanics doesn't treat the two photons as distinctly different particles at all.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A. Fischer on May 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
I should begin by saying that I was expecting (or hoping for) a different book, though perhaps from the other book by Aczel that I have read (Mystery of the Aleph), my expectations were probably misplaced. The book that I was hoping for would have been much more technical, though given the fact that only a handful of equations appeared in the book at all, this would not be difficult), and one that would explain what this entanglement thing is, or at least provide arguments for some of the prevailing theories.
What this book did provide, though, was a brief account of the history of entanglement as a controversial physical concept. I first encountered entanglement while doing some studies in quantum computation, and my studies were on the computer science/mathematical side, which basically meant that entanglement was a given, and it never really occurred to me that there would have been much controversy --- in retrospect, this was quite naive of me. By going through the breakthroughs made by many physicists over the passed century, Aczel was able to bring light to the fact that while science textbooks state principles as undeniable truths, doing science and interpreting science are more akin to a somewhat political struggle. For this reason, there is much to commend this book.
However, a great shortcomming is the length. The book is divided into 20 chapters with an average length of about 12 short pages. Most chapters have a two-fold purpose --- to introduce and give a brief biographical sketch (leaning more towards intellectual development) of someone involved in the history of entanglement, and also to explain briefly what that person did.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Metallurgist TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 9, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this book to be interesting, but not the easiest book that is devoted to the idea of quantum entanglement. I also have a problem with the subtitle, which I think is highly misleading. The spookiness referred to was not Einstein's idea, and the book is about how he was wrong in his objection to the spookiness inherent in others' interpretation of quantum mechanics, an interpretation that he did not believe in, but one that has stood the test of experimental verification. Since the publisher generally writes titles and subtitles I will try to ignore this misrepresentation.

The first half of the book is concerned with background material covering the Thomas Young double slit experiment, the beginnings of quantum mechanics and Einstein's objection to the standard interpretation of the peculiarities of the double slit experiment performed on individual photons or electrons. This is a general treatment, with no mathematics, but one that I found a little more complex than that in Rosenblum and Kuttner's "The Quantum Enigma", and not as detailed as that given by John Gribben in "In Search of Schroodingers Cat". Among these books, I prefer the one in Gribbin's book the best, but for someone with no math or physics background at all I would recommend "the Quantum Enigma" for this sort of background material.

The last half of Entanglement is concerned with Bell's Inequality, the idea of entangled quantum states and the experimental verification of Bell's ideas. I would recommend this book for someone who is specifically interested in this material. This book provides a very personal account, gained from interviews with the participants. It is quite interesting and shows the interactions between physicists and how they went about designing and performing their experiments.
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