Buy New
$18.67
Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.95
  • Save: $10.28 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Enterprising Women: Television Fandom and the Creation of Popular Myth (Contemporary Ethnography) Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$63.58
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.67
$18.67 $2.48 $30.00

Frequently Bought Together

Enterprising Women: Television Fandom and the Creation of Popular Myth (Contemporary Ethnography) + Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World + Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet: New Essays
Price for all three: $74.37

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Contemporary Ethnography
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (December 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812213793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812213799
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #807,700 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Enterprising Women offers a picture of one of the few models around for female community and self-affirmation. Rather than accepting the passive female images and consumer values purveyed by most TV shows, women fan-fiction writers have adapted television to their own purposes."—Women's Review of Books



"Bacon-Smith's many years of skillful ethnographic research and lucid prose help nonfans understand the cultural and theoretical significance of the fan-produced fiction, artwork, and social relations that make fandom so cohesive and critically essential to its members. . . . Both males and females in communications, sociology, ethnography, psychology, and women's studies will benefit from this fine book."—Choice

About the Author

By Camille Bacon-Smith

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Chapulina R on July 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Being a woman who is an occasional writer of Klingon fan-novellas, I was interested in this scholarly book on fanfic and its female following. The author does an in-depth study of female fans of not only Star Trek, but Blake's 7 (a British sci-fi series), Starskiy & Hutch, The Man From Uncle, Alien Nation, Doctor Who, and other TV shows. Her conclusions: 98% of fanfic is written by women, who prefer intimacy, character-interaction, and continuity over action and special-effects. (I guess that makes me a "2%er" -- I prefer plot-driven adventure, decriptive carnage, and characters of my own creation.) Immersing herself in the subculture, Bacon-Smith delves into the very personal and sometimes secretive world of 'zines and fannish writing. With great respect toward the community which generously contributed to her study, she exposes the genres of fiction which appeal to most female writers and readers. They are the "MarySue" and "LaySpock" which are basically an extension of the writers' own personnae and fantasies; the "Hurt-Comfort" tender tales of nurturing and caretaking; and "Slash" or erotica featuring explicit sex between established characters. Bacon-Smith also cautiously explores the underground realm of homoerotic "Slash" (sometimes called "K/S" after Kirk/Spock) in which female fans envision intimate relationships between the two male partners of various favorite series. This is an intriguing book, containing much technical terminology and psych-evaluation. I thought I might identify with it, but instead I found the subculture wholly alien (no pun intended). At least I know now why my klinzines are not a big hit with the mainstream fandom!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. McLeod on July 19, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a woman in my twenties and I belong to several television fandoms. My intellectual interest in fandom piqued recently, and prompted me to read Enterprising Women. The subject is fans, their activities, relationships and motivations, set in the 1980's. The author is an ethnographer who uses almost a decade of live observations, interviews and some traditional research to inform a variety of conclusions about who fans are and why they do what they do.

From the perspective of someone who grew up on Fanfiction.net and LiveJournal kink memes its interesting to compare fan activities now vs then. The internet, as a single factor, has transformed nearly every facet of fandom explored in this text including zines and real life fan interactions (clubs and conventions). Its also fun to see pictures of 80s's Trek conventions and to hear about fans who laid the groundwork for fandom today.

But despite these differences, several observations ring true to me today, 20 years after this book was written. One is the risk inherent to fan fiction writing, not only with copyright issues but social issues around the slash (homosexual romance) and hurt/comfort genres. Another is the treatment of Mary Sue, a character archetype annoying to all who read her, but a label which is often leveled against competent female characters. Bacon-Smith makes a valid observation I think that many writers choose to write for male characters because its so hard to write an original female character that can't be accused of being a Mary Sue.

Regarding the author's conclusions, its difficult for me to judge simply because this study took place before I was born. Its a culture from a time that I can understand at least at surface level, but have never experienced first hand.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kate Bolin on March 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
A fascinating look at fandom, managing to catch the world of zines, video, and small communities just before the 'Net fully hit fandom. Occasionally a bit too filled with academic lingo for the average reader, but an utterly engrossing read for anyone involved in fandom.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa58a41b0)