Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $5.74 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 20 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Entrée to Entrelac: The Definitive Guide from a Biased Knitter Paperback – August 17, 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.21
$8.95 $2.89
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $100 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Discover it card and get a $100.00 Amazon.com Gift Card* after your first purchase within 3 months. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Entrée to Entrelac: The Definitive Guide from a Biased Knitter + Entrelac: The Essential Guide to Interlace Knitting + Knitting Brioche: The Essential Guide to the Brioche Stitch
Price for all three: $50.54

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Xrx Books (August 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933064196
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933064192
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 0.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #398,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Gwen Bortner has been designing knit patterns since 1994 and is the founder of Knitability, LLC. Elaine Rowley is the editor of XRX Books and the author of Babies & Toddlers: A Knitter’s Dozen, Bags, The Knitter’s Handbook, and Socks Socks Socks. Alexis Xenakis is the publisher of Knitter's Magazine and XRX Books. His photography is featured in all of XRX books. They both live in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Don't buy this book to learn entrelac.
Carolyn
Too much flipping back and forth to get all the info needed for a pattern.
Mary of Vermont
Very thorough, Good clear patterns and illustrations.
Patrick W. Ohlsen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Diane Bloomer on September 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
I bought this book for a number of reason - - one was that I, like the author, am intrigued by entrelac; two, the patterns included in the book were different than other patterns I have seen using entrelac and were wearable; and three, it looks to be a good reference book on the topic.

I am intrigued by entrelac because, even though it is worked in blocks, it is not a mitered square and it is drapey! It has a bias that you can use to make more flowing garments or stoles. I also love how it looks like woven swaths of knitted fabric, yet because of the construction, you can intersperse blocks of color whenever you like without impacting the integrity of the fabric. Ms. Bortner understands entrelac and how it can be pushed and pulled into various directions and fabrics.

While I am intrigued by entrelac, I have not found any clothing article I would want to make (much less wear) using this technique other than a scarf, shawl or stole. This book presents a number of clothing articles that I would actually wear! Ms. Bortner has designed articles of clothing that take advantage of the drape and swing of entrelac instead of fighting it into a box.

Ms. Bortner's approach to entrelac suits me just fine. The beginning of the book explains the structure of entrelac - - it is NOT a row by row affair, but rather, a tier by tier one. Understanding the interplay of the blocks is critical to understanding how entrelac works and how you can get it to work for you. I like how the book references the various tiers, instead of a "row-by-row" description for the pattern.

As the book progresses, so does the difficulty of the patterns.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Christine E. Peterson on September 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wandered over to the comments section for Entree to Entrelac, expecting reviewers to be falling over themselves with superlatives. Imagine my surprise!

Ms. Bortner published the "Prussian Jewels" pattern in Knitter's Magazine in 2008. I bought the supplies right away, and I did have to make it through the learning curve. Ravelry helped. The project looked gigantic when I started it, and I set it aside until July of this year. In the intervening two years or so, I tried my hand at entrelac again, this time for what was supposed to be a felted purse. My attempts to tweak the design resulted in a very large piece of fabric, so I bought yet MORE yarn, and turned it into a dynamite afghan. In the process, I became thoroughly enamored of the technique -- I'm a fan of all things modular.

As for Prussian Jewels, I need to finish the sleeves. I've tried it on, and it's fabulous. My heart absolutely soared when I saw that Ms. Bortner was doing a book, and I was simply ecstatic when the book arrived earlier than originally scheduled. As soon as I finish cranking out a baby outfit (this weekend?) I'll finish up Jewels. The cover sweater is calling my name for my next WIP -- this time I'll work from stash. That, and the Norah Gaughan-inspired coat.

Yes, as other reviewers point out, the directions take some effort on the part of the knitter. Entrelac fabrics are built, not created row-by-row from bottom to top. Each set of modules is different and needs to be presented separately. I suggest making a 3-hole punched color copy of the project instructions (for your personal use, of course) and popping it in a clear report cover with a pencil or pen attached. The graphic approach Ms. Bortner uses is very effective once the knitter 'gets it.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Elle B Sewing on July 27, 2011
Format: Paperback
I had mixed thoughts about buying this book since I had read some reviews that the patterns were hard to follow and that Rosemary Drysdale's book on entrelac was much better. They were right if you interpret better as easier. I have both books. I think this is much better book on entrelac since the author has the engineering of entrelac right so that your knitting lays flat instead of bulging out. So using her formulas, you can design your own clothes and incorporate entrelac into the design of any pattern you like besides knitting the cute designs she was come up with. So overall, the designs are better and the math is right. She makes you think but you'll understand entrelac when you are done. So I applaud the author for her work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Suzanne on July 22, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book does not simply teach entrelac. It teaches how to use entrelac to add shaping and design elements. It takes a bit of studying to get started, but using the techniques in this book I can now do almost anything with entrelac. It does not seem fair to compare this book with other basic how to books. It so thoroughly covers the technique that I now feel empowered to make whatever I want.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By M. Poller VINE VOICE on November 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Entrelac is fun and not difficult. I've designed several of my own because you just need to make a swatch of a few triangles and then 2 rows of rectangles to get your basic gauge. So Bortner really complicates the subject and I am just happy I don't need this book to understand the subject. There are some nice looking and complicated patterns here which use entrelac to make well fitting garments. But I will probably never have the patience to wade through the instructions. So many things that bother me: gauge depends on the yarn used and here as in all Knitters' magazines, you have to really search for the yarn called for. She does give the number of the yarn as in 3 or 4 for light or regular knitting yarns but in each group there are differences still. The actual yarns are listed in the back of the book with the yardage so if you can find the name of the yarn called for, you can then start to find a substitute as most of the yarns are pricey.
She emphasizes knitting backward which I don't bother with. The patterns are not entirely written out. Instead you have to use her special vocabulary and abbreviations to understand the pattern. She does explain designing using both the practical swatch system but also the mathematical basis which is interesting to know. I like her Arlis vest, but the photograph is far away from the actual pattern which is connected to the Arlis sweater. The pattern itself requires knowing her abbreviations and then referring to the various charts of the entrelac tiers. Unlike the Drysdale book, this one is poorly organized even though her patterns may be better designed. If you want everything on the subject by all means buy this book but if you need to choose then go for the Drysdale.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews