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Epicurus and Democritean Ethics: An Archaeology of Ataraxia (Cambridge Classical Studies) Paperback – December 14, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Cambridge Classical Studies
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (December 14, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521034450
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521034456
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 8.4 x 5.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,700,818 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is a piece of dense and detailed scholariship, painstakingly referenced and thoughtfully argued." Philosophy in Review

"This book will become a standard resource for historians of the period, providing an unsurpassed collection of material for studying the whole Democritean school, and in many cases providing definitive interpretations that will make further study unnecessary." Ethics

Book Description

The Epicurean philosophical system has enjoyed much recent scrutiny, but the question of its philosophical ancestry remains largely neglected. This book traces its origins in the fifth-century BC atomist Democritus, in his fourth-century followers such as Anaxarchus and Pyrrho, and in Epicurus' disagreements with his own Democritean teacher Nausiphanes. The result is not only a fascinating reconstruction of a lost tradition, but also an important contribution to the philosophical interpretation of Epicureanism, bearing especially on its ideal of tranquillity and on the relation of ethics to physics.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Debra Curwen on May 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
An excellent account of the subject matter. Superb presentation and very rigorous indeed.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Harry Macdonald on May 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In my opinion Warren's book - contrary to the above - is an intriguing and expansive treatment of Epicurus' moral theory. To dismiss Warren's conclusion so out of hand suggests to my mind misunderstanding more than anything else. Democritus seen as a model for Epicurus is in fact a hypothesis which is well substantiated, lucid and an exciting new angle on this topic.
I recommend this book unreservedly.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "lamberthn" on April 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As students of Dr. James "jimmy" Warren we would like to promulgate that - in spite of not having read this work - it is probably one of the finest intellectual achievements of the last century.
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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Paul Chappels on May 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I understand that the students did NOT read this book! The author explains a Democritus that did not exist. May be he was not the Democritus of Abdera, the atomist we knew. To say that the moral of Epicurus is COPIED from that of Democritus is completely CRAZY! The author ignores the CLINAMEN and the FREE WILL of Epicurus' morals. It is better to forget this book and to leave it to the students that do NOT read it.
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