Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.65
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by SuperBookDeals-
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: No guarantee on products that contain supplements and some products may include highlighting and writing.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Epidemics Laid Low: A History of What Happened in Rich Countries Paperback – March 16, 2006


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.97 $4.65

Editorial Reviews

Review

Bourdelais covers heavily traversed grounds in public health history, though providing his own insights along the way.

(Linda Bryder Health and History)

From the Back Cover

Justinian's Plague, the Black Death, the Great Plague, cholera, influenza, tuberculosis, AIDS―these diseases and others have devastated human lives and society, decimating populations, creating panic, and wrecking social and economic infrastructure. In Epidemics Laid Low epidemiologist and historian Patrice Bourdelais analyzes the history of such disease epidemics in Europe from the Middle Ages to the present. His captivating account describes how populations respond to crises of disease and how authorities deal with the devastation they bring.

Bourdelais discusses the successes of northern European countries in fighting and controlling infectious diseases and emphasizes, by comparison, the failures of the countries in the south. He links success to several factors: an ideology of progress, economic development, popular demands to improve public health, and investment in medical research. Bourdelais studies the social consequences of these policies, the changing as the tension mounts between advocates of individual freedom and advocates of collective interest.

Epidemics continue to threaten us today. What do our responses to these threats say about our priorities? Will the security of public health remain a privilege of a few powerful countries or will poorer countries benefit from the efforts of the rich to prevent the spread of disease inside their own borders?

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: science history