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Epilog Import


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Audio CD, Import, February 15, 2005
$75.05 $21.98

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 15, 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Phantom Sound & Vision
  • ASIN: B000BRATLW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,288,451 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey J.Park VINE VOICE on August 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I remember the buzz that swept through the prog community when this album was released by the now (sadly) defunct Swedish proggers Anglagard back in 1994. Certainly, I was not immune to the effects of this exciting development, and at the time it was my favorite rock album and Anglagard was my favorite new band. It appeared (back then at any rate) that a renaissance was being ushered in, whereby really good prog rock would once again take center stage after nearly a 20-year hiatus. Although that never did happen, this album will, in my opinion, forever remain as the single best symphonic progressive rock album released in current times (1994-present day). I also regard the album as the last gasp from a progressive rock style that all but faded away around 1976 or so.

The neat thing about Epilog is that it borrows from the past (early Genesis, 73-74 King Crimson), but also has its own unique voice. In fact, that is precisely what the best 1970s progressive rock was all about - a signature sound.

The music on the purely instrumental Epilog album is brooding, characteristically gloomy in a Swedish way, and alternates between very heavy, thunderous passages and quieter, spacey sections. The five pieces on the album include the 2'00" opening track Prolog; the 15'31" Hostejd; Skogsranden (10'47"); Sista Somrar (13'10"); and the closing track Sakandens Fullhet (1'59"). Themes are restated at specific points throughout the album, linking the five tracks. Although there are six tracks listed on the album, Rosten simply consists of 11 seconds of silence.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Uri Breitman on January 30, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This effort is different from the Hybris project, Anglagard's previous album. The style is less cheerful, and requires careful listening. It's a game of contrasts, really - the music is highly dynamic (fast-slow-fast, loud-slow-loud), and the musicians worked on complicated compositions.
This album is less "prog-rocky" than before, but it's more mature, deeper and more demanding. The recording quality is better than Hybris, the playing is tighter, and the special studio effects are masterful. The new digipak version has nice pictures and booklet, but the audio quality sounds the same to me. I'd recommend this to people who are not afraid of sad, modernistic & angry music.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lord Chimp on November 8, 2003
Format: Audio CD
_Epilog_ is considered one of the great masterpieces of Swedish symph prog and I would personally say it's the best Swedish prog album ever made (not that I've heard them ALL, but ya know...). It used to be something of a holy grail since it was out-of-print for years. It developed a rather legendary mystique with all the praise it received, and this was compounded by the fact that no one could find a copy of the darn thing. Thankfully, it has finally been re-released (along with Anglagard's first album, _Hybris_) in a gorgeous digipak. This all-instrumental album is pure prog: instrumentation consists of fat Rickenbacker bass, lush mellotrons, percussive Hammond organs, guitars, flute, and percussion. The music is complex and epic, full of tense interaction and head-spinning time-signature changes. The band is uniformly virtuoso but there is little emphasis on individual players -- distinct solo spots are uncommon, while tricky unisons and deft interplay stand out. Sounds like an good albeit normal prog album, so what's the big deal? It's hard to say what makes _Epilog_ so magical. The recipe of fervent symph prog-cum-Scandinavian lyricism just works amazingly well when employed by this group. The music has a great sense of textural depth and rhythmic fervor rivaled by few. There is also virtually no "prog cheese" in this music, possibly due to the band's dark Scandinavian undercurrents. And the drumming of the young Mattias Ollson is simply jaw-dropping. He knows few peers in the world of prog (he also plays on the White Willow albums _Ex Tenebris_ and _Sacrament_, and also with the stunning pop band Pineforest Crunch). Most important, _Epilog_ flows beautifully (from pastoral flute & acoustic guitars to all-out juicy prog onslaughts of unmatched energy), the course of the songs always urgently forming a compelling arc of thematic connections with the inevitability of gravity. No prog collection is complete without this masterpiece. I cannot recommend it enough.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By BENJAMIN MILER on November 12, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Änglagård sure worked hard to get themselves recognized in the prog rock community. They got to perform at Progfest '93 (the first one) in Los Angeles, and gave the previously unknown band tons of recognition. Two years after the release of the landmark Hybris, they released their followup, Epilog. Will they give us the sophomore slump? Not at all, in fact I think this album is even better than Hybris. There is a bit of a more classical feel to it, no doubt helped by the presence of cello. Unlike Hybris, there are a couple of short pieces that serve as preludes to the lengthy prog epics that are to come. The short pieces tend to be simply pieces played on piano or cello. The lengthy cuts are much like Hybris, only with an even more developed sound. The loud passages suddenly become quiet and vice versa, only it seems like the quiet passages seem to last longer. The Mellotron and Hammond organ are used just as proudly as their previous album. The band played as an ensemble, once again, to avoid solos or giving anyone an ego boost. Unfortunately the band broke up not too long after this album and their performance at Progfest '94 (which was documented on the album Buried Alive). I guess the reason for their breakup was they knew they probably could never live up to the high expectations that they gave us with their two albums if they were to release a third album. But no matter what, Epilog is another truly essential prog album.
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