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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Guitar
I have been playing for 40 years (yikes!). I started playing in the 60's when I was about 13 years old and have played both full time and part time professionally since I was in my early 20's. I have a Les Paul, Gretsch solid body Syncro, 1982 Ibanez AM50, two Fender Strats, a Tele and several acoustics. All these guitars have a sound and style of their own but only one...
Published on January 6, 2011 by Rick Holly

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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to spend more than $600.
I've been looking for a Sheraton II for several months. I've tried out at least 15-20 in several music stores and Guitar Centers. I've found three common problems: The China made Sheraton II's do not stay in tune, the volume/tone knobs and pots are of poor quality and the frets feel rough when you bend a note. I recently found a 2004 model made in Korea and the...
Published on February 7, 2011 by Roger


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Guitar, January 6, 2011
By 
I have been playing for 40 years (yikes!). I started playing in the 60's when I was about 13 years old and have played both full time and part time professionally since I was in my early 20's. I have a Les Paul, Gretsch solid body Syncro, 1982 Ibanez AM50, two Fender Strats, a Tele and several acoustics. All these guitars have a sound and style of their own but only one guitar does a little bit of everything. I have had my Sheraton since the late 90's when I bought it used (from the seriel # I find it was made in late 1988). If I am doing a job where I need to have one guitar to cover a large variety of styles (everything from classic rock to light jazz) this is the guitar I will take with me. The neck pick up has a nice smooth mellow and deep sound while the bridge pick up can scream with clear highs. When the two are mixed together (middle position on the 3 way) you can dial in a perfect blend for any music. Put it through a good distortion pedal (A vintage Ibanez TS9 or TS10 is my choice) and you can get a screaming rock or blues sound easily with a ton of sustain and no feedback.
The neck on this guiatar is very Les Paul like in width and depth and you can acheive a very low action (if that's what you are looking for). It's not light but that solid center block helps give you that sustain and tone. It weighs about the same as my Les Paul. My only complaint would be the gold plated pick ups, bridge and stop tail piece. From years of road use and sweat they are now pited and tarnished and no amount of cleaner seems to help. I just ordered a new bridge and stop tail piece and the pickup covers I can live with. I have owned both a Gibson ES-335 and a vintage 1963 ES-330 (trading it for another guitar is a major regret that I still carry). Tone wise this Epiphone Sheraton stands easily with either of those guitars and plays beautifully.
If I had to sell all my guitars except one, this is the one I would keep.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great surprise!, April 3, 2009
By 
This review is from: Epiphone Sheraton II Archtop Electric Guitar, Natural (Electronics)
I have had the Sheraton II for a couple of years. It was in need of some basic setup and "re-humidification" after it's stay at Guitar Center. Sometimes your hear complaints about the pickups, but when they are correctly adjusted they are really quite good. The multipiece neck is quite stable and pleasantly chunky in size.
Detail quality is excellent, which is why so many get this guitar when they are searching for a Gibson 335. Why spend the extra $2000? I could not find a 335 without blems and quality finish issues anyway.
This guitar is not my primary guitar, but is the semi-hollow I have wanted. It is good. I have the natural finish, but the sunburst is very attractive.
The tuning machines are adequate, not superb.
Fretboard is excellent, inlays superb, wood is excellent.
I rate this much higher than the Epi Dots I tested.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tuning problems? Do this!, November 14, 2013
By 
S. White (Sydney, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I am writing this review to primarily address the many reviews I see of this guitar where owners complain about tuning problems with their Sheraton II. I bought mine in 2009 and it was made in Korea at the Unsung factory, possibly the tail end of production before they shifted manufacturing to China. My particular guitar is stunning and I made sure I hand selected for the best looking wood and overall quality against a range of other Sheratons. Before I bought the Sherry I actually did extensive comparisons with Gibson 335's and guess what folks, I found quite a lot of imperfections on the Gibsons and there was little difference between the Sherry and Gibson apart from better hardware, electronics and PU's.

I was prepared to save a lot of money and upgrade my Sherry with stock 57's and improved hardware, pots and harness. For anyone having tuning issues from new, it is not just the Chinese models, my 2009 was hideous and would not stay in tune but the fix is very simple, here is what you do. Understand, the Sheraton nut is made of plastic, not great and you should upgrade it to bone or whatever you fancy when possible. However, in the meantime you need to clean out the nut recesses for the strings because when they are cut at factory they don't clean them out and clear them on the top three strings - this means there are very small bits of rough edges that you can't see. Find a small thin file, make sure not to make the nut grooves any deeper, but just run the file in the grooves and clear out any junk or plastic that is still stuck in there ... yes, I had it on mine.

Now when that is done, shave down some graphite from a pencil, the softer the better ... run the graphite into the grooves of the first three strings in the nut. Once done, tune up again and I promise in 90% of cases this will fix your tuning problems. It may take a little playing in at first but I had my Sheraton holding tune in 5 mins and it stayed there afterwards also, your problem is the NUT! I gave this guitar 4 stars but with the upgrades it is every bit as good as any Gibson I played and in my view is amazing value since the quality of the furniture, neck, body, inlay and binding make this an absolutely stunning guitar.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very versatile guitar with classy looks, March 1, 2011
I'm no expert but have been playing for almost 30 years. I wanted a guitar that could provide a lot of different sounds and which didn't need to be plugged in all the time, so I got a semi-hollow 335 style. I looked at Dots, but for less than the price of a new Dot (400) there was a Korean 1999 Sheraton II (on Cra-ig-sl-ist). These are a lot nicer than the Dots.

PROS: Very versatile, from mellow jazz through hard rock; the bridge pickup is surprisingly hot; looks great, with gold plated hardware, set neck, finished F-holes, V-inlay fret markers, full binding and the fancy headstock; you don't need an amp to play it -- unplugged it's like a nice muted acoustic; excellent sustain; very lively treble tones (it's all maple except for the fretboard); fantastic smooth and thin D-shaped neck; almost perfect frets (more on that below); stays in tune; fret markers are inlaid perfectly with no gaps; and, as everyone likes to say, good action.

CONS: Heavy; neck heavy, so if you're standing with a strap and let go of it the neck drops down; the top of the neck is kind of narrow for my taste; the gold plating wears off the hardware after a while; there are a few sharp ends on some frets that could use filing down; the volume pots are really only effective in the 5-10 range (lower settings all sound the same); bass tones can get overwhelmed by the lively treble; semi-hollows are tough to work on and repair (some luthiers even charge extra to work on semi-hollows); glossy finish on neck can sometimes cause your hand to drag (satin finish would be smoother); doesn't come with a case; who needs a marker on the first fret?

So everyone gives their guitar 5 stars, right? I'm sure a real Gibson 335 would blow this away, as it should for $3000, but the Sheraton II is a very good and reasonably priced 335 clone. Get a case, which goes for around $80-90 new.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epiphone Sheraton Review, October 31, 2009
By 
Josephh49 (San Antonio, TX) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Epiphone Sheraton II Archtop Electric Guitar, Natural (Electronics)
Bought my Sheraton II about 10 months ago. I went looking for a new guitar, was definitely not interested in a hollow body. The salesman at my local Sam Ash music store steered me away from a more expensive model, and talked me into trying this. Sat and played it for awhile. It wasn't what I was looking for, but it was what I realized I wanted. Finish is great, setup was great. Plays very smooth, although the strings were a little light gauge for my taste, even better play when I changed them. The best compliment that I can give this instrument is that if I had it to do all over again, I would buy it again. Highly recommended.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Be prepared to spend more than $600., February 7, 2011
I've been looking for a Sheraton II for several months. I've tried out at least 15-20 in several music stores and Guitar Centers. I've found three common problems: The China made Sheraton II's do not stay in tune, the volume/tone knobs and pots are of poor quality and the frets feel rough when you bend a note. I recently found a 2004 model made in Korea and the quality of this instrument is amazing. I would say that if you plan to buy a China made Sheraton that you be ready to put another $100-200 into it to make it playable. That or try to find a used Korean made one in good condition. You will get yourself a quality guitar with great tone and sustain for half the $600 price of a new one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing value, terrific instrument, January 20, 2009
By 
Josephh49 (San Antonio, TX) - See all my reviews
I was looking for a new guitar, having started playing after a long time off. When I played it I was amazed at the sound and action. This wasn't what I was looking for, but it was definitely what I wanted. I've owned it for about 5 months, playing it through Fender and Vox amps. The action is smooth, holds tuning perfectly, and gives an amazing range of tonal variations. I did compare it to the Epiphone Casino, and I preferred the sound of the humbuckers over the P90 style pickups. Highly recommended.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty nice, but had to solve out-of-tune issue, November 29, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I like the guitar. I've been playing since 1983 or so, electrics and acoustics and this was my plan for something in the middle, jazzy and bluesy. For that it's pretty good. Very strong output pickups, nice inlays, etc. However, I found that it was going out of tune constantly, like other reviewers said. I figured that can't be possible! Guitars don't just know how to go out-of-tune. I don't strum too hard or anything. But I'd play a chord, realize a note was off, and tweak it. Play a bit, retweak, etc.

Then I figured it out - the nut is too high! I suddenly realized that the string height at the first fret was substantially higher than at the second fret while fretting at the first. So I go out my tuner and tested the tuning after being in tune open and fretting at the first fret. That was it - they were all sharp. But as you moved toward the 12th fret, the error disappeared. Since the nut is too high, you stretch the string when fretting at the first (or 2nd or 3rd) frets.

If you're not into guitar maintenance, take this to a pro. I do my own. I got a micro hobby file and lowered each notch at the nut, comparing the difference with fretting at first fret. Also checked the tuning. This had a *huge* affect on the playability.

Worst thing - I've bought many guitars and this is the first one where they had this problem. For this price, I expect the guitar manufacturer to test and adjust this. Sure you can leave margin for different tastes in fret height, but that was just crazy.

If you can get past that, it's a nice playable guitar!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great guitar, December 29, 2009
I've had my Sheraton II since the late 90's. If you're a brand snob, the Epiphone may be an issue, but that has nothing to do with the actual guitar. Obviously, 5 stars for a $600 guitar and 5 stars for a $2000+ guitar have different meaning. In this price range, there are very few guitars as nice as the Sheraton II. There is debate about the quality of the current china made versus the earlier oversea epi's, but from what I've read, the newest ones are fine as well. From personal experience, many guitars just need minor adjustments in the setup to make all the difference, and that depends on personal preference. Nobody buys an expensive guitar and leaves it the way it was shipped, so why should an economical one not get the same adjustments? The only issue I've had with mine (earlier model) is that the gold plating has faded slightly, but it really just adds to the vintage look of the guitar. The pickups in mine have been great and I've not felt the urge to replace them with something "better." The finish on mine is beautiful and has been very durable, but the color of the vintage sunburst on the newer ones is not as dark as mine, so be aware of the change. The older ones like mine seem to be less yellow from what I've seen. It has a distinguished look and after 10 years, it plays even better than new.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great guitar at a great value, January 30, 2009
By 
This is the second Epiphone guitar I've owned. The first was a hollowbody Casino (Casinos are often mistaken for semi-hollowbody) and the Sheraton is my second.

How do they compare? While the Casino is more jangly, its full hollowbody and P90 pickups means that it is prone to feedback, even at moderate volumes, so you really need to pay attention to where you're standing in relation to speakers. The Sheraton doesn't have these problems. The Casino was lighter...

Both of these guitars are great. However, I prefer my Sheraton. I bought a used one for $400. The original owner had changed the tuners and the pots. The guitar now looks more like a Sheraton Elitist, which are something like $1,300, if I'm not mistaken. The original humbuckers are pretty good. They deliver a wide tonal range that, while not as bright as the Casino's twin P90s, do not have the tendency to feedback or get piercing.

The gutiar looks great too! I have a sunburst, lighter than a typical sunburst. Its more like a honeyburst. The body is bound, the neck has two running lines going down the back. The fret markers are the best, though; pearloid 1935 "V" cut. Check those out! The headstock logo's real sharp too. For looks, the only thing lacking on the Sheraton is the tailpiece. That's almost purley cosmetic though, but I wish the Sheraton had the Casino or, preferably, the Riviera/ Emperor tailpeice.

My used Sheraton needed a good set-up. That set me back about $70, but was worth it. So, I got this guitar, set-up, plus a beaten-up case for $509 (that's after shipping expenses too). You'd be hard pressed to find a better guitar at $500. Go to a store and play a Sheraton if you don't believe me!
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