Rocky & Bullwinkle & Friends 4 Seasons 1961

Amazon Instant Video

Season 3
(74) IMDb 7.7/10

14. Episode 14 TV-G CC

"Missouri Mish Mash" Part 1 Aesop and Son, "The Coyote and the Jackrabbits" Peabody, "Ludwig Van Beethoven" "Missouri Mish Mash" Part 2

Runtime:
23 minutes
Original air date:
November 12, 1961

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Season 3

Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Fantasy, Comedy, Kids & Family
Season year 1962
Network Classic Media
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

132 of 133 people found the following review helpful By Bill Larkin on September 4, 2005
Format: DVD
Sony Wonder, Bullwinkle Studios and Ward Productions continue the Rocky & Bullwinkle Series with this release of the "3rd Season". Calling it "Rocky & Bullwinkle and Friends" the 4-DVD set holds a total of 726 minutes of show content and 12 minutes of "Special Features".

As before, the restoration is the best applied to these classic cartoons yet. Although, sadly, it still isn't on par with the restorations done with the Looney Tunes series currently being released. However, us die-hard fans have waited a long time for this, so I won't complain too loud.

Here's what awaits you:

26 episodes of "Missouri Mish Mash" (with Gidney & Cloyd)

18 episodes of "Lazy Jay Ranch" (with Lazy Jay, of course)

8 episodes of "The Three Moosketeers" (with King Wuncelaus, Francois Villian, Athos, and Philippe Mignon)

14 episodes of "Topsy Turvy World" (with Captain Peachfuzz)

Those no-goodnicks, Boris and Natasha, appear in all but "The Three Moosketeers".

Also, spaced out between the episodes are Aesop and Son (11); Bullwinkle's Corner (20); Peabody (22); Fractured Fairy Tales (22); Mr. Know-It-All (13); and Dudley Do-Right (11).

The "Special Features" are less than exciting. The best of them is the "Live Bullwinkle Puppet Clips". This is a collection from the 1961 Bullwinkle Show in where Bill Scott voices a puppet that intros the cartoons. It includes the one occasion where Bullwinkle instructs the kids to "...pull the knobs off your TV sets. That way, we'll be sure to be with you next week." The remaining two "Special Features" include a "Sneak Peek at Season 4" (good news....more are coming!) that is an episode from "Painting Theft", which will appear on the next set.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Mark Baker - Carstairs Considers HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 20, 2006
Format: DVD
The puns are punnier and the stories are zanier as Rocky and Bullwinkle enter their fun filled third season. It consists of 33 episodes with everyone's favorite animated moose and squirrel as well as their friends and enemies.

The central focus of the show is the continuing exploits of Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Bullwinkle J. Moose. Each episode features two segments of the current serialized story, and there are four of them this time around.

Missouri Mish Mash finds Bullwinkle and Rocky caught in the middle of a feud being run by Boris Badenov, their arch nemesis. However, when Bullwinkle finds a special hat, things really start to get interesting.

Lazy Jay Ranch finds our heroes moving to Wyoming after they buy a ranch. Turns out it's a worm ranch, and Boris has plans of his own for those worms.

The Three Moosketeers brings our heroes to the country of Applesauce Lorraine after the rightful king is replaced by the scheming Francois Villain. (Something tells me he's a bad guy.) Of interest, this is the first Rocky and Bullwinkle story to not feature Boris and his sidekick Natasha Fatale.

Topsy Turvy World finds the world's axis shifting. With the new North Pole on the Equator, it's up to Rocky and Bullwinkle to right the world before Boris gives Santa a bad name.

Of course, each episode also includes several special features. Either a Fractured Fairy Tale or an Aesop and Son (a fable like you've never heard before), Bullwinkle's Corner (poetry and nursery rhymes for laughs) or Mr. Know-it-All (Bullwinkle shows us how NOT to do something), and Peabody's Improbably History (a dog makes sure history goes as recorded) or Dudley Do-Right (a spoof of melodramas set in Canada.
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Gord Wilson VINE VOICE on December 16, 2005
Format: DVD
Although there were some complaints about the packaging of Season Two, Season Three is a Jay Wardian delight; the four discs are well protected, and there's even art inside the slipcase where you can barely see it. For the third season, the writing got both worse and better. Aesop's Fables are a snooze and Fractured Fairy Tales fall flat, but for R and B (Rocky and Bullwinkle, it's a high point. The set starts off with "Missouri Mish Mash" (shows 1-13, 26 episodes) featuring not only moon men Gidney and Cloyd, but the famed Kirward Derby. Then it's "Lazy Jay Ranch" (shows 14-22, 18 episodes), "The Three Mooseketeers (shows 23-26, 8 episodes), and the grand finale, "Topsy Turvy World" with Captain Peter "Wrongway" Peachfuzz (shows 27-33, 14 episodes).

Aside from the obvious delight of either reliving these episodes or discovering R and B anew, the show is a primer in the art of limited animation, and it's one Matt Groening has obviously been watching. The actual R and B episodes are quite short, as are the rotating supporting shorts "Bullwinkle's Corner," "Mr. Know It All," "Peabody and Sherman," and "Dudley Do Right" along with Aesop and the fairy tales. But the numerous stretches of repeating animation: "Hey Rocky, watch me pull a rabbit out of my hat!" "Again?" known as interstices or bumpers, which segue in and out of commercials and station breaks are welcome rather than annoying, and make the show as familiar and comfy as an old chair.

The show is a brilliant coup of limited animation, since these bits are repeated every show. Matt Groening has clearly inherited the mantle of Jay Ward. Look at the long, lavish and looked-forward to openings of The Simpsons and Futurama.
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